Baselayer go-to's?


Original Post
Hayden Smith · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2017 · Points: 0

I've been looking through extremely priced baselayer bottoms for days, can't seem to find anything that looks like a deal. 

What brands do you normally use for summer alpine/mountaineering? 

Austin Durr · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2014 · Points: 0

I'm a big fan of Patagonia Capeline #2 and #3. I got my first one 14 years ago and still wear it on certain types of climbing days despite (maybe because of) the "ventilation holes" in the elbows.

that guy named seb · · Britland · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 0

Is there really a need for long johns in the summer? unless you are using something like a trouser that is something like the fortius 1.0 fabric from arc'teryx or you're ice climbing i really don't think you need them, but since you asked, I would probably go for Arc'teryx's AR baselayer (SL is just far to fragile for use as long underwear) if i had the money to burn, from what I've heard and seen of Patagonia's it's a bit on the loose side.

Hayden Smith · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2017 · Points: 0

Anything weather can happen in the Alps. I'd like to have them just in case a day flows cooler than normal.

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,500

Icebreakers, I can't stand synthetics. 

Hayden Smith · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2017 · Points: 0

Everything Icebreaker is $$$ though, what do they use, merino? I figured most thermals were synthetics.

rgold · · Poughkeepsie, NY · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 40
that guy named seb wrote:

Is there really a need for long johns in the summer? 

Folks vary a lot in cold tolerance.  Alpine starts at elevation in, say,  the Tetons can easily have temps in the mid-forties; if you are on the West side of the peak it is likely to stay chilly for a good part of the day, the rock will be cold when you sit on it,  and if it is windy the situation can be quite bracing.  Personally, I've found powerstretch tights under softshell pants to be very comfortable in low fifties temps with high winds, but I've backed off a touch and use Patagonia lightweight capilene now.  I agree that it is cut a little on the loose side (or maybe my legs are just too damn skinny).  I also don't find them to be terribly uncomfortable when the temps rise; I'm far more sensitive to excessive insulation on my torso.

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,500
Hayden Smith wrote:

Everything Icebreaker is $$$ though, what do they use, merino? I figured most thermals were synthetics.

Yes, merino. And yes, they're expensive, but not much more than Patagucci's stuff. And they don't stink to high heaven after half a day. Imho, this is nice, especially on long trips. 

Squeak · · Perth West OZ · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 18
Hayden Smith wrote:

I've been looking through extremely priced baselayer bottoms for days, can't seem to find anything that looks like a deal. 

What brands do you normally use for summer alpine/mountaineering? 

Smartwool 100% pure wool has kept me warm in the Andes :)

Lena chita · · Cleveland, OH · Joined Mar 2011 · Points: 210
Squeak wrote:

Smartwool 100% pure wool has kept me warm in the Andes :)

+1 for smartwool. Not that Icebreaker or Patagonia isn't good. But I happen to have a pair of Smartwool NTS long johns (250 weight). I've had them for about 8 years now, and they held up amazingly well. The wool is soft and not itchy at all, and they have been washed on hot (by accident) a few times, and have been dried hot, with cotton shirts ( again, by accident) a few times, with no noticeable shrinking and very minimal piling. Worth the price for sure! And if you can afford to wait, stuff does go on sale occasionally...

Scott McMahon · · Boulder, CO · Joined Feb 2006 · Points: 105

Just got a couple of these smartwool tops.  Should have gotten them years ago.  No stink, wicking dries while you wear them. Perfect. https://www.rei.com/rei-garage/product/117832/smartwool-nts-micro-150-pattern-tee-mens

Noah Yetter · · Lakewood, CO · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 10

Smartwool. 150 if it's gonna be chilly and/or you'll be active, 250 if seriously cold and/or standing around.

Jon Frisby · · Brooklyn, NY · Joined Feb 2013 · Points: 25
Hayden Smith wrote:

Everything Icebreaker is $$$ though, what do they use, merino? I figured most thermals were synthetics.

1/2 price-ish if you're an AAC member via the prodeal site

Ryan Hamilton · · Orem · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 0

I've used 3-4 different brands of base layers and found them all to work well and be comfortable. The one factor you have to have is Merino wool. They are comfy, warm and resist stinking. Synthetic will start stinking bad, especially on a big mountain after several days of wearing. I also don't think they breathe or work as well. 

Hayden Smith · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2017 · Points: 0

Thanks for the knowledge guys, I'll keep my eyes open for deals on some 150 weight tops and bottoms.

Hayden Smith · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2017 · Points: 0

I've also been looking at the smartwool heavy mountaineering socks. These run on average $23 a pair. 

I won't be doing any treks over 6 miles and most distance is on glacier travel. 

For climbing i'll be doing class IV scrambling so the extra padding would be nice. People swear by these socks though but i'm not sure they will be necessary. My boots are also slightly insulated down to -7 degrees C so I'm trying to find a good balance on temperature.

Any recommendations would be nice.

Robin S · · OR · Joined Jun 2016 · Points: 10

Anything merino for a baselayer. Huge fan of my Icebreaker. As for socks, I'm a huge fan of Darn Tough. You pay for them ($25 bucks a pair) but they will replace them, no questions asked, if they sustain any sort of damage. 

ottothecow · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 0

Uniqlo heat tech.  They are kind of like the Japanese Gap, but this stuff is legit.

I like the regular-weight stuff (I run warm) but they also make an extra-warm version.  The inventory seems pretty slim right now, but I expect it will fill out in the fall when they start selling winter clothes (full range of long/short sleeve and v/crew/turtle-necks).

I prefer it to my capilene stuff...and I pay about $5 per piece on average during frequent sales.  They have beige v-necks for $3.90 right now (regular $15)...I originally bought some v-necks for wearing with dress shirts in the city, but I honestly can't really tell the difference when I wear them outside...it isn't until I go with something more turtle-neck like that I can feel a difference.

Their cheap stuffable down jackets are great too...

Kat M · · San Diego, CA · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 0

I have several pairs of smartwool socks, light, medium, and heavyweight for the different seasons.  They are great and extremely durable, the medium weight pairs I use for backpacking outlasted my hiking boots and have stood up to hundreds of miles of abuse.  I don't think you will regret spending $23 on a pair of socks that will last you several seasons of hiking and mountaineering. 

Ted.kemble · · tower city · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 0

i use the HH {helly hanson}  for skiing not sure where thats at price wise among others but its what i use and it keeps me warm down to single digits i use there "warm" pants but they offer other types for warmer temps.

Ryan Hamilton · · Orem · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 0
Kat M wrote:

I have several pairs of smartwool socks, light, medium, and heavyweight for the different seasons.  They are great and extremely durable, the medium weight pairs I use for backpacking outlasted my hiking boots and have stood up to hundreds of miles of abuse.  I don't think you will regret spending $23 on a pair of socks that will last you several seasons of hiking and mountaineering. 

+1 for this Smartwool Socks. I bought some on sale 6 years ago and they are going strong. I think I have 2 each of each: heavy, medium, light. 

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Post a Reply

Log In to Reply