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Scarpa Inverno + LS Baruntse liner?


Original Post
Mountain Rookie · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2017 · Points: 0

Hi!

I'm pretty new to mountaineering, have a few 14-ers in my bag, now I'd like to try myself on higher mountains in the Andes and I'm looking for the most suitable pair of boots. In my area the only kind I'm seeing in shops are the latest, shiniest supergaiters, but I'm concerned about their durability (especially in the rocky Andes...). Also, wouldn't want to spend that kind of money at this point.

I'm thinking of getting a used pair of Scarpa Inverno plastic doubles, and throwing out the stock liners (getting rid of all the germs and concerns that being overused and compressed, they don't insulate like they should), and getting a brand new, heat moldable La Sportiva Baruntse liners that would also get me the perfect fit. (No way to try them on before buying, but owning/having tried on several Scarpa and LS boots, I have a rough idea of the needed size).

Anyone tried this combo? Any opinions/suggestion on my approach..?

Any advice is appreciated, pls show some love for a noob, htx!   

C J · · Sac Valley, CA · Joined Jun 2017 · Points: 0

Why the choice of the Baruntse liner versus an Intuition option?

Mountain Rookie · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2017 · Points: 0
C J wrote:

Why the choice of the Baruntse liner versus an Intuition option?

I don't know much about either, but at least I have some experience with LS sizing, that might save me some PITA. I did a quick googling, it seems to me that most Intuition liners are more expensive. Is there anything special about them? If my first couple of 5-6k-ers go well and I decide to push for Aconcagua, Denali and the like, I might open up my wallet, but at this point quality/performance is not that much a concern.   

csproul · · Davis, CA · Joined Dec 2009 · Points: 325

Do yourself a favor and try any modern boot (think Baruntse, Spantik or similar) and compare to the Inverno. IMO, I don't now why anyone would use true plastic doubles like the Inverno anymore. Sure they're cheaper, but when put in perspective of the time, effort, an money spent to go climb in the Andes or any other continent, the cost is well worth it. They're as warm or warmer, more flexible, way more comfortable, and easier to walk and climb  in. Also beware of old plastics, I have witnessed the plastic cracking and the boots become worthless. IMO boots are one place where going cheap is not worth it, and this is coming from someone who is missing digits and has permanently numb toes due to frostbite. Also keep in mind that it may be possible to find used boots and that resale of a modern boot is also easier. 

Mountain Rookie · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2017 · Points: 0
csproul wrote:

Do yourself a favor and try any modern boot (think Baruntse, Spantik or similar) and compare to the Inverno. IMO, I don't now why anyone would use true plastic doubles like the Inverno anymore. Sure they're cheaper, but when put in perspective of the time, effort, an money spent to go climb in the Andes or any other continent, the cost is well worth it. They're as warm or warmer, more flexible, way more comfortable, and easier to walk and climb  in. Also beware of old plastics, I have witnessed the plastic cracking and the boots become worthless. IMO boots are one place where going cheap is not worth it, and this is coming from someone who is missing digits and has permanently numb toes due to frostbite. Also keep in mind that it may be possible to find used boots and that resale of a modern boot is also easier. 

Hey csproul, thanks for the input! Yeah, the Baruntses would have been my first choice, but currently they're out of production (at least till february), and none of the retailers here in Europe seem to have my size. The rest of boots in this category (LS Spantic, Boreal G1 Lite, Zamberlan Karka Evo RR, any other, non-supergaiter options out there..?) seem to be even more difficult to come by. This idea with old plastic double with brand new liner came to me couple of days ago, and damn, I felt so smart!   I thought a ducttape would also help me in the old plastic breaking scenario to get back to safety...

Your comment pulled me back to reality. Yeah I'd need to invest a lot of time and money to find a proper boot, but it would be unwise to cut corners in my case and take extra risks to save a few hundred bucks... You might have saved my life lol! Thanks again!  

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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