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Approach ski rig


Original Post
Petsfed · · Laramie, WY · Joined Mar 2002 · Points: 915

I've got a set of silvretta bindings that fit my Nepal Cubes really well. They're just attached to some super old Tua skia. I want to get a set of lighter, more shaped skis, that have fish-scales on them, for longer approaches. I plan on getting climbing skins too, but my experience touring on skins vs scales is that for all but the steepest hills, fish scales win. Any suggestions on the best ski that fits that bill? I looked at the rossignol bc125s. I know Fischer has something similar, but I don't recall what.

To be clear, I already have a Tele-rig that I use for downhill and backcountry stuff, and a cross-country rig that I use for just touring. I am not too concerned about downhill performance, but I do want enough shape to the ski that I'm not fighting to turn it like I do with my cross-country gear, and I don't want to carry an extra pair of boots.

Cireously · · Bozeman, MT · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 15

Check out the Altai Skis 

andyedwards · · Jackson, WY · Joined Aug 2009 · Points: 205

Voile Vector BC?

Mike McL · · South Lake Tahoe, CA · Joined Dec 2007 · Points: 1,480

Voile Objective BC 

clint helander · · anchorage, alaska · Joined Dec 2007 · Points: 611

If you think scales beat skins, I have to think that you haven't approached a lot of ice that requires real approaches. Scales are great for approach skis and I think that's a great plan, but you're going to want skins, too. As soon as terrain gets icy (after cycles of freeze/thaw) scales are useless. If it's over about 20-degrees, scales just won't cut it. The Vector BCs are awesome (go with a shorter ski for approaches than typical BC skis), so are the Rossignol BC scaled skis. Both have great shape and the scales work when the angle is low. I've brought them up on Denali, into the Canadian Rockies, Cascades, etc.



Ben Stabley · · Portland, OR · Joined Sep 2014 · Points: 167

G3 also has some scaled BC skis which might interest you.

Petsfed · · Laramie, WY · Joined Mar 2002 · Points: 915
Petsfed wrote:

I've got a set of silvretta bindings that fit my Nepal Cubes really well. They're just attached to some super old Tua skia. I want to get a set of lighter, more shaped skis, that have fish-scales on them, for longer approaches. I plan on getting climbing skins too, but my experience touring on skins vs scales is that for all but the steepest hills, fish scales win. Any suggestions on the best ski that fits that bill? I looked at the rossignol bc125s. I know Fischer has something similar, but I don't recall what.

To be clear, I already have a Tele-rig that I use for downhill and backcountry stuff, and a cross-country rig that I use for just touring. I am not too concerned about downhill performance, but I do want enough shape to the ski that I'm not fighting to turn it like I do with my cross-country gear, and I don't want to carry an extra pair of boots.

Clint, i don’t like being a jerk, so i’m just going to quote my original post, with the only change being the bold.

The local shop has Fischer skis, so that’s what i’m going with. The s-bound 125 is about 2 pounds heavier, but about half the price of the voile. Rossignols seem to be comparable in price, but only about half a pound lighter per pair than the Fischer’s.

Beean · · Canmore, AB · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 0

Lots of camber on the Fischers, could be a little dicey getting down without lateral stiffness in your boot. I have heard good things about the Voiles.

I'm sure you already know this but some may not.

Some people tie a cord to the tips of their skis and then to their knees to keep them forward when descending. Looks terrifying but buddies say it works. 

Jacon · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2013 · Points: 200

Never enough opportunities to bring these things up: http://www.alpcontrol.com/carac.html

JohnnyG · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 10
Jacon wrote:

Never enough opportunities to bring these things up: http://www.alpcontrol.com/carac.html

Jacon - do those things really work? 


Seriously though, which modern AT bindings do work with ice climbing boots? My dad has an old (1980's) pair of Ramer bindings. They kind of suck. But I did ski half of denali with them :-)

Beean · · Canmore, AB · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 0
JohnnyG wrote:

Jacon - do those things really work? 


Seriously though, which modern AT bindings do work with ice climbing boots? My dad has an old (1980's) pair of Ramer bindings. They kind of suck. But I did ski half of denali with them :-)

None. Until manufacturers start putting tech inserts into ice boots your only option is silverettas, bringing two pairs or climbing in a rando boot (which isn't so bad for non mushroomed routes). 

Jacon · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2013 · Points: 200

I have no idea if they work.  I just think they're batshit crazy.  

Bill Kirby · · Baltimore Maryland · Joined Jul 2012 · Points: 480

Splitboard and mountaineering boots work well you bunch of two plankers!

Eric and Lucie · · Boulder, CO · Joined Oct 2004 · Points: 140
Beean wrote:

None. Until manufacturers start putting tech inserts into ice boots your only option is silverettas, bringing two pairs or climbing in a rando boot (which isn't so bad for non mushroomed routes). 

La Sportiva Nepal Tops in Fritschi Diamir bindings (back in 2004)... we did not do any real downhill though!

Jacon · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2013 · Points: 200
Beean wrote:

None. Until manufacturers start putting tech inserts into ice boots your only option is silverettas, bringing two pairs or climbing in a rando boot (which isn't so bad for non mushroomed routes). 

Or getting tech inserts installed in your climbing boots 

Beean · · Canmore, AB · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 0
Eric and Lucie wrote:

La Sportiva Nepal Tops in Fritshci Diamir bindings (back in 2004)... we did not do any real downhill though!

Well if we're doing that.. how about drilling a little hole in the toes and heels of your ice boots to enjoy tech goodness!

cdawg lion · · BeaUTAHfull · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 71

i've used some fischer 88s and they've been great! never needed anything more than fishscale for the approaches 

Doug S · · W Pa · Joined Apr 2012 · Points: 55

I have the Rossignol bc 125's fitted with Fritschi Eagle bindings. There's a little camber on the skis. The bindings work great with ice climbing boots.

clint helander · · anchorage, alaska · Joined Dec 2007 · Points: 611

The Fischer S-bounds are good, but I can attest to the fact that the Rossignol BC125s are better. That's what I have, in the 165cm length. The S-bounds are a little softer than the BC125s. I've done a lot of pure skiing in my 125s and I love them. Just my two cents...if choosing between the Fischers and Rossignols...go Rossignol. The Voiles are awesome, but definitely more expensive and probably not really all that better if going short. They have the best base, but that may not be a deciding factor based on the several hundred dollar price difference.



Steven Kovalenko · · Calgary · Joined May 2014 · Points: 25

Budget for lots and lots of blister tape for your heels, and tape before you even feel a hot spot.  It will happen skinning in climbing boots.

Also, the knee cord tip is legit.  You can ride backseat and actually control your skis.

DavisMeschke Guillotine · · Pinedale, WY · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 215

If you go the Rossi BC 125 route, just know that they aren't meant to be mounted with any kind of AT binding. It's still a XC ski and has a very supple core; if you take a weird fall or try to ski anything too crazy, there's a good chance the binding will rip out. I've seen these skis come into the shop, and once the binding rips out, there's not much you can do to repair it; also, Rossi will not warranty them.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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