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boots - mt aconcagua


Original Post
Hannah-Grace Kelley · · denver, co · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 0

hello! i had written on here a few months ago regarding finding double boots for Aconcagua in my size. unfortunately, i never found any that fit so i am going to overboot route. i am planning on ordering overboots from 40 below's website. has anyone had good luck with overboots from them? how can i mitigate my feet from getting cold while on the mountain since i am doing this instead of double boots? 

thanks!

Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 322

What sort of boots will you be wearing under the over boots? 

jg fox · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2015 · Points: 5

I would consider super gaiters from Mountain Tools, you won't have to readjust your crampons and be as awkward on your feet.

Hannah-Grace Kelley · · denver, co · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 0

I'll be wearing a Scarpa Charmoz Pro GTX under the overboot... do you think that'd work? 

Jeremy Cote · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2015 · Points: 0

The easiest way to keep feet warm is to stay optimally hydrated and use a travel size anti-perspirant on your feet each night. Don't forget a light pair of wool socks that live in your sleeping bag.

Daniel Joder · · Barcelona, Spain · Joined Nov 2015 · Points: 0

I can't speak to the overboot you are ordering...But, back in '97, I used my heavy duty hiking boots with lightly insulated overboot/gaiters (that fit completely over all of my boot--to the toes--similar to the K2 Superlight on 40 Below's website). I had no problem. This was on the normal route, in summer, with decent weather, and I don't tend to have problems with cold feet. YMMV. Jeremy's suggestions sound good, too. I assume you have appropriate crampons that will work with whatever boot/overboot combo you decide to wear.

EDIT: To clarify, the overboot I used was more like an insulated gaiter. It went up below the knee, covered the entire top of the boot including the toes, but left the bottom of the boot open. I used strapon hinged crampons with no issue. My hiking boots were heavy duty leather. 

Hannah-Grace Kelley · · denver, co · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 0

As of now, I plan on purchasing these overboots from 40 Below... https://www.40below.com/products_detail.php?ProductID=3 ... the K2 Superlights. 

Allen Sanderson · · Oootah · Joined Jul 2007 · Points: 1,146

Those overboot will not be appropriate as except for a few places you are not going to be on snow or wearing crampons. These are full coverage overboots so there is insulation under the sole. You could wear them but you will just trash them walking on rocks. You want a supergaitor like the one made by Mtn. Tools. 

That said I have used these overboots and would otherwise recommend them if you were going to be on snow.

Brian in SLC · · Sandy, Utah · Joined Oct 2003 · Points: 14,421

Sounds like your trying to make up for a poor boot choice by adding an overboot....

Just buy a used double boot?

If you're just doing the standard route on that big windy pile of dirt, you might still want to be able to use a binding crampon especially if the upper mountain is icy.  A standard double boot will be much better especially one that has the ability to take a binding crampon.

That pumice is really hard on gear...any overboot you walk in will be trashed.  And, unless you want to strap a crampon on, they'll be terrible to walk on rock with as well.

Overboots are really designed for snow/ice routes where you'll be wearing a crampon full time, IMHO.

Hannah-Grace Kelley · · denver, co · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 0

No, it's not because of a poor boot choice. I have had these Scarpa boots for 3+ years. It is because I cannot find double boots in my size... I am a women's size 5. La Sportiva even runs small... and I cannot fit into a men's size 37 of that. 

Klimbien · · St.George Orem Denver Vegas · Joined Apr 2009 · Points: 480
Hannah-Grace Kelley wrote:

No, it's not because of a poor boot choice. I have had these Scarpa boots for 3+ years. It is because I cannot find double boots in my size... I am a women's size 5. La Sportiva even runs small... and I cannot fit into a men's size 37 of that. 

I lived in Chile for a total of about 3 years, it was my experience that everything needed was available for rent. Kinda risky, you never know what is going to happen and its hard to leave something so important to chance, but it is a very feasible option. The sizing shouldn't be an issue, most Chileans have small feet and a women's size 5 would be very common. Good luck, hope your climb is successful. Be sure to eat the completos and empanadas de carne y acetun. Pick pockets in the city are just as bad as Barcelona, watch your six, anyone crowding/rushing you is trying to rob you. 

Kyle Tarry · · Portland, OR · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 175
Hannah-Grace Kelley wrote:

I'll be wearing a Scarpa Charmoz Pro GTX under the overboot... do you think that'd work? 

To be clear, not only is the Charmoz not a double boot, it is very much on the light, uninsulated, and cold end of the spectrum for single boots.  Not all single boots are alike, and the Charmoz is one of the least warm you can buy without going to something like a mid approach shoe.  I use them for summer alpine climbing, and they are very, very much less warm than a decent single boot (I use Phantom Guides).

If you think that double boots may be necessary (I haven't been up Aconcagua, so I don't know, but that seems to be the consensus), trying to get away with a single boot is one thing, but trying to get away with a Charmoz is another thing entirely.

There is some good boot info here: http://www.cosleyhouston.com/aconcagua-eq-list.htm

Climbing boots — You'll need warm boots. Aconcagua can be a very cold mountain. The best choice is a pair of the modern climbing boots designed for colder weather (but not 8000 meter peaks). As examples see Sportiva Spantik, Baruntse or Batura Evoboots. In the Scarpa line look at the Phantom 6000, or the Phantom Guide. Or Scarpa's somewhat less expensive range of plastic double boots, the Omega, Inverno or Koflach Degre.

You could also use a good single mountaineering boot, such as the Sportiva Nepal Evo, if you also include an insulated supergaiter (see below). Be careful, however, as frostbite is a common and serious issue on Aconcagua.

Insulated Supergaiters — Supergaiters are gaiters that come down all the way to the sole of the boot, but do not cover the sole. You'll need these only if your boots are of similar warmth to the Sportiva Nepal Evo. Mountain Tools makes one such gaiter. Be warned, however, that supergaiters are difficult to get on your boots, and also tend to pop off the toes with use. They are not an ideal solution. A better solution is to simply buy a warmer boot.

Note that overboots, which cover the sole of the boot, are not acceptable, as most of the time we are walking on rock and you'll need your rubber lugged soles exposed.

Bill Kirby · · Baltimore Maryland · Joined Jul 2012 · Points: 480

Have you visited Neptune’s or Bent gate? I would check with them and see what they can do for you.

Beean · · Canmore, AB · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 0
Kyle Tarry wrote:

To be clear, not only is the Charmoz not a double boot, it is very much on the light, uninsulated, and cold end of the spectrum for single boots.  Not all single boots are alike, and the Charmoz is one of the least warm you can buy without going to something like a mid approach shoe.  I use them for summer alpine climbing, and they are very, very much less warm than a decent single boot (I use Phantom Guides).

If you think that double boots may be necessary (I haven't been up Aconcagua, so I don't know, but that seems to be the consensus), trying to get away with a single boot is one thing, but trying to get away with a Charmoz is another thing entirely.

There is some good boot info here: http://www.cosleyhouston.com/aconcagua-eq-list.htm

This guy said it. A leather hiking boot is probably warmer than a Charmoz. My house slippers are probably warmer.

Get a Mont Blanc/Nepal/Mamook/whatever single boot fits you best and overboot/superultragaiter that. OB's/SG's work, but you have to have something half decent to start with. 

Dave Bn · · Fort Collins, CO · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 10

Do you even need a full or 3/4 shank mountaineering boot for Aconcagua?  

What about a warmer winter hiking boot from Vasque or the like.  I didn't get higher than white rocks when i was there, but I don't remember having anticipated much in the way of steep snow that would necesitate a rigid soled boot.

Your feet will get cold but tech is minimal, Warm boots and strapons will probably be better than single leathers + super gaitor.

Brian in SLC · · Sandy, Utah · Joined Oct 2003 · Points: 14,421
Dave Bn wrote:

Do you even need a full or 3/4 shank mountaineering boot for Aconcagua?  

What about a warmer winter hiking boot from Vasque or the like.  I didn't get higher than white rocks when i was there, but I don't remember having anticipated much in the way of steep snow that would necesitate a rigid soled boot.

Your feet will get cold but tech is minimal, Warm boots and strapons will probably be better than single leathers + super gaitor.

The canaleta, right before the summit, can be icy.  At a minimum.  Or worse.  Heckuva long ways to go to not have the correct gear.  Plus, if you get stuck out in poor weather, being slow, or due to darkness (etc), you'll want your feet to stay warm.

Also depends on which route and which side of the mountain.  Polish Glacier side is way snowy/icier.  But still, the worst conditions on the "normal" route would usually be right before the summit.

Caleb Mallory · · Seattle, Wa · Joined Jun 2015 · Points: 425

Hey HG! Stoked that you're taking on Aconcagua, I have a close friend who speaks highly of the K2 Superlights from winter camping experiences, not so much for more technical purposes. Jeremy's advice of proper hydration and keeping your feet dry goes a very long way in keeping yourself warm as possible. Ideally a double boot set up is what you'd want but  an overboot should do the trick if paired with a single. Have you looked at the women LS Nepal cubes possibly? Ive taken my pair up above 6000m and with the right layering system my feet stayed warm. You could also look into a pair of plastics to wear once your at the higher camps and only use the charmozs down low. Hope your trip goes well!  

Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 322

The Women’s La Sportiva Nepal Cube comes in 36. That with an added supergaiter *could* be okay if you really manage your warmth properly. That may be your best bet. You may also want to look at non-mountaineering specific boots. 

Mountain Rookie · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2017 · Points: 0
Hannah-Grace Kelley wrote:

La Sportiva even runs small... and I cannot fit into a men's size 37 of that. 

Aaaand have you tried sizes 38, 39? This german retailer has them in stock and it's on sale: https://www.globetrotter.de/shop/la-sportiva-spantik-127929-grey-yellow/?sku=127929018 If they don't ship to US, you could get them through a shipping proxy. In your country they go for >700USD so if they don't fit, you should be able to sell them without any losses.

Edit: maybe I misunderstood you and you meant that LS size 37 is already too big for you, if this is the case, have a look at Boreal G1 Lite and Lowa 6000 RD, they seem to start from sizes 5 and 4.5, respectively. No idea where you could find these across the pond, but you can try contacting the manufacturer, they're pretty responsive and helpful in my experience.

Jordan W · · NC · Joined Mar 2017 · Points: 30

Sportiva makes the G2 SM and the new G5's in a size 37... Those might get close. I know a few women who wear size 39 Scarpa 6000's that like them a lot.... The Charmoz are light boots to have at almost 7000m. I've heard the rock on the approach and the lower part of the route tear boots up big time. 

+1 for the boreal recommendation, they make pretty small sizes.

Jonathan Dull · · Boone, NC · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 405

I was climbing in the Mercedario Group a couple years ago (up to around 21,500') and was glad to have double boots for our early starts up high. If your feet naturally run cold I would invest in some double boots. There's plently of shops in Mendoza that rent double plastic boots but I'm not sure the cost or if they have really small sizes. 

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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