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Tips for a beginner climbing photographer


Original Post
Noam Siegel · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2017 · Points: 0

I'm in the US and have a good opportunity in the next two days to buy gear for much cheaper than my home country.

I'm looking to get into climbing photography and I realize I need to learn basic aid climbing.

What gear should I buy for the very basics of handling a fixed line, and other ways climbing photographers position themselves correctly?

Thx

chris_vultaggio · · The Gunks · Joined Dec 2008 · Points: 485

Hey Noam - a static line, set of ascenders (or single ascender + gri gri), minitraxion, aid ladders (you can use slings but the ladders make things easier), auto daisies (I like the petzl connect - expensive but super functional and easy to use, you can make your own for less using a tibloc etc). A good camera bag is paramount - I use the mountainsmith tourFX (full disclosure I am on their team) for it's security and ease of use on a line. You can access the pack without taking it off (huge plus) fits a wide and long lens (100-400 fits snug) plus a body and a strobe or two.

Comfortable harness is also key - BD big gun is my preference for sitting a while. Bosun seats are also useful if you can snag one. Always take more gear and slings than you think you'll need - aiding over to the right spot is easier if you have enough gear to get you there. Gloves also help ease the abuse on your hands from a lot of jugging.

Most important is knowledge - find someone to show you how to stay safe up there.

Daniel T · · Riverside, Ca · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 35

Been wondering this as well.

Daniel T · · Riverside, Ca · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 35
chris_vultaggio wrote:

Hey Noam - a static line, set of ascenders (or single ascender + gri gri), minitraxion, aid ladders (you can use slings but the ladders make things easier), auto daisies (I like the petzl connect - expensive but super functional and easy to use, you can make your own for less using a tibloc etc). A good camera bag is paramount - I use the mountainsmith tourFX (full disclosure I am on their team) for it's security and ease of use on a line. You can access the pack without taking it off (huge plus) fits a wide and long lens (100-400 fits snug) plus a body and a strobe or two.

Comfortable harness is also key - BD big gun is my preference for sitting a while. Bosun seats are also useful if you can snag one. Always take more gear and slings than you think you'll need - aiding over to the right spot is easier if you have enough gear to get you there. Gloves also help ease the abuse on your hands from a lot of jugging.

Most important is knowledge - find someone to show you how to stay safe up there.

Do you have any tips for where to look online for skills and tips for learning this photography stuff?  I know ill never be in climbing mag but I have a camera and I wouldnt mind trying to get some shots of friends on the next group trip.

Andrew Krajnik · · Plainfield, IL · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 277

Jon Glassberg has some excellent videos up on vimeo. Here's a particularly helpful one:


Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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