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New and Experienced Climbers over 50


Jeffrey Constine · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined May 2009 · Points: 588

Gotta keep moving: Fact!

Cosmiccragsman AKA Dwain · · Las Vegas, Nevada · Joined Apr 2010 · Points: 60

lol.
68.
No.
64.
Next year 65 and will get Medicare.
Maybe I'll be able to get my back fixed and be able to climb again.
2 years of not being able to climb is driving me nuts!

Lori Milas · · Rocklin, CA · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175

So, what I think we have here is a virtual campfire.      I haven't been around other MP sites very much, but it appears the talk is mostly nuts and bolts informational.  I appreciate the camaraderie and sharing here... the friendships that have developed.  Everyone but Jeffrey, who's tag is 'gotta keep moving: Fact!'.  So he gets to swing by for a hot dog, and then he'd be off for some night climbing.   

Lori Milas · · Rocklin, CA · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175

I was reading a description of crack climbing and wondered what a doctor would say about this:  

"Look for wide places in the crack where you can jam your foot straight in.  If the crack is thin, turn the inside of your ankle up, stick your toe in sideways, torque HARD, and stand up."   Seems like this should be titled "How to snap an ankle".    

But this is EXACTLY how it felt.  Add the hand jams, and it is a recipe for misery.  (which I intend to do the very next time I find a crack to climb).  I obviously didn't figure out the hand jam part, because I got up to my shoulder, and still couldn't grab it.  

Caped Baldy · · Used car lot · Joined Jul 2018 · Points: 80
Lori Milas wrote: I was reading a description of crack climbing and wondered what a doctor would say about this:  

"Look for wide places in the crack where you can jam your foot straight in.  If the crack is thin, turn the inside of your ankle up, stick your toe in sideways, torque HARD, and stand up."   Seems like this should be titled "How to snap an ankle".    

But this is EXACTLY how it felt.  Add the hand jams, and it is a recipe for misery.  (which I intend to do the very next time I find a crack to climb).  I obviously didn't figure out the hand jam part, because I got up to my shoulder, and still couldn't grab it.  

Instead of jamming sometimes you have to try fisting. 

Lori Milas · · Rocklin, CA · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175
Russ Walling wrote: I just read a bunch of this old folks jabber  , and in skimming a couple things came up that I can comment on...

Plateau?  That one is in your brain.  Gains are quick at first since you went from basically being a hazard in the kitchen to someone who can confidently climb a ladder... It takes YEARS of climbing and training to even find out if you have plateaued, and even then you are probably wrong. Maybe it's just training wrong or eating wrong or getting bad feedback from other climbers.  But, hitting an upper limit is a real thing, but you are so freshly minted as a climber it seems impossible you are anywhere near the ceiling of your potential.

RGold is always gold.... great advice as always

Swelling in fingers? That is a fake tough one.  On one hand (pun intended) your swollen fingers are a pretty big problem and you should introduce yourself to an ice and rest routine.  On the other hand, I've had one finger that will swell every time I go climbing, and then stay swollen for weeks afterword.  I tape it before climbing as tight as I can and use it to its limit.  Then I ice it.  I have been doing this same routine on this finger for 30 years.  If I waited for it to heal (and I've had many layoffs of many months before) I would have never climbed again.  So, since you are new, I would say limit crimps and then do ice and rest and try to get it better.  Mine will never get better but yours probably will.

I've never had a climbing gym to go to or have ever climbed in one... (except for the Overpass in Pasadena) but I've seen plenty of people blown up from the gym.  I was big on training though, using weights and all the hangboard routines of the day along with climbing.  I would think that using the gym for doing larger hold stuff would be great for endurance and getting the movement down... using a hangboard for finger strength seems way more controllable than any sort of crimper route in the gym.  And doing weights will give you a bit more power without the umph required to boulder out the same workload. Sensible training and not getting hurt while training takes more care than just getting super pumped in the gym and throwing for that crimper just below the anchor.  Working on each part separately and in total control seems like a good way not to get hurt.

I like what Idaho Bob is doing too...

Learn your limits, and learn when pain is fake, and when it means something.  I hurt all over almost all the time.  The docs could start at my big toe and work their way up with at least 5 pretty good surgeries. The key is I know how to climb around them, not really aggravate them, and for the most part they do not hinder any climbing I want to do.  I've been this way for decades as have many other climbers I know and they all seem to get by, and at a high level.

I probably had more but forgot what I was going to ramble on about...

Russ... and everyone else who has been contributing, I REALLY appreciate you!  You all have saved my day(s) in more ways than just climbing--and I know I'm not the only one.  I needed the humor, and the reminders of what this is really all about.

There may have been a sense of urgency, because I like to say "My biological clock is ticking!".  Many of you have 40 years or more under your belts, and so this is like a long, comfortable marriage. I'm feeling rushed to learn, in so little time.  I need to slow down.  Thanks for the words " It takes YEARS of climbing and training to even find out if you have plateaued."   

All the conversation about gym climbing has me really considering how much to do there going forward.  All the pain, swelling, etc  has been from the indoor work.  Wendy might weigh in on this.. maybe over time the crimps get easy and the indoor work translates well to outdoors?  The gym has been a way to workout and stay connected to climbing... but for me, it's not climbing.  

As for being a hazard in the kitchen... now you are hitting below the belt, Russ!  NO SOUP FOR YOU!    

wendy weiss · · boulder, co · Joined Mar 2006 · Points: 10
Lori Milas wrote:


All the conversation about gym climbing has me really considering how much to do there going forward.  All the pain, swelling, etc  has been from the indoor work.  Wendy might weigh in on this.. maybe over time the crimps get easy and the indoor work translates well to outdoors?  The gym has been a way to workout and stay connected to climbing... but for me, it's not climbing.

Doing only indoor climbing now, I miss climbing real rock. But looking back, the advent of climbing gyms really improved my outdoor climbing. One very obvious reason is that, until gyms came along, I was climbing only about half the year (hated ice climbing) and then only on weekends and short vacations. Then, suddenly, I was climbing several times a week year-round. Second, I was doing more and more leading indoors, which helped my confidence for leading harder stuff outside. Third, climbing the gym's steep jug hauls made overhanging rock less intimidating. And fourth (and finally?), I had more opportunity to watch very good climbers and observe their techniques. While my husband-partner was a much better climber than I, he's also about 8" taller, so he approached problems way differently than I had to.

That said, all the climbing you can cram in indoors can lead to more use injuries. I've had rotator cuff surgery on both shoulders. But, despite all the crimping, I've been very lucky with my fingers. And, for better or worse, my gym seems to be putting up more climbs with larger, less positive holds that rely more on body position. So I've had to learn a new set of skills.

BTW, when it comes to hand cracks, a problem for me was that a larger person's hand crack was off-hands for me. But you may find that you can get a lot more of your fingers into a finger crack than most men.

Anyway, since gym climbing is what I do now, I focus on the challenges it presents and the opportunity to maintain climbing friendships. And I'm still hopelessly chasing grades, even as my strength and endurance decline.    

Jeffrey Constine · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined May 2009 · Points: 588
Cosmic dude coming up to the summit.
Lori Milas · · Rocklin, CA · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175
Jeffrey Constine wrote:
Cosmic dude coming up to the summit.

Pasadena? 

Jeffrey Constine · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined May 2009 · Points: 588

Nope. but close.

Lori Milas · · Rocklin, CA · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175
Jeffrey Constine wrote: Nope. but close.

Well, heck. I'll be driving through Burbank, Glendale and Pasadena tomorrow.  I'll keep an eye out for any persons hanging off rocks, or Pasadena overpasses.  I never knew when we were making out with boys on top of these arches some people were climbing them.    

Jeffrey Constine · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined May 2009 · Points: 588

Can do a PDQ Climbing session in the am in Santa Monica with ya! No approach just get out yur car and climb.
 

John Barritt · · OKC · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 1,080

There you go, PDQ climbing and selfie w/Jeff...... ;)

Jeffrey Constine · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined May 2009 · Points: 588

LOL John U come out too!

Lori Milas · · Rocklin, CA · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175
Jeffrey Constine wrote: Can do a PDQ Climbing session in the am in Santa Monica with ya! No approach just get out yur car and climb.
 

Oh... so close, but yet so far!  Can't figure out any way to be in Santa Monica in the a.m.  Driving down from Sacramento... directly to first appointment in Seal Beach at 2.  

Jeff... thanks for the offer.  I hope we find  another time.  I feel like I missed a real opportunity.  

Jeffrey Constine · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined May 2009 · Points: 588

on the way back. not working right now I have plenty of time.

John Barritt · · OKC · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 1,080

There you go, 2 point 0.....

Athletic tape between the finger joints (not too tight) will take some pressure off the tendons btw

Lori Milas · · Rocklin, CA · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175
Jeffrey Constine wrote: Can do a PDQ Climbing session in the am in Santa Monica with ya! No approach just get out yur car and climb.
 

PDQ.  I give up.  What is it?  Could it be 'pretty darn quick'?

Carl Schneider · · Adelaide, South Australia · Joined Dec 2017 · Points: 0
Lori Milas wrote: So, what I think we have here is a virtual campfire.      I haven't been around other MP sites very much, but it appears the talk is mostly nuts and bolts informational.  I appreciate the camaraderie and sharing here... the friendships that have developed.  Everyone but Jeffrey, who's tag is 'gotta keep moving: Fact!'.  So he gets to swing by for a hot dog, and then he'd be off for some night climbing.   

Yeah, cool camp fire chat.  Pass the bottle...

Old lady H · · Boise, ID · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 793
Lori Milas wrote:

PDQ.  I give up.  What is it?  Could it be 'pretty darn quick'?

Yup. Unless you merit "Police Department for Questioning", in which case you are definitely having too much fun.

Best, OLH
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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