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Best kind of crag dog?


Original Post
Kurt G. · · Reading, PA · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 150

So I know there is a lot of hate on here about people bringing their dogs to the crag and a lot of times I have to agree with the rantings due to the fact of irresponsible pet owners. that aside I would like to get a dog in the near future and I am reaching out to find out from those of you who do own and crag your dogs (and who are responsible with them) what types are best.  are there any breeds, sizes, warning signs, etc. to keep an eye out for.  basically what dogs in your experience have the best demeanor to be good crag dogs? 

And please don't use this as a jump off to complain about dogs at the crag.

Thanks

Dead Head · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2017 · Points: 65

Mutts

BigB · · Red Rock, NV · Joined Feb 2015 · Points: 340

ACD(red or blue heelers)

Eric Engberg · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2009 · Points: 0

rescues

Jon Frisby · · Colorado Springs, CO · Joined Feb 2013 · Points: 120

hounds

amarius · · Nowhere, OK · Joined Feb 2012 · Points: 20
cragmantoo · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 175
Kurt G. wrote:

 

And please don't use this as a jump off to complain about dogs at the crag.

Thanks

LOL, good luck with that...

Matt Clay · · Estill County, KY · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 1,051

Hunting beagles usually have a good effect on crag psyche in my experience.

JohnReg · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 15

None.

Roy Suggett · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 7,569

Rescues less than 40 lb.s, athletic, obedient, soft spoken, non aggressive (except for vermin trying to chew through your pack) and trained to wait long periods of time, and knows what "rock" and "rope" means when shouted.  Yes, this is realistic but takes the right dog and lots of training. 

Jeremy Almond · · Las Vegas · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 1,601

My buddy's blue heeler is pretty good. Very athletic, we never have to carry him through anything. 

But more importantly is training and discipline. Do a search on the easiest dogs to train. Some breeds have more tendency to only have to be given a command once.

I believe heelers rate high.

Lena chita · · OH · Joined Mar 2011 · Points: 806

Think of the dogs that make the best service dogs -- i.e. they have intelligence and good temperament: Labs or Retrievers, Poodles, German shepherd, etc. The list is long, but that's the basic idea. And then look for mutts/rescues that have a lot of those breeds in them.

But IMO the most important thing is how you socialize them.

SeƱor Arroz · · LA, CA · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 10

Mellow dogs. The problem with dogs at crags is that their people go up routes and the poor dogs stress out at the bottom. Hence whining and barking and howling. Not good for anyone.

I have a lab. I only take her to the crag if I'm on a trip and MUST bring her with me. She's mellow and tends to go to sleep and not bug people. That's the kind of dog you want. 

Colonel Mustard · · Sacramento, CA · Joined Sep 2005 · Points: 1,186

Ima strang up yer dawg!

s.price · · Pagosa Springs · Joined Dec 2010 · Points: 1,346

A well trained one. If you can't put in the time required no dog is a good crag dog. I have had multiple breeds over the years and they have all been great. A dog will get away with what it is allowed to. I can take mine into any social situation with confidence because of the hours I have put in to insure predictable behavior.

Great crag dogs are a product of responsible caring and committed owners. I lean towards herding breeds. They want nothing more but to serve and are easy to train.


Andrew Smith · · Dallas, TX · Joined Mar 2014 · Points: 60

It is beyond obnoxious when owners bring their dogs to the crag, I have seen multiple instances where dogs have gotten into fights, bark incessantly, and more seriously, belayers almost being knocked over by dogs running around. Nothing worse than being 50 ft. up and seeing your belayer dodge a running dog. Naturally this a reflection on the terrible owner rather than the dog itself, but my vote would be no dogs. 

sean o · · Northern, NM · Joined Oct 2012 · Points: 20

A greyhound, preferably a rescue.  Keep it leashed so it doesn't go off after a varmint, and it will be happy to curl up on a blanket and wait.  In my experience, they also seem to be mellow around strange people.

Bill Kirby · · Baltimore Maryland · Joined Jul 2012 · Points: 480

 In my experience breed doesn’t make a difference it’s whether the crag is empty or crowded and whether you spend time with your dog or not.

 


Kyle Elliott · · Everett, WA · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 775

Norwegian lundehund. They have special feet for climbing. Plus they are super rare, so you probably won't even have it. 

cragmantoo · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 175
Andrew Smith wrote:

It is beyond obnoxious when owners bring their dogs to the crag, I have seen multiple instances where dogs have gotten into fights, bark incessantly, and more seriously, belayers almost being knocked over by dogs running around. Nothing worse than being 50 ft. up and seeing your belayer dodge a running dog. Naturally this a reflection on the terrible owner rather than the dog itself, but my vote would be no dogs. 

Didn't see this coming, did ya? : )

Mike Lofgren · · Brighton · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 90

We have a 6 month old German Shepard, purebred. She's been out with us 4-5 times and has been great. 

Our breeder specializes in breeding for temperament and health. She's very mellow. Loves people and crowds.

We keep her on a runner (for the foreseeable future, she's a puppy and semi trained at this point) at all times and we're always within view. She doesn't bark.

She'll only join us on single pitch crag days. Not fair to other climbers, or her, to leave her unattended while we're on multipitch.

We focused on temperament and did our best to ensure we got a mellow and friendly (and smart, trainable, and militantly obedient!) dog. My advice would be to not get a puppy unless you meet the parents (we met both), because the mother is a good predictor of personality. If you can't meet the parents, buy a shelter mutt/dog with a gentle disposition, no aggression towards strangers or other dogs, and has low separation anxiety.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

General Climbing
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