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Removing Glue-in Bolts in a No Bolting Area


Original Post
David Vogel · · Lake Forest, CA · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 1,290

Hiya guys and gals, I need some tips in helping remove Glue-in Bolts. I met him for a few minutes, I kindly explained to him the local bolting ethic (No bolts, anywhere, ever, under no circumstances). Being a jerk to him wouldn't help... but it was a bummer seeing how easy if was for him scoff out loud when I brought up the topic of respecting and preserving nature. Like...whatever man...that's like...your opinion man...

I searched online on how to properly do it. There's probably some thread from years ago that would be perfect information, but after spending all some time online researching (most information would focus only on how to properly install) my search was rather fruitless. 

Sandstone rock. 3 Steel Glue-in bolts. Or "U-Shaped Steel hooks"... not sure. Anyway, what's the best practice here folks? 

I have a garage full of tools, when I'm done chopping I want to cover it so the color matches the surrounding rock and blends in with nature.

Most importantly, I don't want to do this the wrong way, I don't want to "wing it" and cause further damage. 

This isn't a bolted route, they are anchors for a slack line so his friends can have scenic pictures to post on Instagram. This guy even specifically told me that he already knew this was against the rules. I like rules, especially the ones that protect the outdoors.

Let's NOT give this guy some "Slack." Did I make you laugh? My puns are... awful... just awful.

Drederek · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2004 · Points: 315

Troll?

lloyd · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2011 · Points: 0

I think the supposed removal of glue-ins involves using a torch to heat up the bolt to soften the glue and remove. This has always been stated somewhat theoretically (when someone asks how glue-ins will ever be replaced) and I don't recall ever seeing anyone stating that they'd used this technique in actual practice. Probably worth a try before more brutal tactics are employed to remove the offending hardware.

Cave Man McElroy · · auburn · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 0

Honestly spray paint them yellow/orange, stop tripping, and let people have fun.

Tim Lutz · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2012 · Points: 5

I would normally argue against removal of anchor bolts

but for slacklining?!?!?!

yeah, screw that guy and his crew

amarius · · Nowhere, OK · Joined Feb 2012 · Points: 20

Zoloft or Xanax. Or, perhaps, devil's lettuce

David Vogel · · Lake Forest, CA · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 1,290

Thanks lloyd and Tim. Ya it's only for a slackline, which lines out to a very small island (maybe 10'x10' in size) in a small ocean channel which sees a lot of traffic, like swimmers... and huge boats.

The area has a rich history as one of the only local outdoor bouldering spots. These places need to be respectfully preserved. 

Old lady H · · Boise, Idaho · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 290
David Fogel wrote:

Hiya guys and gals, I need some tips in helping remove Glue-in Bolts. I met him for a few minutes, I kindly explained to him the local bolting ethic (No bolts, anywhere, ever, under no circumstances). Being a jerk to him wouldn't help... but it was a bummer how easy if was for him to lift up his chin and scoff out loud when I brought up the topic of respecting and preserving nature. 

I searched online on how to properly do it. There's probably some thread from years ago that would be perfect information, but after spending a some time online researching (most information would focus only on how to properly install) my search was rather fruitless. 

Sandstone rock. 3 Steel Glue-in bolts. Or "U-Shaped Steel hooks"... not sure. Anyway, what's the best practice here folks? 

I have a garage full of tools, when I'm done chopping I want to cover it so the color matches the surrounding rock and blends in with nature.

Most importantly, I don't want to do this the wrong way, I don't want to "wing it" and cause further damage. 

This isn't a bolted route, they are anchors for a slack line so his friends can have scenic pictures to post on Instagram. This guy even if specifically told me that he already knew this was against the rules. I like rules, especially rules protecting the outdoors.

Let's NOT give this guy some "Slack." Did I make you laugh? My puns are... awful... just awful.

If, big if, any authorities would prosecute this, maybe wait until the evidence is sprayed all over? ;-)

Best, OLH

John Barritt · · OKC · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 1,053

So you were there when he was putting them in? That would have been the time to remove them.................How long has it been since they were installed? Are they actually climbing glue ins or u-bolts? JB

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530

If they're staple bolts (two legs in the rock apart from each other), getting them out means a grinder. 

If they're fixe glue ins you might be able to twist them out with a steel rod and a small sledge. That would depend on alot of factors. If that didn't work, a grinder is probably the only way. 

If they're waves or Jim's bolts, again, the grinder would probably be the only option. 

If they're unobtrusive and not easily found by locals, id probably recommend leaving them alone. Chopping glue ins without damaging the rock can be really tricky business. If you end up having to grind them off, the best you could hope for is three flush stumps you can paint with a small brush to match the rock. The worst is huge grinding scars all around the area. 

Guy Keesee · · Moorpark, CA · Joined Mar 2008 · Points: 310

Just where is this at? 

Do the glue in's distract from the Bouldering?

More info is needed David.

 


jason.cre · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2014 · Points: 10

Clearly the bolts are not what distract from the area.  Its the influx of dirty slackliners and their trashy ethics that is causing damage.  These bolts must be removed at all costs.

Firestone · · California · Joined Nov 2015 · Points: 449

I vote to leave them just because even in the best case the rock is going to end up looking ugly from grinding/painting/gluing. Did they set up a high line anchor? Those take a lot of time and work to put together and bolts are really the only way to rig a slackline like that.

Pictures please

J. Albers · · Colorado · Joined Jul 2008 · Points: 1,793
jason.cre wrote:

Clearly the bolts are not what distract from the area.  Its the influx of dirty slackliners and their trashy ethics that is causing damage.  These bolts must be removed at all costs.

Yup, I think that is maybe the one thing that trad climbers, alpine climbers, sport climbers, and boulderers can all agree on....slacklining is for douchenozzles. Grind grind. Patch patch.

Benjamin Chapman · · Small Town, USA · Joined Jan 2007 · Points: 13,267

Propane torch, Sawzall, or large stout locks on the glue ins.

Guy Keesee · · Moorpark, CA · Joined Mar 2008 · Points: 310

Do you think that maybe some ocean watchers, or Bird watchers or other users of the place see CLIMBERS as a disruptive influence? 

With all the chalk and trash and boom boxes????   

I find that if you paint with a broad brush you miss the mark.

So is this "At the Beach"??? Newport? 

Mike Brady · · Van Diesel, OR · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 681
Guy Keesee wrote:


So is this "At the Beach"??? Newport? 

That would be super lame

s.price · · PS,CO · Joined Dec 2010 · Points: 1,348

Have you discussed this with those who manage the area? If so what is their take on it? 

I sympathize with your desire to clean it up but you should really know what you are getting into before taking it on yourself. If you damage the rock that might lead to potential problems for you. Good luck.

Sketty · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 0

David, there are two potential situations here, and your post does not clarify which this is.

1) If the state / park authorities prohibit bolting and this is an access issue for the area, then this should be a relatively easy to resolve - these people are jeopardizing future access for their own sport and many others. Slacklining is no more important than climbing, hiking, or any number of outdoor pursuits and no one should selfishly jeopardize access for the rest of us. Even if it's blatantly illegal, it should still probably be resolved without using the authorities because I wouldn't expect the authorities to know/care about the difference between slackliners and climbers. We both use the rock for recreation and if one of our groups hurts the rock I would expect them to clamp down on both of us.


2) Applying that same logic, if this is NOT a legal issue (and just a 'local ethic' issue), then the bolts should be camouflaged and left alone. Under what grounds does the local climbing ethic supercede the local slackline ethic? Many people are going to scoff at that statement, but please think about it for a second. If it's a case of "we were here first", then get ready to have the hikers dictate what we can and cannot do as climbers. Alternatively if it's a case of "preserving nature", then the first climber who forgets to brush their tick marks off has left a more visible impact on the rock than camouflaged bolts do to most outside observers. I'm a little salty on this topic, personally - the best local crag in my area has extremely limited access because the park is worried that hikers will be disturbed by the sight of climbers and that climbers will "detract from nature". Just recognize that if we're going to start proselytizing to other sports based on our own arbitrary and non-universal ethics, then we give instant credibility to any other group who would deploy that same argument against us.


And seriously, if you're main argument is "respecting and preserving nature", then we should all stay the hell out of the outdoors. How many grizzlies are left in California? Just the one on their flag? Any logical conclusion to that argument does not help us as climbers. We should absolutely strive to keep our impact minimal within our own community, but saying that slackliners can't have anchors because "we were here first // it ruins nature" is no different than hikers saying that they don't want climbers in their photos because they were there first and don't want anyone disturbing the rock.

I don't know the area in question and am certainly not an ethics expert, but I just wanted to point out that some of these arguments are extremely toxic to our community at large. Again, if it's a legal/access issue I'm very grateful that you said something and wish you the best of luck.

ViperScale . · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2013 · Points: 235

You could take a crap on them, that way to use them they have to get dirty and maybe will just leave the area.

Bryce Adamson · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 608
ViperScale wrote:

You could take a crap on them, that way to use them they have to get dirty and maybe will just leave the area.

That's one way to cut the gordian knot! Though, I'm not sure it meets the op's goal of respecting nature.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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