Mountain Project Logo

Kong Slyde?


eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 507
Drew Nevius wrote: I played with a few configurations and this proved to be the easiest way to lengthen the tether when clipped to something. Like Eli and others said, it requires partially unweighting it. While my weight is off it, I flip the device and hold it in place while I lean onto it and rope pulls through. Once it’s at the length I want, I let go of the Slyde and it locks up again. Not sure if this is within recommended usage and there may be potential dangers if the Slyde moves up onto the gate or spine of the biner rather that staying in the bottom of it (causing it to los incorrectly), but it’s been working for me.

https://youtu.be/lmygw-FJHa8 

This is what I used to do initially when I started using the slyde but I stopped for two reasons:

  1. it was more effort to rotate the slyde while slightly weighting it to feed out slack than to just fully unweight it and pull slack through the plate

  2. after a while, it slowly started fraying the sheath if I put slightly too much weight on it while adjusting

If it continues to work well for you, I wouldn't worry to much about the slyde moving out of the basket. 

Bentjammer Brown · · Giles, VA · Joined Oct 2014 · Points: 5

I set my Kong Slide up similar to the one in this photo. Only exception was I have a Grivel Clipsydra on the ATC end, it has a keeper clip that prevents me from dropping my ATC when opening the gates. I like having my PAS already set up for pulling closer to the anchor. Having a pre-rigged ATC that is properly adjusted for optional extended rappel is very handy and saves time. I also keep a Hollowblock clipped on my leg loop for third hand safety - can use as a Kliemheist, auto block, or Prussik as required.

Drew Nevius · · Oklahoma · Joined Jun 2012 · Points: 1,698
eli poss wrote:

This is what I used to do initially when I started using the slyde but I stopped for two reasons:

  1. it was more effort to rotate the slyde while slightly weighting it to feed out slack than to just fully unweight it and pull slack through the plate

  2. after a while, it slowly started fraying the sheath if I put slightly too much weight on it while adjusting

If it continues to work well for you, I wouldn't worry to much about the slyde moving out of the basket. 

I think with my rope being 9mm, it’s much easier to use my full weight to pull rope through than to pull it by hand. If I had a skinner rope I could see how manually pulling it might be reasonable in order to reduce fraying. I think any minor fraying is worth it though since I have more rope to easily replace when the time comes

eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 507
Drew Nevius wrote:

I think with my rope being 9mm, it’s much easier to use my full weight to pull rope through than to pull it by hand. If I had a skinner rope I could see how manually pulling it might be reasonable in order to reduce fraying. I think any minor fraying is worth it though since I have more rope to easily replace when the time comes

Makes sense. Are you just using a chopped off section of old rope or did you by rope specifically for the slyde? If buying specifically for the slyde, it may make sense to choose a rope with a higher sheath % in anticipation of this. 

Drew Nevius · · Oklahoma · Joined Jun 2012 · Points: 1,698

When i got my Slyde, I already had a 5yo 9.1mm rope that had some fuzz spots, so I’m just using it

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Climbing Gear Discussion
Post a Reply to "Kong Slyde?"

Log In to Reply