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lead rope solo review of wild country revo


Jeff constine · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2009 · Points: 442

You know all about dudes with skirts it sounds like lol!

Healyje · · PDX · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 456

Well, we do have all kinds of climbers around here who do odd things but - kilts or grigris for soloing - I don't judge the man, just the application, but then I won't climb under either of them...

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 490
Jeff constine wrote: Why are you so angry Healjinks/up/old/man, armchair climbing these days? Gri Gri's work great if you are in the know. There is a device I removed for this climb so I don't give away my secret to make the gri work great for solo leading.

Did your mom make you edit your post?

Jon LostVegan · · SL,UT · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 5
Josh Landis wrote: I’ve noticed that my SP locks up much faster when the clutch side is facing slightly downward. Slow falls with the clutch side angled up take longer to brake. 

I wear mine (backwards) because of this... so the housing part (the protruding cylinder) faces inwards. I use two ‘biners connected directly to my tie-in points parallel to my belay loop (I keep my belay loop(s) on the right side because of personal preference).


But it def. locks quicker in this configuration . As you fall the SP “tilts” up as it tightens and runs along the spine of the beiners, or the ‘biner rotate with the SP, eventually ending up pretty much parallel to the ground more or less. But the difference is negladgable... maybe 2-3” quicker if the cylinder/housing is facing in/down in a fall. If I’m on sketchy gear, maybe I should be flipping it for a bit more dynamic catch. I don’t know why I set it up this way... just the way I always have done it. And it works well for me. But it’s been said before... the system that works best is the one that keeps you safe, and that you’ve taken the time to perfect. Any solo leading “system” is quite foreign at first.
I prefer the SP because it’s one of the few devices specifically made for rope-solo leading. It was created so long ago that it’s big and somewhat bulky. I’m sure if they kept-up with the design it would be less than half the size these days. Look at the old grigri, or the beiners we used to use in the 80’s/90’s compared to new models.
But all the best to anyone out there rope soloing. Be safe, think through your systems and double check everything and have a backup in place... you’re out there to enjoy yourself! So remember to do that.
Healyje · · PDX · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 456
Jon LostVegan wrote:

 I’m sure if they kept-up with the design it would be less than half the size these days. Look at the old grigri, or the beiners we used to use in the 80’s/90’s compared to new models.

Looking at the design I don't believe that would be the case as the drum diameter would appear to be a pretty crucial design parameter relative to it actually locking up.
Sam Cieply · · Venice, CA · Joined Jun 2016 · Points: 20
Jeff constine wrote: Oh to have some fun! lol Cuz peeps are so crazy on here.

Well that’s the pot calling the kettle black!

David Kerkeslager · · New Paltz, NY · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 77
Healyje wrote: Looking at the design I don't believe that would be the case as the drum diameter would appear to be a pretty crucial design parameter relative to it actually locking up.

Additionally, it seems like the rope is a way more integral part of the engaging action than with i.e. a GriGri or an ATC. The wide variety of modern ropes makes me think it's unlikely that a new version of the SP will be released. The testing involved would be pretty costly.

Ryan McDermott · · Pittsburgh, PA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 95
Jeff constine wrote:
A gri gri will have to do till I get my hands on a REVO.

Selling my Revo for $150 shipped. 

David Kerkeslager · · New Paltz, NY · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 77
Ryan McDermott wrote:

Selling my Revo for $150 shipped. 

I also would be willing to purchase a Revo for $144.95 from REI and have it shipped to you for a $5 fee.

Healyje · · PDX · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 456

You could if it weren't back ordered 2-3 months everywhere and that's probably optimistic guessing.

David Kerkeslager · · New Paltz, NY · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 77

Still, it seems a bit opportunistic to sell it for more than MSRP.

eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 442
David Kerkeslager wrote: Still, it seems a bit opportunistic to sell it for more than MSRP.

When you factor in the shipping cost, the guy is probably breaking even or even losing a little bit of money if shipping is more than $5, which is probably will be. He's probably effectively selling it for less than MSRP, and if you count tax then quite a bit less than what he paid for it.

rkrum · · CO-ish · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 40

Not that anyone should care, but I also prefer a gri gri for lead rope soloing. Having a backpack of rope is a deal breaker for me - major suck in chimneys, mega flares, many roofs etc.

Adding a microtrax to aid in rope management I've found to be key. Cutting the usual tab and being particular about rope selection helps immensely too.

Healyje · · PDX · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 456
rkrum wrote: Not that anyone should care, but I also prefer a gri gri for lead rope soloing...Cutting the usual tab and being particular about rope selection helps immensely too.
Did that for about a decade before the Eddy came out - would never consider going back to it.
rkrum · · CO-ish · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 40

Ever try it with the "modern" crop of thin ropes? Just curious. Using a 9.2 mammut right now with mine and it's a night and day difference vs the handful of ropes in the 9.5-9.7 range I tried before.

One thing that does annoy me is back up knots, which I still consider mandatory (for my level of risk acceptance) with this set up. That aspect of eddy is a definite plus.

Healyje · · PDX · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 456

I haven't, might consider going down to a 9.6, but would be quite uncomfortable on the catching falls versus streaming rope front below that - I currently use a Maxim Glider 9.9 with the Eddy and it's pretty flawless and trouble-free and that's because the rope path through the Eddy is the reverse of the grigri.

The backup knot deal isn't tied to the device, but to the human - you can use or not use them with any of the devices, I just choose not to use them.

rkrum · · CO-ish · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 40

Gotcha.

I agree to a certain extent re: back up knots tied to the user, not necessarily the device. I choose to use back up knots with a skinny rope and gri gri since I've found it seems to be easier to induce one particularly problematic failure mode with a skinny rope - partially unlocking a locked gri gri, then weighting the device again and, well, quickly going either to the end of your rope or back up knot. There is also the usual possibility of pinning the cam down in a fall, etc. That doesn't appear to be a concern with the eddy. IE, from what I can tell, an eddy w/out back up knots has less ways of trying to kill you vs a gri gri w/out knots.

Edit: I've only played around with a friend's eddy, never actually owned one. So the above may be little more than just speculation on my part. Obviously you've got much more experience with probably both of these devices than I do. Also, for clarification, the main appeal of the gri gri is not wearing a backpack of rope (I use a microtrax on a sling off a gear loop on my harness to keep the rope weight off the gri gri, it's a miserable set up without this). The way the rope runs through the eddy seems brilliant if you're backpacking rope, but not so much if you're streaming rope in front of you. Is my impression here correct?

Kyle Elliott · · Everett, WA · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 505
Ryan McDermott wrote:

Selling my Revo for $150 shipped. 

I'll sell my purple vergo (lightly used) for 275, and a brand new gold one for 500. They're pre-recall. 

Ryan McDermott · · Pittsburgh, PA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 95
eli poss wrote:

When you factor in the shipping cost, the guy is probably breaking even or even losing a little bit of money if shipping is more than $5, which is probably will be. He's probably effectively selling it for less than MSRP, and if you count tax then quite a bit less than what he paid for it.

That's right. You can get a fully functioning Revo now, or you can wait indefinitely for WC to re-release the same thing (likely without the pointless latch that comes undone on the original model). 

Healyje · · PDX · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 456
rkrum wrote:I choose to use back up knots with a skinny rope and gri gri since I've found it seems to be easier to induce one particularly problematic failure mode with a skinny rope - partially unlocking a locked gri gri, then weighting the device again and, well, quickly going either to the end of your rope or back up knot. There is also the usual possibility of pinning the cam down in a fall, etc. That doesn't appear to be a concern with the eddy. IE, from what I can tell, an eddy w/out back up knots has less ways of trying to kill you vs a gri gri w/out knots.
Yes, a rope that skinny is a problem and the reason you're using one that skinny is to overcome the problems associated with the rope path of the grigri being backward from what you want. Unfortunately, that introduces the new problems you mention. You gain in movement but have to mitigate the increased risk.

rkrum wrote:
Also, for clarification, the main appeal of the gri gri is not wearing a backpack of rope (I use a microtrax on a sling off a gear loop on my harness to keep the rope weight off the gri gri, it's a miserable set up without this). The way the rope runs through the eddy seems brilliant if you're backpacking rope, but not so much if you're streaming rope in front of you. Is my impression here correct?
No, it's the opposite - the Eddy actually works best with fewer errant lockups if the rope is just streaming down from it, but man I hate climbing that way and much prefer having it in a pack. But having it in a pack means you always have to ensure you keep a loop of free rope out so it hangs below the device otherwise anytime the rope goes straight from the pack to the Eddy it's going to remain locked until you re-establish a loop of slack below the device and clear the lock.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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