Mountain Project Logo

Ice Climbing Gloves


Original Post
DCarey · · Missoula · Joined Aug 2014 · Points: 15

On the hunt for a new pair of gloves for this season. I have been using BD Punishers as well as the Marmot Spring Glove. I like the warmth that comes with the Punisher, but of course you loose dexterity with added insulation and they take a long time to dry out. I like how nimble the Spring Glove is for technical mixed routes and placing pro/building anchors etc. But they get wet easily and once you stop moving your fingers freeze. So I guess I am looking for something in between these two. It does not need to be super warm because at belays I just pull out the thick belay gloves. 

I am currently considering two options. 

Outdoor Research Project Glove: https://www.outdoorresearch.com/us/en/project-gloves/p/2448790001005

Rab Talon Glove: https://rab.equipment/us/accessories-equipment/gloves/talon-glove-4

Does anyone have experience with either of these gloves, or what glove setup has worked best for you? Open to any suggestions and advice. 

NorCalNomad · · San Francisco · Joined Oct 2011 · Points: 105

2 gloves mininum. 

For climbing, the thinnest you can get away with in the conditions the better. Thicker gloves = gripping harder = less blood flow

The golf glove approach for climbing used by a lot of people is very valid. 

Then at least have a belay glove. Extra liners are handy to do a 2.5 system

jon jugenheimer · · Madison, WI · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 2,139

I have been using the BD terminators for as long as I can remember. 

yukonjack · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 15

I used OR stormtracker for ice (with Rab Guide at the belay)...worked good.

Craghead · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 75

I have used the OR Project gloves for one season now and they are currently my go-to glove for leading. A good compromise between dexterity and warmth. Placing screws with them is no problem.

William Kramer · · Kemmerer, WY · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 810

I've been using Camp Gecko Hot for past couple of seasons, they have been a really good "in the middle" glove as far as insulation. Great grip, no barfies as of yet, and hardly any wear or tear.

Ryan Hamilton · · Orem · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 20

I have both the OR and Rab gloves. The OR gloves are my current favorite among the many that I have. The Rab gloves seem kind of stiff or less dexterous, or something. I don't really like them. But, like others have said, you have to have at least 2 pair of gloves because they WILL get wet and freeze. My buddy has the Camp Gecko and really likes them a lot. 

You also want to have a good pair of insulated leather gloves for belaying/rappelling. I have used hardware store gloves in the past with good success. 2 years ago I scored a really good deal on some quality leather ski gloves that are awesome for belaying and rappelling. 

AlpineIce · · Upstate, NY · Joined Mar 2011 · Points: 255

I have the Project Gloves and I feel they're a little too beefy for leading.  They're stuffed with a lot of synthetic insulation - 266 g/m2 on the back of the hand and 60 g/m2 in the palms.

EWilliams · · Truckee, CA · Joined Aug 2014 · Points: 40
Ryan Hamilton · · Orem · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 20
AlpineIce wrote:

I have the Project Gloves and I feel they're a little too beefy for leading.  They're stuffed with a lot of synthetic insulation - 266 g/m2 on the back of the hand and 60 g/m2 in the palms.

I must have a different pair of OR gloves then. Mine have no palm insulation and a little on the back of the hand. Hmmm, I wonder what I have. 

Kyle Tarry · · Portland, OR · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 162

For climbing in moderate temperatures, I have given up on fancy "ice climbing" gloves and I climb almost exclusively in thinner windstopper gloves, like the Seirus OZ.

https://www.seirus.com/windstopper-oz-6574.html

Insulated Kincos work great for belaying and rappeling.

John Vanek · · Gardnerville, NV · Joined May 2013 · Points: 0

Gotta love it; the annual "what glove do you use" question has been opened up! I've gone to $20 leather gloves with Thinsulate from Ace Hardware as my lead glove, with BD Guide glove for belaying, rappelling. But - as others mention - I have a quiver of gloves and have 3-4 pair with me for ice cragging. What I plan to add is a super warm mitten, like the OR. And lots of Snowseal on the leather work gloves  

Ice4life · · US · Joined Nov 2010 · Points: 335

I've used the project gloves and thought they were ok for mixed, less than warm for long multi pitch.  I like my BD torque gloves for mixed.  I use M10 gloves for warmer days, terminators for colder days, and Poseidons or firebrand for belay gloves depending on temps.

Also on a side note, I've been using liner gloves more and more for shorter warmer climbs, and it works great, they dry out fast, I feel I don't get pumped as much since I have a better feel, down side is obviously warmth, so experiment with that and you might have luck too, instead of buying $300.00+ in gloves.

Chiatt Hiatt · · Bozeman, Mt · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 85
jon jugenheimer wrote:

I have been using the BD terminators for as long as I can remember. 

Huge +1 on the BD Terminators.  I live in Bozeman, and I'm on ice 40+ days a year.  I don't remember the last time I didn't bring/use the Terminators.  I have lighter gloves and loftier gloves, but these are the go to.  Oh, and I pay for my stuff...no special connections or pro deals. 

beccs · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 114
NorCalNomad wrote:

2 gloves mininum. 

For climbing, the thinnest you can get away with in the conditions the better. Thicker gloves = gripping harder = less blood flow

The golf glove approach for climbing used by a lot of people is very valid. 

Then at least have a belay glove. Extra liners are handy to do a 2.5 system

You are absolutely correct about thicker gloves = gripping harder. I suppose that would result in less blood flow, but more importantly it increases the pump significantly.

Golf gloves are excellent for dry tooling because of this, but when it comes to pure ice they will absorb too much water with little insulation value imo.

I have a pair of the Rab gloves and find them quite warm, but only tend to use them as belay gloves or when warming up on cold day. I like them a lot, but I will almost always climb ice in a simple pair of fleece liner gloves. Once you are warmed up (i.e. - have the barfies out of your system) you should be able to stay more than warm enough while swinging and climbing.

When dry tooling and wearing golf gloves I am extra diligent about staying warm between burns (and always have belay gloves/mitts on over the golf gloves). 

Jacon · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2013 · Points: 200

I seem to be in the minority here, but I think it's a lot easier to train yourself to be dexterous with thicker gloves than it is to train yourself to be warm in thin gloves (which is possible, but only to a point).  

I am also constantly surprised by the idea (widely-held, it seems) that barfies are inevitable and that you just have to get it over with and then you'll be good.  I got barfies when I was younger because I overgripped, or didn't recognize when my fingers were getting cold, but haven't gotten them in years.... 

FWIW, I almost never climb in anything thinner than Punishers, and occasionally in thicker gloves (Enforcers, Alpine Alibis).   I have no trouble placing screws, belaying, etc. etc.  I rarely change into belay gloves or mitts because Punishers are warm enough down to single digits.  This has been true for me for a decade or so, but things got even better when the current generation of tools downsized the grips, allowing for thicker gloves and same hand shape.  

jdonigan · · Brooklyn · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 25
Dave Bn · · Fort Collins, CO · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 10

Is the Kinco fad over?  We're almost to the end of page one and not a single person has recomended using the least dextrous gloves made because they cost $20 and their rad friend wears them and that guy in the ski video and the lifty who they kinda hate but maybe have a little crush on.

Jason4Too · · Bellingham, Washington · Joined Apr 2014 · Points: 0
Dave Bn wrote:

Is the Kinco fad over?  We're almost to the end of page one and not a single person has recomended using the least dextrous gloves made because they cost $20 and their rad friend wears them and that guy in the ski video and the lifty who they kinda hate but maybe have a little crush on.

Nope, you missed the recommendation for $20 gloves from Ace about half way up the page.  FWIW, I ride my sled in Kincos but I use fancy fragile leather gloves for all of my snowboarding and ski touring and tougher fancy leather gloves for mountaineering.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Post a Reply

Log In to Reply