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Home wall addition advice


Original Post
Eric K · · Washington · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 45

I am getting ready to add an addition to my garage gym. Currently I have a tension board and want some lower angle terrain to compliment it. My main goal is to add easier terrain to do my ARC or LBC on, also it will really help my wife to have more easy terrain. I was wanting a 12' 20 degree wall and my max height it 10' 6". I am also trying to work around a beam that runs along the length of my garage. If I am just making a basic 20 degree wall I can have the top end either 5" or 1' from the beam depending on how large of a kick board I make. I am concerned about that beam getting in the way which is getting me interested in more creative option like having the 20 degree wall come down just on the other side of the beam, and then connecting it with a short 40 section to connect it to the wall. Here is the mockup of what I am thinking, sorry I cannot figure out how to get big photos on here...


I love this idea cause it seems like a cool way to get some extra terrain and with a sit start my wife could still start with her hands on the 20 degree wall. If I did do this I would likely notch out the 2x6 so that it could sit in flush against the beam which would drop the angle of the little 40 degree section to about 38 degree which is not much but something. Along with standard framing stuff I was planning on putting a 3/4" OSB brace on both sides of the joint to help stiffen it. I would also likely connect this to the wall behind it at the joint as well. Here are my questions?

is all this extra work worth it's? Or should I just build a standard 20 degree wall?

Will 2 OSB braces and another joist connecting it to the wall be enough to keep this thing from falling apart?

Will notching out the 2x6 to fit right next to the beam weaken it significantly enough for failure?

Any other suggestions?

Eric

Ryan Hamilton · · Orem · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 20

Don't notch the beam, you will compromise it's structural integrity. Just run your 2x4s up to the bottom of the beam and use the beam as part of the wall. Some metal joist hangers will connect it all nicely. That part of the wall will be vertical, but it will just be top finishing holds so it doesn't really matter. 

With a 20 degree wall you shouldn't need a kick plate anyway. when it's overhanging a lot then  you really do want one just so you can get your feet on. I't doesn't waist wall space, just makes it easier to get your feet on.

Eric K · · Washington · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 45

If I go directly from the beam to the floor my angle will be closer to 30 which is too steep. If I come down directly off the beam (like you suggest) at 20 degree and add a 4' 40 degree section to attache it to the floor do you think I will need an additional brace at the joint connecting it to the back wall of my structure?

Ryan Hamilton · · Orem · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 20
Eric K wrote:

If I go directly from the beam to the floor my angle will be closer to 30 which is too steep. If I come down directly off the beam (like you suggest) at 20 degree and add a 4' 40 degree section to attache it to the floor do you think I will need an additional brace at the joint connecting it to the back wall of my structure?

I think you would need additional bracing. I've done some framing, but mostly just walls/doors/windows, so I'm an expert by no means. What if you just kicked the bottom out away from the wall and went straight up to the bottom of the beam so the front of the 2x4 was flush with the beam. You would need to brace the bottom from the wall, or more preferably into the floor to keep things solid and steady but that would let you keep the 20 degrees that you want. 

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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