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Another mountaineering boot thread


Original Post
Briggs Lazalde · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2017 · Points: 0

Tried on some la sportiva nepal cubes today in my size 42... Forefoot was pretty good maybe .5 size down would feel better... Instep was tight and uncomfy even after adjusting laces...heel had a ton of slop... I hear the arcteryx acrux AR are the boot to go with for my shape of foot... Anyone tried multiple boots on and have real world experience to offer input? Like to choose a lightweight boot for baker rainier and possibly hitting technical WI in hyalite canyon...can I find 1 boot to do it all that'll fit properly or should I try 2 different boots for both mountaineering and technical ice?

Briggs Lazalde · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2017 · Points: 0

Maybe I can go with one of the many boots and modify them with inserts to fit better in certain places? Stuff is overwhelming.. Too many options

Skibo · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 5

Try some Scarpas.  They should be easier to find than the Arcteryx anyway.  

Mountain Rookie · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2017 · Points: 0

Briggs Lazalde wrote:

Instep was tight and uncomfy even after adjusting laces...

Have you tried adjusting the tongue? Heel and forefoot fit suggests that you indeed would need to go at least .5 size down. Make sure you're trying them with heavy socks.

Skibo · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 5

Also if you have have instep problems, take some insoles which work for you into the shop for fitting.

Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 326

The Nepals have a tongue insert that pretty dramatically changes the fit of the boot, in my opinion at least.  Insoles also dramatically change the boot fit.  The best thing is if you can go to a place and try on a lot of boots and a lot of insoles.  If you have a well stocked REI in your location, it's a great place to do that.  

There are a lot of boots that will fit what you are looking for.  The Nepal Cube is a great option that I have climbed Baker and Rainier with, while also using them for WI.  The G5s are the fancier version which are what I use now.  Scarpa has the Mont Blanc and Phantom Tech options which are pretty similar in function as well.

Beean · · Canmore, AB · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 0

Mountain Rookie wrote:

 Make sure you're trying them with heavy socks.

Or, try them with a thin, comfortable sock.

You'll get a better fit which will be more comfortable and you can let that expensive boot you just bought keep your feet warm instead of a sock. 

Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 326

Beean wrote:

Or, try them with a thin, comfortable sock.

You'll get a better fit which will be more comfortable and you can let that expensive boot you just bought keep your feet warm instead of a sock. 

+1 to this.  I much prefer using a fitted medium weight sock instead of a big ol' loose wool sock in mountain boots.  Especially on multiday climbs, big socks get matted and bunched.  You don't want to be depending on them for your boot to fit right.

Bill Kirby · · Baltimore Maryland · Joined Jul 2012 · Points: 480

 One boot or two? Does this fit? What kind of socks ? Get fitted for boots from a reputable shop. Yea you might spend more money but you’ll get the right answers AND the right fit.

Briggs Lazalde · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2017 · Points: 0

Bill Kirby wrote:

 One boot or two? Does this fit? What kind of socks ? Get fitted for boots from a reputable shop. Yea you might spend more money but you’ll get the right answers AND the right fit.

Yea REI here has 1 full shank model so I dont bother with them. Mountaingear is located here however and that's where I went to try some on. La sportiva weren't great and I was told scarpas will fit very similar to la sportiva. Just looking at the boots and comparing side by side they were almost identical in certain models so fit is probably similar. Someone mentioned the mont bloncs and I'm still very keen on lighter.. The mont bloncs are 1lb+ heavier between the pair than the rebel pros which I'm eyeing.. Now I am somewhat leaning toward 2 different pairs for the occasions. Interested in the scarpa rebel pro ice comp boots for dedicated ice climbing with some modifications to help fit better if they fit similar to other scarpa. And for baker I was thinking rebel pro gtx or, like the salomon XA trail runners I have and almost feel like would be capable of baker with strap on crampons,  bump up to the salomon Xalps which are a bit beefier. I know people have done rainier in these boots so they are capable and I do love how lightweight they are. My roomie has a pair of the Xalps so I've felt how light they are they're just not super insulated and I'm not sure if need much insulation. During my night hikes through deep snow in my XAs my toes stayed warm. I generally do keep moving though and wear wool socks...I kno this is a lot my apologies... So Basicly I have options but I don't want to spend 3000 on a quiver of boots 

Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 326

Sportiva and Scarpa have very different fits, at least in my opinion. Even boots within the same brand often have different fits. Mountain Gear’s online store has one of the best selections and I pretty regularly buy boots from them. If they have all of those boots in the store, they probably have one of the biggest boot selections in the world. Just ask to pretty much try everything on. 

I wouldn’t recommend the XAlp as somebody’s first boot or one-quiver boot whatsoever. The boots I mentioned in my above post are often used as beginner and one-quiver boots. Just try them all on and see what fits. The G5 has a pretty versatile adjustment system instead of laces, so that could be a winner for you. You definitely don’t need to spend 3k on boots either. With just the G5 you can climb pretty much everything in the continental USA.

As for climbing Baker in trail runners, that’s not a good idea. Sure Ueli could have pulled it off, probably some AAI guides as well. However, you really want to start with the proper gear and begin stripping weight as your experience grows, not vice versa. 

Kevin Mcbride · · Nelson · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 160

If the nepal cube gave your instep problems then the acrux ar will be MUCH worse. 

Kuntor · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2016 · Points: 15

Nepals plus a superfeet insole minus the extra tongue work beautifully for me - and that was after I thought they'd work great stock with the tongue. What I've heard though is if you need extra toe box then go with scarpa phantoms (my feet are slightly narrow, so I never get blisters there). One of those three options should do you fine without having to go way off the beaten path

Briggs Lazalde · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2017 · Points: 0

I appreciate the feedback guys. Good looking out. Figured it out and got 2 pairs I'm gonna try. One for technical one for mountaineering. 

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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