Climbing Technology Be Up feedback?


Original Post
ebmudder · · Bronx, NY · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 50
Andrew Krajnik · · Plainfield, IL · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 250

I don't see any fundamental difference between this and a Guide ATC...?

Fritz N. · · Durango, CO · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 110

can't tell from the website: does it offer assisted braking for lead belay? 

Andrew Krajnik · · Plainfield, IL · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 250
Fritz N. wrote:

can't tell from the website: does it offer assisted braking for lead belay? 

It doesn't appear to. The thing looks "hinged", but from what I can tell, it's a single piece of aluminum. From the video, it looks like it operates the same as an ATC Guide.

anotherclimber · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 70
Andrew Krajnik wrote:

I don't see any fundamental difference between this and a Guide ATC...?

The only real difference I can make out is that the nose hole for releasing the second in guide mode is big enough to accept an HMS carabiner. Otherwise the shape is unique in an attempt to cut weight off of it. And no it is not hinged but easy to think so from the look of it. This device may be filling a price point in the Italian market where it is made. I don't how the taxing system works in Italy and the EU, but perhaps with Italian import taxes and/or VAT this comes out to be less expensive than a Black Diamond ATC Guide? 

ebmudder,

If you are looking to buy one of these type of belay devices, I'd recommend the DMM Pivot. It is the same price as the Black Diamond ATC Guide here in the USA, but way easier to lower a second in guide mode. Edit: I'd also note that I can't find anywhere online in the USA to buy a Be Up, and for probably very good reason. 

anotherclimber · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 70
Fritz N. wrote:

can't tell from the website: does it offer assisted braking for lead belay? 

No. It is essentially the same function as a Black Diamond ATC Guide.

ebmudder · · Bronx, NY · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 50
Andrew Krajnik wrote:

I don't see any fundamental difference between this and a Guide ATC...?

Yes, I think it's functionally similar. I like the clean design of it, and --weight-weenies rejoice--It weighs 4 grams less than the ATC Guide! 

I'm curious about it's real-world performance in guide mode...seems like you could inadvertently clip the rope to the wrong carabiner when rigging it...the ATC Guide's separate guide-mode hole seems a bit more idiot proof.

anotherclimber · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 70
ebmudder wrote:

Yes, I think it's functionally similar. I like the clean design of it, and --weight-weenies rejoice--It weighs 4 grams less than the ATC Guide! 

I'm curious about it's real-world performance in guide mode...seems like you could inadvertently clip the rope to the wrong carabiner when rigging it...the ATC Guide's separate guide-mode hole seems a bit more idiot proof.

That's a very good point about accidentally clipping the rope into the wrong carabiner in guide mode. Scary!

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 490

The price point for the BeUp is about the same as the XP Guide.

The reason for the construction (it´s forged flat and then bent over and riveted) is partly to put the guide-mode suspension point further in toward the ropes but mainly to improve the handling and braking force. Tube type belay devices work better the deeper they are and there are limitations on how deep you can hot forge with conventional designs with thin wall sections, their solution allows the plate to be deeper.

Nick Drake · · Newcastle, WA · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 478
Jim Titt wrote:

The price point for the BeUp is about the same as the XP Guide.

The reason for the construction (it´s forged flat and then bent over and riveted) is partly to put the guide-mode suspension point further in toward the ropes but mainly to improve the handling and braking force. Tube type belay devices work better the deeper they are and there are limitations on how deep you can hot forge with conventional designs with thin wall sections, their solution allows the plate to be deeper.

So this leads to the question that you're asked every day on here, did ya test one yet? Want to get that drop tower back in action? :)

ebmudder · · Bronx, NY · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 50
anotherclimber wrote:

That's a very good point about accidentally clipping the rope into the wrong carabiner in guide mode. Scary!

I suppose if you always clip the device to the anchor before threading the rope it might be safe, but I've done strange things when I'm tired, in a hurry, or it's dark.

With the ATC Guide, I typically have it clipped to my harness by the wire...I sometimes remove it from the harness and clip it to the anchor, pull up rope, and forget to re-clip it in guide mode until I'm about to belay up the second. I can myself see screwing this up in typical noob fashion :(

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 490
Nick Drake wrote:

So this leads to the question that you're asked every day on here, did ya test one yet? Want to get that drop tower back in action? :)

Nope! It probably works real good though, I discussed it with the guys at CT when it came out but never got round to testing one for real. They were more interested in me testing the ClickUp/Alpine Up at that time.

Andrew Krajnik · · Plainfield, IL · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 250
Jim Titt wrote:

The price point for the BeUp is about the same as the XP Guide.

The reason for the construction (it´s forged flat and then bent over and riveted) is partly to put the guide-mode suspension point further in toward the ropes but mainly to improve the handling and braking force. Tube type belay devices work better the deeper they are and there are limitations on how deep you can hot forge with conventional designs with thin wall sections, their solution allows the plate to be deeper.

That's an interesting point. Would this also improve the ability to release in guide mode? It looks like it'd move the pivot point of the device in guide mode closer to the rope (similar to a DMM Pivot).

NorCalNomad · · San Francisco · Joined Oct 2011 · Points: 105
Jim Titt wrote:The reason for the construction (it´s forged flat and then bent over and riveted) 

That seems like a weird order of operations on aluminum (at least from what I understand about forging and alum's material properties). Maybe they are trying to save on mold cost and have some sort of bending tool on hand that makes it worth while (ie worth $)?

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 490
Andrew Krajnik wrote:

That's an interesting point. Would this also improve the ability to release in guide mode? It looks like it'd move the pivot point of the device in guide mode closer to the rope (similar to a DMM Pivot).

That´s the idea.

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 490
NorCalNomad wrote:

That seems like a weird order of operations on aluminum (at least from what I understand about forging and alum's material properties). Maybe they are trying to save on mold cost and have some sort of bending tool on hand that makes it worth while (ie worth $)?

Well flat´s not the right word, imagine it bent open again and then visualise it being forged. It really is a problem going as deep with those sort of hollow sections and getting metal flow into the corners, you´d normally have to try to forge it in a number of passes. Their solution is a neat idea really. 

Eric and Lucie · · Boulder, CO · Joined Oct 2004 · Points: 140

I've been interested in this design (and actively trying to locate one...) since it was announced (~2 years ago IIRC), primarily because it is designed for better friction in standard ATC mode when using very small diameter ropes (thin doubles ~ 7.5mm).  

I've tried most of the ATC-type devices available in the US and none of them really provide enough friction when rappelling on ropes <8mm (even with the dual 'biner trick).  The Petzl (Re)Verso is the best from that point of view IMO, but still really marginal.  Based on the pics I've seen and the specs, I suspect that the BeUp should work better with thin ropes.

Has anyone been able to find this for sale in North America?  I'd love to get my hands on one.

Nick Drake · · Newcastle, WA · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 478
Eric and Lucie wrote:

I've been interested in this design (and actively trying to locate one...) since it was announced (~2 years ago IIRC), primarily because it is designed for better friction in standard ATC mode when using very small diameter ropes (thin doubles ~ 7.5mm).  

I've tried most of the ATC-type devices available in the US and none of them really provide enough friction when rappelling on ropes <8mm (even with the dual 'biner trick).  The Petzl (Re)Verso is the best from that point of view IMO, but still really marginal.  Based on the pics I've seen and the specs, I suspect that the BeUp should work better with thin ropes.

Has anyone been able to find this for sale in North America?  I'd love to get my hands on one.

Have you tried double BD vapor biners? They have a more abrupt rope radius, add a lot more friction to the system than round stock like two attaches. On an 8mm mammut phoenix I had to push the brake strand through at the start of a rap. It was like a fat gym rope rap with a single biner using the high friction teeth orientation. 

Nate Doyle · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 10

@Andrew Krajnik, I was thinking about the DMM Pivot as well. 

@Eric and Lucie, maybe go with the Alpine Up if you can't locate the Be Up? Wait! Looks like the Be Up (as well as other CT Belay devices) is available over at Trekkinn.

NorCalNomad · · San Francisco · Joined Oct 2011 · Points: 105
Eric and Lucie wrote:

I've been interested in this design (and actively trying to locate one...) since it was announced (~2 years ago IIRC),

#italiantime

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 490

Launched at Outdoor in summer 2014.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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