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WTB - Boots - La Sportiva - Single Layer - Size 46.5-47.5 ideally 47



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Original Post
Chase Hathaway · · albuquerque, nm · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 15

I am going to be spending 3 weeks in the cascades next month (mid jul to early aug). Several days on vertical ice. I have a pair of approach boulder GTX and a pair of double layer spantiks, both 47, and realized I need something between them (unfortunately).

I am looking for a pair of nepal evo with moderate use

or

a pair of similar full shank boots. makalu perhaps. Open to discussion (if someone wants to have it) on applicability of trango cube GTX which is a 3/4 shank if I remember correctly. 

Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 266

If you aren't super psyched about getting another pair of boots, you'll probably be fine with the Spantiks. I've seen a lot of guides use those or the newer G2s as their primary boot here. 

Food for thought. 

Porter McMichael · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2017 · Points: 10

Also curious about the trango cubes ability. I hear they are a half tpu shank to save weight. Guessing they would not cut it at all on vertical ice... but for lots of the climbs in Wa they should do the trick. Depends on the climbs youre planning on. Trangos would do the trick on any standard route up any of the volcanos here, but if youre looking to have much more fun than that a full shank would only help as I'm sure you know. Plus if you have full auto crampons for your spantiks the nepal or any rigid boot would still accept those crampons. Just my 2 cents, hope you find some boots!

Nick Sweeney · · Spokane, WA · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 653
Chris C. wrote:

If you aren't super psyched about getting another pair of boots, you'll probably be fine with the Spantiks. I've seen a lot of guides use those or the newer G2s as their primary boot here. 

Food for thought. 

I used G2SMs on the North Ridge of Baker two weeks ago, they were perfect! 

Chase Hathaway · · albuquerque, nm · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 15
Chris C. wrote:

If you aren't super psyched about getting another pair of boots, you'll probably be fine with the Spantiks. I've seen a lot of guides use those or the newer G2s as their primary boot here. 

Food for thought. 

Exactly my feeling... not super psyched. I'd be fine with carrying the extra weight of the spantiks in pack on approach in the approach boots/do approach in the spantiks. In your opinion would the spantiks be too hot for that time of year on mixed routes? Ive only been in the cascades early season/winter. I do occasionally have an issue with sweating causing damp skin/easy blister creation in them. Thats not to say that a single layer would be any better.

Chase Hathaway · · albuquerque, nm · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 15
Nick Sweeney wrote:

I used G2SMs on the North Ridge of Baker two weeks ago, they were perfect! 

nice. Thanks for the reference point :) do you continue to use them into late season?

Nick Sweeney · · Spokane, WA · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 653
Chase Hathaway wrote:

nice. Thanks for the reference point :) do you continue to use them into late season?

I recently picked up some La Sportiva Trango Cubes for climbs with glacier approaches or moderate glacier routes.  I think that G2s would be too much for the Cascades in late season - at lower elevations on Baker (approach and descent from high camp), I did notice that my feet were too warm - however, it did not create any problems for me.  Are you taking a course with a guide company or something? I'm trying to imagine where you'll be climbing vertical ice at that time - are you talking about alpine ice or legit waterfall ice?

Chase Hathaway · · albuquerque, nm · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 15
Porter McMichael wrote:

Also curious about the trango cubes ability. I hear they are a half tpu shank to save weight. Guessing they would not cut it at all on vertical ice... but for lots of the climbs in Wa they should do the trick. Depends on the climbs youre planning on. Trangos would do the trick on any standard route up any of the volcanos here, but if youre looking to have much more fun than that a full shank would only help as I'm sure you know. Plus if you have full auto crampons for your spantiks the nepal or any rigid boot would still accept those crampons. Just my 2 cents, hope you find some boots!

from what I understand, they are ok for short, single pitches of vertical ice but no more. ideally suited up to about 70*ish but even then from what I find on them, your calves are likely going to get sore on sustained routes. I like them as a one-upped approach boot (single quiver boot for the cascades if doing all low angle) but unless someone has experience with the just mentioned scenario and thinks they can handle sustained higher angle routes, im hesitant to spend the extra money 

Chase Hathaway · · albuquerque, nm · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 15
Nick Sweeney wrote:

I recently picked up some La Sportiva Trango Cubes for climbs with glacier approaches or moderate glacier routes.  I think that G2s would be too much for the Cascades in late season - at lower elevations on Baker (approach and descent from high camp), I did notice that my feet were too warm - however, it did not create any problems for me.  Are you taking a course with a guide company or something? I'm trying to imagine where you'll be climbing vertical ice at that time - are you talking about alpine ice or legit waterfall ice?

Yes, going with AAI on their AMTL2. So, alpine. I have several WaterIce routes I plan to do next year that I would like to use the same boots for though.

Nick Sweeney · · Spokane, WA · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 653

Nice.  I would not get the Trango Cubes if you plan to do any waterfall ice climbing - they are just not rigid enough.  They also probably are not warm enough, at least for me. You could make it up a short section of steep ice with them, but your calves will be exhausted quickly.  You are on the right track with the Nepal Evo boots.  This type of boot will serve you well this summer and will work great for waterfall ice.

Chase Hathaway · · albuquerque, nm · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 15

bump

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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