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What bolt is this?


Original Post
C. Williams · · the Climber Cave · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 1,152

Looking to find out the brand and if anyone has used these. Considering they were in a bag of random climbing hardware bits I would like to find out as much as possible before deciding to use. All I can tell is that they are 3-3/4" in length and are possibly 304 stainless.

One of the bolts in question.

With a Hilti KB3 for comparison.

Alan Collins · · Bend, OR · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 1,286

I'd trust it for rappelling since there's always 2 bolts at an anchor with equatention, but I wouldn't set people up to take lead falls on a mystery bolt. I've never seen that bolt but I've seen a lot like it that work great. I haven't seen that gold color in wedge bolts I'm fimiliar with

IcePick · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2017 · Points: 100

So apparently they do cad plate 304 SS.  Run a magnet over them.  The magnet will either very lightly grab or not grab the SS because of the nickel and cadnium content

C. Williams · · the Climber Cave · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 1,152

The gold color is just the crap light in my garage. More or less standard stainless coloring. I'm looking for more specific info such as manufacturer, ultimate load values, specified torque value, ect. Also it would be great to know if there are any known reliability issues as not all wedge anchors are equal.

IcePick · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2017 · Points: 100

Tightening torque. 45 ft lb

ultimate tension.  3450 lb

ultimate shear.  4135 lb

source.  Redhead

nbrown · · western NC --> Broomfield, CO · Joined Nov 2007 · Points: 6,132

Looks like the simpson strong tie bolts that I have used (although the picture on their website is different). They're pretty junky bolts that are only decent in bullet hard rock. The hilti is a far superior bolt, with better clip engagement (grips hole better) and stamped threads (stronger ).

C. Williams · · the Climber Cave · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 1,152
IcePick wrote:

source.  Redhead

Not redheads.

This might help.

Left to right: Powers SD4, Powers Power stud, Redhead Trubolt, Simpson Strong-Tie Wedge All, Hilti KB3, ??? bolt.

I pay very close attention to the hardware I install and record what I used where in case any reliability issues develop in the future. 

Ken Noyce · · Layton, UT · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 2,249

It looks to me like it could be a CONFAST wedge bolt (based on the aggressive clip nubs).  https://www.concretefasteners.com/3-8-x-3-3-4-stainless-steel-wedge-anchor

Jason Halladay · · Los Alamos, NM · Joined Oct 2005 · Points: 12,044
Ken Noyce wrote:

It looks to me like it could be a CONFAST wedge bolt (based on the aggressive clip nubs).  https://www.concretefasteners.com/3-8-x-3-3-4-stainless-steel-wedge-anchor

I was going to suggest the same. 

Greg Barnes · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 1,787

Confast is a good guess. The expansion clip on your bolt says 304 so it's a good bet the whole bolt is 304. 

Powers also can have similar clips (although the cone knurls and the printed "3/8 POWERS SS" are different), here is a 316ss Power-Stud from maybe 5 years ago or so. 

nbrown · · western NC --> Broomfield, CO · Joined Nov 2007 · Points: 6,132

Two cheapo brand bolts I have that look very similar but aren't:

The left is (supposedly) a wedge-all. I'm pretty confident in this, but the box they came in is gone. It's overall a poor quality anchor and I definitely won't get any more. The threads cross thread very easily, even at torque specifications, and the clip doesn't set that well either. 

The right is a confast (thunderstud I believe) and works better for hard rock.


They both have similar tension and shear capacities, as well as ~ 25 ft-lbs torque requirements.

C. Williams · · the Climber Cave · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 1,152

So I placed a 3 of these mystery bolts in my test rock (2' x 2' x 18" medium grain granite) and got rather poor results. First off, these bolts have no extended tip to guard against thread damage when tapping them into place, which is not a great design in my opinion. Once all three bolts were delicately driven in, I attempted to torque one to 25 ft-lbs. This resulted in a spinner due to the threads crossing as before the torque was reached. The other two were successfully tightened to 20 ft-lbs, though the threads still crossed and the bolts began to spin as I went to back the nuts off. These are good for the trash can.

Ken Noyce · · Layton, UT · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 2,249
C. Williams wrote:

So I placed a 3 of these mystery bolts in my test rock (2' x 2' x 18" medium grain granite) and got rather poor results. First off, these bolts have no extended tip to guard against thread damage when tapping them into place, which is not a great design in my opinion. Once all three bolts were delicately driven in, I attempted to torque one to 25 ft-lbs. This resulted in a spinner due to the threads crossing as before the torque was reached. The other two were successfully tightened to 20 ft-lbs, though the threads still crossed and the bolts began to spin as I went to back the nuts off. These are good for the trash can.

Threads can't magically cross when you are tightening a bolt, they either start crossed, or they aren't crossed.  Most likely, the stainless started galling and seized up on itself.

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 490
Ken Noyce wrote:

Threads can't magically cross when you are tightening a bolt, they either start crossed, or they aren't crossed.  Most likely, the stainless started galling and seized up on itself.

This is so. Thread galling is a bigger problem with cut/machined threads though you can reduce it by brushing afterwards (an abrasive nylon brush or a polisher). As standard most bolts actually come with a protective coating on them to prevent galling (the slimy feel you get on your hands if you handle a new box of them) but carried and used with the normal care climbers take this can get dusty and they seize up.

Jason Halladay · · Los Alamos, NM · Joined Oct 2005 · Points: 12,044
C. Williams wrote:

So I placed a 3 of these mystery bolts in my test rock (2' x 2' x 18" medium grain granite) and got rather poor results. First off, these bolts have no extended tip to guard against thread damage when tapping them into place, which is not a great design in my opinion. Once all three bolts were delicately driven in, I attempted to torque one to 25 ft-lbs. This resulted in a spinner due to the threads crossing as before the torque was reached. The other two were successfully tightened to 20 ft-lbs, though the threads still crossed and the bolts began to spin as I went to back the nuts off. These are good for the trash can.

Curious. Did you brush and blow the holes out well? 

C. Williams · · the Climber Cave · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 1,152
Ken Noyce wrote:

Threads can't magically cross when you are tightening a bolt, they either start crossed, or they aren't crossed.  Most likely, the stainless started galling and seized up on itself.

True and thanks for correcting and clarifying. Many magical things can happen when posting after a few beers. The threads were definitely machined as the tooling lines are quite prevalent. My guess is that these bolts are a super cheap off brand and they skipped the anti-galling treatment Jim described.

C. Williams · · the Climber Cave · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 1,152
Jason Halladay wrote:

Curious. Did you brush and blow the holes out well? 

Naw, the more dust the better right?!

The holes were brushed with a 1/2" nylon hole brush and blown out with my air compressor.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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