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Periodic complete rest


Original Post
John RB · · Superior, CO · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 37

I've seen a lot of climbers talking about taking "complete rest" here and there.  A lot of periodized training has 1-2 weeks of rest at the end of a macro cycle.  Even Ondra says that he takes 2 weeks off every year around Christmas (that's only 1 break per year!).

Do you generally take a complete break from climbing for one or more weeks?  If yes, is it because of life stuff, or is it something built into your training plan?  What is the theory behind this?  Does your body do a deeper repair during this rest break?

caesar.salad · · earth · Joined Dec 2012 · Points: 75

I take around a week off about every 4 months, at the end of every macro cycle. I follow the Rock Prodigy method. I usually end up doing pure slab during it because I can't go more than 2 days before I get antsy.

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530

I don't really train super seriously, but I do tend to take 2 to 4 weeks off a year, depending on how much climbing and training I got in that year. 

For me, my mind and body just stop recovering well from climbing and training. Once that happens, I hit the off switch and do something else for a couple weeks and always come roaring back afterwards. I think it's as good for the psyche as it is for your body to take a break now and then. 

s.price · · the deck of Rover · Joined Dec 2010 · Points: 1,346

I'm with John Wilder on this. My time off usually revolves around sailing or archery season.

Pavel Burov · · Russia · Joined May 2013 · Points: 50

One 4 weeks rest per year. Good for climbing technique (movement programs clean up and become way more efficient). (Not that much) good for body.

Ryan Palo · · Bend, oregon · Joined Aug 2006 · Points: 595

I do 2 weeks normally. Sometimes longer. Like after a long spring season. Just spend my time either skiing or mtn biking during. Then back to the next power phase. 

John RB · · Superior, CO · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 37

Ok, follow up question: how do you fight the jonesing?  

I have a hard time not climbing when I'm psyched... I start feeling down.

Can you turn your motivation off/on at will?

caesar.salad · · earth · Joined Dec 2012 · Points: 75
John RB wrote:

Ok, follow up question: how do you fight the jonesing?  

I have a hard time not climbing when I'm psyched... I start feeling down.

Can you turn your motivation off/on at will?

Climb pure slab.

Parker Wrozek · · Denver, CO · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 81
John RB wrote:

Ok, follow up question: how do you fight the jonesing?  

I have a hard time not climbing when I'm psyched... I start feeling down.

Can you turn your motivation off/on at will?

Go on a trip where it is hard to climb. For me if is 2 weeks in Japan skiing in February. Climbing just will not be happening. 

Ryan Bowen · · Bend, Or · Joined Mar 2017 · Points: 85
s.price wrote:

I'm with John on this. My time off usually revolves around sailing or archery season.

Them elk should be hitting the rut in a few weeks...  

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530
John RB wrote:

Ok, follow up question: how do you fight the jonesing?  

I have a hard time not climbing when I'm psyched... I start feeling down.

Can you turn your motivation off/on at will?

My down time coincides with my psyche dropping off because I just don't feel rested. 

s.price · · the deck of Rover · Joined Dec 2010 · Points: 1,346
Ryan Bowen wrote:

Them elk should be hitting the rut in a few weeks...  

Indeed. Just received a custom recurve I have waited a year for. Stoked. 

JohnRB, I just do the other things mentioned that fire me up.


Lena chita · · Cleveland, OH · Joined Mar 2011 · Points: 745

Yes, usually in summer because it is an off season here. I usually take a couple-weeks-long trip in late June or  early July, after climbing a long spring season. it makes sense to take 2 weeks off after coming back from a trip, and start a new cycle in August.

Ryan Bowen · · Bend, Or · Joined Mar 2017 · Points: 85
s.price wrote:

Indeed. Just received a custom recurve I have waited a year for. Stoked. 



Pics or it didn't happen.



Is there an archery or hunting thread on here?

s.price · · the deck of Rover · Joined Dec 2010 · Points: 1,346

62 inch 58 lb. Riser Hickory and Mahogany. Made by my good friend George Klaus. He has MS so can only work so fast. No thread I know of.
Ryan Bowen · · Bend, Or · Joined Mar 2017 · Points: 85

Stabilizer on a trad bow!  Blaspheme!!!!

evan h · · Denver, CO · Joined Oct 2012 · Points: 330

John, I honestly expected you to be about 23, as those who usually struggle with rest are the early-20's types who have endless psyche. Either way, I fully endorse rest cycles, and I have one about 3 times per year, or about every 4 months. If you don't, I think your body will force it via injury eventually, especially if you err towards harder climbing. If your climbing is mostly moderate, a rest phase is probably not as critical, but if you spend much of your time climbing anywhere near your max, there's only so much your body can handle. Furthermore, 1-2 weeks off helps with plateau-busting and just a better general sense of diversity, allowing you to enjoy other activities (or spend time with neglected loved ones and friends!) as mentioned above. I absolutely am obsessed with climbing, but I just can't go for months and months and expect great results for the foreseeable future. Rest makes it all sustainable.

Steve Pulver · · Williston, ND · Joined Dec 2003 · Points: 455

Some of my recent injuries/finger tweaks have always been in the last week of the performance phase of the Rock Climber's Training Manual schedule. My plan is to cut the performance phase short by one week, take the recommended two week rest and hopefully avoid some injuries.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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