Weekend trip to rrg, need help


Original Post
Austin Russell · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 10

Hey all, im in missouri and climb in arkansas pretty regularly. My family and i are looking to take a 3 day trip to climb and camp at rrg. Due to the whole family coming we would like sport routes from 5.6 up to 5.10. What would be the  area to go to and do the routes on mtn. Project suffice or is a guide book needed. And what is the suggested amount of  for the area of recommendation? Sorry for all the questions, but also if you have amy cheap camping recommendations that would also be appreciated. Thank you. 

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530

Muir for climbing. 

Miguel's for camping and food. 

A guide book would be helpful, as the Red is really spread out and a bit weird geographically, so maps are nice. You'll only need the Southern Region book, though, which covers Muir. 

BrianWS · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2010 · Points: 790

Miguel's is pretty gross, in my opinion. Overcrowded and maybe not the best option for a family.

Lago Linda is great, as are the Natural Bridge and other area campgrounds.

As the above poster said, get the southern guidebook. You can also check out redriverclimbing.com for an online guide, but get the book as well.

Austin Russell · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 10

Would the digital guide book work well? Claims it has over 1500 of the climbs

Sandbagger Vance · · Cincinnati, Ohio · Joined May 2016 · Points: 0

The easiest thing for your group would be to camp at Land of Arches Campground then drive 5 minutes to Muir Valley and pick up the Muir Valley pocketbook. You can buy it when you pay for parking. LOTA Campground is like 5 bucks a night/ tent. Muir valley is 10 for parking and another 10 for the pocketbook. The pocketbook is pretty helpful, but if you are looking for some really easy climbs just go the the land before time wall at Muir.

Stephen Lander · · Columbus, OH · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 10

I agree with bagger.

Muir for climbing, Land of the arches for camping. 

Don't bother buying a guidebook. Redriverclimbing.com has a great online one. Between that and MP, you'll be fine.

Brian L. · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 90

A guide book is nice to have for reference for not getting lost, etc. Or you'll be printing out a lot of info (and a lot of routes reference others for directions, and no crag maps). There's very little cell signal in the gorge, unless you're on top of a ridge.

That said: Muir sells a pocket guide to that area, so you can pick that up when you get there if that's the only place you plan to climb. Muir also tags their routes with name/grade, so you CAN just go and look around for stuff to climb. If you go on the weekend, to one of the popular spots, chances are it'll be crowded, but you'll be able to borrow a book from someone too.

StephMarie · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 5

So in response to your post, Muir for climbing & does anyone know if the Fin Castle campground right before the Muir Parking area is still open?? I suggest Fincastle because it is a less crowded/small campground option with what feels like your own personal shower house & pavilion at $4.00 a night, would be great for family & within close proximity (practically steps) to Muir Valley

Andrew Krajnik · · Plainfield, IL · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 277

I'll add to the Muir Valley love. It's a spectacular set of crags with easy access, well-marked trails, and stellar climbing. The climbs are marked at the base, so orienting yourself at the wall is super-easy. The Muir Valley Pocket guide is an affordable, compact, well-executed guide book that has exactly the information you need, and your purchase goes to support he maintenance of the property.

Graining Fork Nature Preserve (aka Roadside Crag) has a 5-minute approach, and some amazing climbs. When we did RRG last fall, we hit this crag the day we arrived, since we got to the area in the afternoon. If you climb here, make sure to get the permit online ahead of time. There have been access issues in the past (it was closed to the public for a number of years), so don't climb without a permit. Wireless data coverage is nonexistent in the parking area, so get the permit while you still have a signal.

If you want something a little more remote (and with fewer crowds), Miller Fork is one of the newest climbing areas in the Red. For the best crag beta, pick up Miller Fork Climbing (available at Miguel's). Approaches are longer, and the crags are more remote, so you won't run into as many other climbers.

Austin Russell · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 10

How many quickdraws do you all recommend for muir valley?

Andrew Krajnik · · Plainfield, IL · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 277
Austin Russell wrote:

How many quickdraws do you all recommend for muir valley?

10-12 should get you up most routes. If you pick up the pocket guide, the number of bolts is listed for each route. This won't help you now, of course, but it'll prevent you from getting into trouble when you're actually there. (i.e., you'll know if you don't have enough draws.)

Edit to add: I just spot checked a handful of moderates on MP, and they all have number of bolts listed under the "protection" section. Some are estimates, but it'll help you plan for number of draws before you get your hands on a pocket guide, should you choose to do so.

Austin Russell · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 10
Andrew Krajnik wrote:

10-12 should get you up most routes. If you pick up the pocket guide, the number of bolts is listed for each route. This won't help you now, of course, but it'll prevent you from getting into trouble when you're actually there. (i.e., you'll know if you don't have enough draws.)

Edit to add: I just spot checked a handful of moderates on MP, and they all have number of bolts listed under the "protection" section. Some are estimates, but it'll help you plan for number of draws before you get your hands on a pocket guide, should you choose to do so.

Is lowering or rappelling recommended at the rrg? Are the anchors ever fixed with permadraws and such?

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530
Austin Russell wrote:

Is lowering or rappelling recommended at the rrg? Are the anchors ever fixed with permadraws and such?

Generally the red is steep enough that if everyone is leading, you're lowering off. 

The only time I've ever witnessed a rappeller get hurt was at Muir. He was bent on rappelling off a route to save the gear, got to the first bolt, unclipped, and swung 30' right into a tree. His partner ate dirt trying to stop him. 

Andrew Krajnik · · Plainfield, IL · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 277
Austin Russell wrote:

Is lowering or rappelling recommended at the rrg? Are the anchors ever fixed with permadraws and such?

I've only been to a handful of the crags at the red, but the only permadraws I saw were on overhanging routes.

If you're going to set a top-rope, use your own gear. I think it's generally accepted for the last climber (the one who cleans the anchor) to lower off the anchor rings if they're not comfortable rapping.

Austin Russell · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 10

Ok thanks, im definitely more comfortable lowering 

Adam Blaylock · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2016 · Points: 0

Any suggested trip beta for a weekend trip that looks like Friday night and Saturday morning rain? Forecast subject to change, obviously, but thought I would ask the experts. Plan is to arrive late on Friday. 

Stephen Lander · · Columbus, OH · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 10

There are plenty of things that stay dry in the rain, but it depends on what you're trying to climb. What grades are you looking for? Are you climbing sport or trad?

Adam Blaylock · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2016 · Points: 0
Stephen Lander wrote:

There are plenty of things that stay dry in the rain, but it depends on what you're trying to climb. What grades are you looking for? Are you climbing sport or trad?

Our group is 100% sport. I've been a gym climber exclusively so far, so 5.easy to start. My group can sport lead 10s and maybe a few soft 11s, but is probably not doing any 12s outside. 

Stephen Lander · · Columbus, OH · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 10

Hmm. 11's are really where the rainy day options open up for sport climbing. I think Muir Valley is probably your best bet. I know there are some things that stay dry at bruisebrothers. The hideout and practice wall also have a few. I don't have a good list offhand, but you can use the advanced search feature on http://www.redriverclimbing.com/RRCGuide/ to specifically look for routes that will stay dry. 

Tylerpratt · · Litchfield, Connecticut · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 35
BrianWS wrote:

Miguel's is pretty gross, in my opinion. Overcrowded and maybe not the best option for a family.

Lago Linda is great, as are the Natural Bridge and other area campgrounds.

As the above poster said, get the southern guidebook. You can also check out redriverclimbing.com for an online guide, but get the book as well.

Agree Miguels has damn near quadrupled in size if not more in the past five years and the bathroom size has stayed the same. Not to mention broken stall doors and toilets that literally were leaking literal shit water on the floor when I was there 6 months ago. I was there for a few weeks and it was a problem before my stay, during my stay, and after my stay. 

Rick Lewis · · Indianapolis, IN · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 50

From your described group, history, and desire to have options Muir valley is where its at then for your group. Show some love to muir when you arrive grab the pocket guide and go have a great time. If its your first time in the gorge head to Miguels to camp, you will all have a great time and appreciate the barn when its raining.

The great wall, bruise brothers,  air ride equipped at the solarium, in a light rain land before time wall should be ok. go have fun !

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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