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Mammut magic slings???


Khoi · · Vancouver, BC · Joined Oct 2009 · Points: 45
Christian George wrote:

Who took a return of climbing gear?

I want to know so that I never ever buy anything from them. 

Why?

And why are you assuming that returned climbing soft goods are getting resold???

Mountain Equipment Co-op in Canada takes returns on EVERYTHING they sell. A lot of the stuff that they take back does not get resold, like food, climbing soft goods, underwear, swim wear, etc.

Chase Giltner · · Seattle, WA · Joined Jun 2017 · Points: 0
Ryan M Moore wrote:

But I never see it at their garage sale so the probably just return to manufactureer

Yeah, likely they destroy the item, return to the manufacturer, or a cheeky employee snags it. 

coldfinger · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 55

Lots off way off topic chat so far, so.......

The 120cm is the length to buy this as it has a huge advantage over any other material (6mm, nylon, dyneema): it is way way easier to untie your master point overhand knot.  When dealing with multipitch two point anchors (bolts or screws) it's pretty ideal. 

Unlike dyneema it doesn't lose strength when knotted and is way more durable  

Nick Drake · · Newcastle, WA · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 483
coldfinger wrote:

Lots off way off topic chat so far, so.......

The 120cm is the length to buy this as it has a huge advantage over any other material (6mm, nylon, dyneema): it is way way easier to untie your master point overhand knot.  When dealing with multipitch two point anchors (bolts or screws) it's pretty ideal. 

Unlike dyneema it doesn't lose strength when knotted and is way more durable  

Did it become a bit more pliable with use?

coldfinger · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 55

A bit, but not much and that is not a bad thing if you are not tying any other knot than an overhand. As long as your master point biner captures the strands the knot is 100% good. I did notice that as the aramid sheath begins to wear and lose its coating that knots were a bit harder to untie. 

Dan Africk · · Brooklyn, New York · Joined May 2014 · Points: 285
coldfinger wrote:

A bit, but not much and that is not a bad thing if you are not tying any other knot than an overhand. As long as your master point biner captures the strands the knot is 100% good. I did notice that as the aramid sheath begins to wear and lose its coating that knots were a bit harder to untie. 

Are you sure the sheath is Aramid? Mammut doesn't say on their website what it's made out of, the REI site says it's Nylon (in the Q&A section), but I wouldn't be shocked of that's incorrect.

David Kerkeslager · · Brooklyn, NY · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 55

One of my climbing partners has some magic slings. They're very stiff.

The real benefit I see to the magic slings is that they're more sun/weather/abrasion resistant. I'm not sure that outweighs the negatives though.

Jeremy Frey · · Portland, OR · Joined Aug 2017 · Points: 0
John Wilder wrote:

If you want a sling that you can cut and keep a 22kn rating when knotted that isnt so stiff (and expensive), pick up some Edelrid Tech Web. Cheaper than dyneema, thinner than nylon. Made of both.

+1. Great stuff, cheap enough to replace frequently. 

LB Edwards · · Brooklyn, NY · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 28

I have been using the 120cm magic slings and I like it. The stiffness gets softer over time and the retaining strength gives me piece of mind for my extended rappel and PAS as well as an anchor on chains.

Michael Diep · · vienna, va · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 0
LB Edwards wrote:

I have been using the 120cm magic slings and I like it. The stiffness gets softer over time and the retaining strength gives me piece of mind for my extended rappel and PAS as well as an anchor on chains.

do you still put it around your shoulder or does it get soft enough to manage on the harness?

LB Edwards · · Brooklyn, NY · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 28
Michael Diep wrote:

do you still put it around your shoulder or does it get soft enough to manage on the harness?

I'll sling it around the bottom of my stack around the shoulder to use for the anchor (I keep single biner & slings for cam extensions on top of that). All personal preference. I keep the one I use for a pass hitched on the hard points and down through my legs into the back rack.

Dan Africk · · Brooklyn, New York · Joined May 2014 · Points: 285
John Wilder wrote:

If you want a sling that you can cut and keep a 22kn rating when knotted that isnt so stiff (and expensive), pick up some Edelrid Tech Web. Cheaper than dyneema, thinner than nylon. Made of both.

FYI, I think most if not all dyneema slings are actually a blend of nylon and dyneema. I believe the colored part is nylon, the white part is dyneema. I first read this about Bluewater Titan slings, but I think it's true about most or all dyneema slings, whether the manufacturer advertises this fact or not.

Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,745
Dan Africk wrote:

FYI, I think most if not all dyneema slings are actually a blend of nylon and dyneema. I believe the colored part is nylon, the white part is dyneema. I first read this about Bluewater Titan slings, but I think it's true about most or all dyneema slings, whether the manufacturer advertises this fact or not.

This is correct. Also, Dyneema and Spectra are the same type of fiber just from different suppliers.

Greg Shea · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 10

120 magic sling is nice for extending rappels and cleaning anchors and such, it gets a little softer and is the easiest sling to work with when wearing gloves

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530
Dan Africk wrote:

FYI, I think most if not all dyneema slings are actually a blend of nylon and dyneema. I believe the colored part is nylon, the white part is dyneema. I first read this about Bluewater Titan slings, but I think it's true about most or all dyneema slings, whether the manufacturer advertises this fact or not.

Yes, this is true. Mammut has the lowest nylon to dyneema ratio with their 8mm slings- and yes, the colored part is nylon and white is dyneema because dyneema cannot hold a dye. Mammut used to make a 6mm dyneema sling with barely any nylon, but they weren't durable enough and they discontinued them after a couple years. These days, the 8mm Mammut and 10mm BD seem to be the most common.

That said, you cant tie a regular dyneema sling (with white showing) into a knot as the dyneema will slip and the know will fail. It is a known limitation of dyneema slings.

the Edelrid Tech Web have a nylon sheath and a dyneema core, allowing the sling to be cut and tied into a knot. The nylon is what allows the knot to be tied while the inner core keeps the strength rating at 22kn. They're a little fatter than dyneema, but skinnier than any regular nylon sling- and cheaper than a dyneema sling as well, which makes for a pretty great compromise, imho.

edit: The Mammut Magic Sling is likely to have a nylon sheath and aramid core, similar to the Tech Web. Mammut's tech is essentially the same thing as the Tech Web, except its stiffer, more expensive, and bulkier than the Edelrid version. 

Dan Africk · · Brooklyn, New York · Joined May 2014 · Points: 285
John Wilder wrote:

edit: The Mammut Magic Sling is likely to have a nylon sheath and aramid core, similar to the Tech Web. Mammut's tech is essentially the same thing as the Tech Web, except its stiffer, more expensive, and bulkier than the Edelrid version. 

Thanks for clarifying about the Edelrid tech web. Mammut says that the magic sling has a dyneema core, so that's one thing we know for sure. I think you're also right about the nylon sheath, but I haven't seen that confirmed aside from the REI page.

I personally won't buy or trust anything from Edelrid since I had one of their 'slider' locking carabiners fail, and they refused to issue a recall or warning even after admitting it was a known issue.. but that's a rant for another day..

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530
Dan Africk wrote:

Thanks for clarifying about the Edelrid tech web. Mammut says that the magic sling has a dyneema core, so that's one thing we know for sure. I think you're also right about the nylon sheath, but I haven't seen that confirmed aside from the REI page.

I personally won't buy or trust anything from Edelrid since I had one of their 'slider' locking carabiners fail, and they refused to issue a recall or warning even after admitting it was a known issue.. but that's a rant for another day..

Fail? I've used their slider lockers and have been using them since they were released (I used to work for them)- the original versions tended to stick open, but the new ones have fixed the issue and the old ones were easily closed with a light tap.  I've never heard of one actually failing in use if the gate was closed (and I can't imagine how it would- its a regular carabiner). 

For your own reference- Edelrid invented the kernmantle rope, so their soft good tech is the among best out there. Their hard goods are all made by Climbing Technologies in Italy, including the slider. 

BigB · · Red Rock, NV · Joined Feb 2015 · Points: 340
LB Edwards wrote:

...All personal preference. I keep the one I use for a pass hitched on the hard points and down through my legs into the back rack.

PAS thong

Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,745
BigB wrote:

PAS thong

Also known as a "newbie thong".

Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,745
John Wilder wrote:

That said, you cant tie a regular dyneema sling (with white showing) into a knot as the dyneema will slip and the know will fail. It is a known limitation of dyneema slings.

John, I know you know this, but your statement - as written - is what leads newbies to believe they can't tie a masterpoint in a Dyneema blend sling, or knot it in use at any time.

So, newbies realding this thread, better to say: Dyneema slings can't be cut e.g. to use as a rap sling, AND TIED BACK INTO A LOOP, as the knot will not hold.

Knotting ANY sling to shorten it is fine in normal climbing situations.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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