Does anybody use half-draws (dogbone with 1 carabiner) ?


David Deville · · Flagstaff, Arizona · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 40

I did this once for a hard redpoint (hard for me... still just a 5.10). I had the bone pre-clipped to the cams I knew I needed (and wanted that amount of extension). It was nice to just plug and clip, but it was probably more of a mental boost. I doubt the lessened weight mattered; it was the not having to mess with any draws that probably served the most benefit. IMO carrying a dogbone with one biner would be worse than a normal draw because of the fumbling to clip. 

darrell Cornick · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2007 · Points: 5

Genius! We should climb together. I don't use half dogbones but I'll carry a few (4 or 5) short 4 to six inch slings with one lightweight biner to extend cams in addition to some quickdraws. It saves a little weight and maybe the floppyness of the sling helps the cam not walk more than a  rigid draw. I still use draws when it's a desperate stance. 

I usually only bother to do it on routes that are near or at my limit. When climbing near my limit  I think that a bunch of little things add up. It can mean the difference between success and failure. I admit it may just also simply appeal to my idea of aesthetics but there's no harm in that  

I carry even more on big walls. You  cant save enough biners aid climbing. I can can start a pitch with 50 biners and still end up having to put four cams on the same biner by the end of a pitch. 

Serge Smirnov · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 160

Since we're on page 2 anyway, I'll clarify that my goal is to minimize weight on the harness.  Body weight is of little concern for what I climb, but the harness starts feeling uncomfortable between 7 and 10 pounds.  6 extra carabiners isn't a huge difference, but I'd rather use that weight to carry extra protection options.

I do agree with Matt's comment that flipping the dogbone upside down is an opprtunity to drop it.  This seems less of a problem with short runners, so I'm buying short runners.

If people have ideas for minimizing weight on the harness (besides over-the-shoulder slings which I already do, and gear slings which I hate because I climb sub-vertical stuff), I'm interested.  I've even thought about carrying anchor gear in a small backpack, but I suspect it would be a royal pain and I'd be too lazy to ever get it out of there.

David Deville · · Flagstaff, Arizona · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 40
Serge Smirnov wrote:

If people have ideas for minimizing weight on the harness (besides over-the-shoulder slings which I already do, and gear slings which I hate because I climb sub-vertical stuff), I'm interested.  I've even thought about carrying anchor gear in a small backpack, but I suspect it would be a royal pain and I'd be too lazy to ever get it out of there.

You could sew gear loops into your shirt just under the armpits. At least you'd be stylin'.

Eric "Pig" Varley · · Nipomo, CA · Joined Sep 2012 · Points: 25

You could group a number of cams on a single racking biner, similar to racking a set of nuts.  This saves weight by reducing the number of racking biners, while maintain functionality of easily clipping draws to gear.  The downsides are that you can't direct clip cams (if you're in to that kind of thing), and it opens you up to the potential of dropping a significant amount of your rack on a single mistake.

Aleks Zebastian · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 175

climbing friend,

no.

do you even flash?

no.

all your flash are belong to me.

yes.

Serge Smirnov · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 160

Tried multiple cams per biner a few times, with a pretty consistent result.  Works great for the first couple of pitches.  Then the cams gradually acquire their own biners, the alpine draws become over-the-shoulder slings, and it stays like that for the rest of the climb.  I guess it takes too much discipline / effort to restore multiple cams per biner during re-racking, and it's not convenient for the follower to do while climbing.

Kevin Beadle · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 0
Jim Titt wrote:

Am I the only person who just racks the cams I´m likely to use on draws anyway?

nope not alone 

Bobby Howell · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2017 · Points: 0

If you are trying to reduce the wight on your harness, you are probably better off getting lighter stuff than fidgeting with draws while on lead. You can reduce a bit of weight by using lightweight non-lockers on all your cams and draws, buy lightweight cams and take a look at your lockers. Some people like to carry all of the big HMS style lockers. Keep a couple for belay and, clove hitches and rescue scenarios but go with light weight small lockers for any others you might carry. 

You said you wanted the option to be able to carry more gear. One thing to consider is leaving gear behind mid-route before a crux if you know you wont need it to finish. Some routes obviously start wide and then narrow at the top. If you have a good stance, leave big cams you didn't use hanging at the top of the wide stuff for your second to carry the rest of the way. I've only done this once or twice when i realized i didnt need that #4 that was hitting me in the leg while climbing 

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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