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Fire escape rappel


Original Post
Jon Horde · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2018 · Points: 0

Looking for gear advice. Spend a lot of time in hotels around the world. Want to add an extreamly light weight and compact emergency gear to my suitcase for LAST CHOICE fire escape rappel. 100’ of Kevlar paracord, (1250#) doubled and locking carabiner with a Sterling rope lightning hook. 

99% of you just thought, “what an idiot, it can’t be done safely” but theres somebody who can give me some advice. It’s got to be better than burning to death. Any thoughts?

Thank you.

FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 275

Stay in nicer hotels?

Insist on a room on the ground floor?

Micaiah W · · Drake, CO · Joined Jul 2017 · Points: 0

Google firefighter window bailout technique. 

You don't need to get all the way to the ground,  just to a window for reentry below the fire floor.

Requires something to wedge in the corner of the window to wrap the rope on.  

Practiced these in my fire academy.  Was one of the more fun things we practiced. 

alexd81 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 20

Any reasonably modern hotel is built to fire code that requires the structure to be able to contain fires. Unless your own room is on fire, the safest option it to close the entry door, sit tight, and wait for the firefighters. The chances that your only path to safety is a rappel are astronomically low. It’s not even worth the effort to think about it in my opinion. 

t.farrell · · New York, NY · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 60

I can’t speak to your rope set up but I highly recommend a 36V Bosch Rotary Hammer for drilling into the concrete floor. This will allow you to drill holes to start building your anchor. Normally I’d recommend a corded drill, but sometimes the power goes out/gets shut off in fires. I’m not up to date on the lightest weight bolts for which I apologize. 


Edit: I believe Kevlar has a low melting point. Probably not the best in a fire scenario. Someone please confirm? You may experiment with steel cable and a Munter hitch which will not melt. Don’t forget to knot the ends.

sfotex · · Sandy, UT · Joined Jul 2007 · Points: 225
Hobo Greg · · My Van · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 160

Tuck and roll, man.

Alex Bury · · Ojai, CA · Joined Jun 2012 · Points: 1,948

t.farrell wrote:

Edit: I believe Kevlar has a low melting point. Probably not the best in a fire scenario. Someone please confirm? You may experiment with steel cable and a Munter hitch which will not melt. Don’t forget to knot the ends.

All jokes aside....

Kevlar has a higher melting point than nylon, and is often used for high temp applications.


Kevlar is an aramid. You are likely confusing the material with Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene, aka Dyneema. Both aramids and UHMWP are advanced, high tenacity fibers. But its the UHMWP (Dyneema, Spectra) that has the low melting point.

t.farrell · · New York, NY · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 60

Thank you for clarifying. Couldn’t remember which tech cord was low melt. 

simplyput . · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2013 · Points: 60

Die Hard.

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 490
Nate Tastic · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 10

Shoot, I want one of these for my one story house.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=463ERVmtEg0

David Gibbs · · Ottawa, ON · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 6

Stay in hotels that already have these in the room.  I know I saw a rope, rappel, and anchor setup for window-escape at the last hotel I stayed at in South Korea, and I know I've seen a similar setup before, pretty sure it was on a previous visit to South Korea. So, there's your solution... only stay at hotels in South Korea. :)

that guy named seb · · Britland · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 205
Marc801 C · · Sandy, Utah · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 65

alexd81 wrote:

Any reasonably modern hotel is built to fire code that requires the structure to be able to contain fires. Unless your own room is on fire, the safest option it to close the entry door, sit tight, and wait for the firefighters. The chances that your only path to safety is a rappel are astronomically low. It’s not even worth the effort to think about it in my opinion. 

In the US at least; not necessarily "around the world".

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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