Mammut magic slings???


Original Post
Will Shelton · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2017 · Points: 0

I'm new to outdoor sport climbing, and have been wondering about the efficacy of the new mammut dyneema magic slings for cleaning the top of single pitch tr routes. I know the dyneema isn't really dynamic at all, and so it would be bad to fall on from any height. Anything y'all might know about these slings would be much appreciated. 


Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 490
Will Shelton wrote:

I'm new to outdoor sport climbing, and have been wondering about the efficacy of the new mammut dyneema magic slings for cleaning the top of single pitch tr routes. I know the dyneema isn't really dynamic at all, and so it would be bad to fall on from any height. Anything y'all might know about these slings would be much appreciated. 


Since any old sling will do and the Mammut is four times the price of something normal can´t see any reason to bother personally.

Jeremy Justus · · Steamboat Springs, CO · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 0

I haven't seen those before, but the fact that it only loses 20% of it's strength when knotted vs the usual 40% makes me want to get the longer one for slinging trees or other natural pro for anchors. I agree with Jim that it's a little bit much for what your looking for. Check out the Purcell prusik, it'll be cheaper and it's adjustable so you can keep it tight

ChrisHau · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2014 · Points: 305

Use draws. You don't need slings.

Jeremy Justus wrote:

I haven't seen those before, but the fact that it only loses 20% of it's strength when knotted vs the usual 40% makes me want to get the longer one for slinging trees or other natural pro for anchors. I agree with Jim that it's a little bit much for what your looking for. Check out the Purcell prusik, it'll be cheaper and it's adjustable so you can keep it tight

Really? For a 22 kN sling, that means upping from 13 kN to around 17 kN. Whoopdedoo. If you're generating 13 kN (more than the UIAA drop test) in any situation, I'd be more worried about your internal organs. Overpriced and completely unnecessary.

eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 456
ChrisHau wrote:

Use draws. You don't need slings.

Really? For a 22 kN sling, that means upping from 13 kN to around 17 kN. Whoopdedoo. If you're generating 13 kN (more than the UIAA drop test) in any situation, I'd be more worried about your internal organs. Overpriced and completely unnecessary.

Actually the UIAA test measures the impact force on the climber. The top piece sees a higher force, roughly 1.6x what the climber sees. If we're going with 13kn for our impact force that means the sling needs to hold 20.8 kN in the worst case scenario. When you consider that slings get worn and sun bleached, and lose strength and that ropes lose their elasticity over time, your margins of safety are slim to none in the worst case scenario. For low factor falls, your margins are better, and for TRing the forces are so low it doesn't really matter.

Just remember to replace your slings before they get all ratty, and retire ropes that feel really stiff to TRing

ChrisHau · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2014 · Points: 305
eli poss wrote:

Actually the UIAA test measures the impact force on the climber. The top piece sees a higher force, roughly 1.6x what the climber sees. If we're going with 13kn for our impact force that means the sling needs to hold 20.8 kN in the worst case scenario. When you consider that slings get worn and sun bleached, and lose strength and that ropes lose their elasticity over time, your margins of safety are slim to none in the worst case scenario. For low factor falls, your margins are better, and for TRing the forces are so low it doesn't really matter.

Just remember to replace your slings before they get all ratty, and retire ropes that feel really stiff to TRing

The 13 kN number takes into account the 1.6 multiplication on the top piece. On a UIAA fall, factor 1.71, with a 176 pound weight, the force the climber feels is 8.3 kN, which comes out to around 13 on the top piece. So I concede that if you take a horrible factor 1.7 fall, and your top piece involves a sling and is at least a 0.75 or bigger (because anything smaller will break at 12 kN anyway) then yes, the Mammut magic sling might be worth it over another sling.

Point is, margins of safety are plenty good enough with normal slings. And OP and others debating the pros and cons of sling types shouldn't worry about stuff like that and instead focus on basics such as how to clean an anchor with a pair of quickdraws.

Will Shelton · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2017 · Points: 0

Chris, 

I know how to clean with both a pas/slings to lower, and how to clean with a pair of lockers and a single overhanded sling to rap. 

Any link to how to. Lean with 2 draws? Or is it just the same you'd do with slings? 

Thanks all for your input.

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 190
ChrisHau · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2014 · Points: 305

I prefer this method - https://www.climbing.com/skills/cleaning-sport-anchors/. Only requires an additional locker at most (or, just use another draw).

Jeremy Justus · · Steamboat Springs, CO · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 0

I suppose it is overkill but even if it's 4 times more expensive it's still only around 20 so not much for something your hanging your life on, and may be worth the little extra peace of mind one might get from that.

And you guys posted right after one another so chris you might not have seen Ted's post but it seems like yours has an unnecessary extra step of retying the original knot? Ive never used either method as i prefer and enjoy rappelling so maybe there is an advantage im not seeing?  

Firestone · · California · Joined Nov 2015 · Points: 509

Using a sling that is dedicated just for cleaning sport anchors is extra stuff you don't need. If you cleaned the pitch then you have draws, its personal preference to carry a cleaning sling at that point. You can clean the anchor without untying like Ted and Chris posted.

The mammut magic slings look awesome for someone who wants a very abrasion resistant sling. The breaking strength is probably not the biggest bonus of the new sling design, but when you tie a knot in the mammut magic slings the knot comes out easily after being loaded. If you climb a lot of rock where placements are near sharp edges or flakes it is probably safer to use the mammut magic slings and maybe even a pair of half ropes or twins to double up. 

eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 456

Does anybody know what the sheath in the magic sling is made from? The website just says abrasion resistant sheath which is probably just marketing BS. I doubt it's aramid so unless it's just dyneema, it's either nylon or polyester. My guess would be polyester 

bridge · · Brooklyn, NY · Joined May 2016 · Points: 10

They're stiff, thick, and difficult to work with.  Not impressed.  Bought one and returned it.

JFM · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2010 · Points: 1,828
bridge wrote:

They're stiff, thick, and difficult to work with.  Not impressed.  Bought one and returned it.

Yeah I used one today -- stiff and heavy. It was OK for a non-knotted sliding X TR anchor but otherwise I'd leave it on the shelf at REI...

ChrisHau · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2014 · Points: 305
Jeremy Justus wrote:

I suppose it is overkill but even if it's 4 times more expensive it's still only around 20 so not much for something your hanging your life on, and may be worth the little extra peace of mind one might get from that.

And you guys posted right after one another so chris you might not have seen Ted's post but it seems like yours has an unnecessary extra step of retying the original knot? Ive never used either method as i prefer and enjoy rappelling so maybe there is an advantage im not seeing?  

Depends on the area, but usually I can't fit a bight through the anchors. So the retie is necessary.

Rappelling quickly becomes impractical as the lines get steeper, especially if the local ethic is just to lower.

Michael Diep · · vienna, va · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 0
JFM wrote:

Yeah I used one today -- stiff and heavy. It was OK for a non-knotted sliding X TR anchor but otherwise I'd leave it on the shelf at REI...

I bought a 120cm one... I agree it's stiff. dunno what I'm going to do with it. Will just sit in my bin for now. 

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530

If you want a sling that you can cut and keep a 22kn rating when knotted that isnt so stiff (and expensive), pick up some Edelrid Tech Web. Cheaper than dyneema, thinner than nylon. Made of both.

Emmett Lyman · · Somerville, MA · Joined Feb 2011 · Points: 355

I checked one out at the gear shop a couple weeks ago. Didn't handle particularly well, and too stiff to make practical draws out of. Better approach is cheaper dyneema for your alpine draws and then a couple of shouldered nylon runners if you think you'll be slinging horns/trees, running over sharp edges, etc. Eventually I'm sure they'll get the Magic's usability up and the price down, but not worth it for now.

Christian George · · Ridgway CO · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 0
bridge wrote:

They're stiff, thick, and difficult to work with.  Not impressed.  Bought one and returned it.

Who took a return of climbing gear?

I want to know so that I never ever buy anything from them. 

Chase Giltner · · Seattle, WA · Joined Jun 2017 · Points: 0
Christian George wrote:

Who took a return of climbing gear?

I want to know so that I never ever buy anything from them. 

REI does.

Ryan M Moore · · Philadelphia, PA · Joined Oct 2014 · Points: 35

But I never see it at their garage sale so the probably just return to manufactureer

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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