Scale of 1-10, how infected?


Original Post
Hobo Greg · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 25

1 being healthy skin, 10 being about to amputate. About ten days since injury.

CTdave · · Victor, Id. · Joined Apr 2013 · Points: 190

This is not WebMD.  If theres a climbing story to go with the photo, lets hear it.  Edit: ur gonna die

Downtownt Kay · · Everett, WA · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 55

you're good fam. throw some lavender/tea tree on it.

cut it off if it starts throwing red streaks up your leg...

Hobo Greg · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 25
CTdave wrote:

This is not WebMD.  If theres a climbing story to go with the photo, lets hear it.  Edit: ur gonna die

Was building out my van and accidentally kicked some metal without shoes on. Before you say "but thats not climbing related" remember, it was building out a van.

mediocre · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 0

I'd be more worried about the nail on the next toe over.

R. Moran · · Moab , UT · Joined Mar 2009 · Points: 0

Rub some kombu cha on it you hippy

shoo · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 0

When you ask for medical advice from a climber's forum, you will receive ineffective medical advice from amateurs. Seek actual medical attention if you are concerned, or at the very least seek information from a source frequented by licensed medical professionals.

As far as I was able to tell, there is no published scientific study* or other credible medical recommendations to suggest that aloe will do anything for your toe. Do it if it'll make you feel good, but don't consider it a treatment.

* There is basically one relevant study published that I could locate. It is tiny, completely uncontrolled, deeply methodologically flawed, poorly written to boot, and published in a pay-to-play journal whose reputation is poor enough that they aren't even indexed in standard medical databases any more.

Source: A doctorate (edit: the PhD kind, not the MD kind) and a decade+ of experience in medical evidence.

John Barritt · · OKC · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 888

Edit to add; I give it a 2. It appears to be healing nicely. 

If you want it to heal faster; Neosporin and bandages to keep it moist during the day, remove at night.

Never build a van (or anything else) barefoot or in sandals...................... ;)

Edit to add; Get a tetanus booster if you are building a van......... ;)

Andrew Krajnik · · Plainfield, IL · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 50
shoo wrote:

When you ask for medical advice from a climber's forum, you will receive ineffective medical advice from amateurs. Seek actual medical attention if you are concerned, or at the very least seek information from a source frequented by licensed medical professionals.

As far as I was able to tell, there is no published scientific study* or other credible medical recommendations to suggest that aloe will do anything for your toe. Do it if it'll make you feel good, but don't consider it a treatment.

* There is basically one relevant study published that I could locate. It is tiny, completely uncontrolled, deeply methodologically flawed, poorly written to boot, and published in a pay-to-play journal whose reputation is poor enough that they aren't even indexed in standard medical databases any more.

Source: A doctorate and a decade+ of experience in medical evidence.

+1

If you want to stave off bacteria, use something that's clinically proven to do so.

"Therapeutic-grade", "all-natural", and other such labels are meaningless terms, medically speaking. And if a product or its advertisement includes a disclaimer that it's "not intended to treat, cure, or prevent any disease", that's a good indicator that it probably won't treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Ask an actual doctor for advice, and then follow that advice.

sherb · · Loveland, Ohio & Wheat Ridg... · Joined Dec 2012 · Points: 0

5. Larger cut appears to still be pinkish/swollen around the injury and may include some pus. Everyone has their own rate of healing (I'm slow) but for 10 days that seems to still be pink. Is it warm to the touch? A round of anitibiotics should help. Yes you need a doctor for that.

I'm not a doctor but I would keep the area clean (wash daily, dirt on nails suggest otherwise), hydrogen peroxide is my favorite debrider, + iodine. Add rubbing alcohol/hand sanitizer around wound to kill proximate  germs. Cover with gauze for protection and breathability. Know I'm not against the little guy.

John Barritt · · OKC · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 888
sherb wrote:

5. Larger cut appears to still be pinkish/swollen around the injury and may include some pus. Everyone has their own rate of healing (I'm slow) but for 10 days that seems to still be pink. Is it warm to the touch? A round of anitibiotics should help. Yes you need a doctor for that.

I'm not a doctor but I would keep the area clean (wash daily, dirt on nails suggest otherwise), hydrogen peroxide is my favorite debrider, + iodine. Add rubbing alcohol/hand sanitizer around wound to kill proximate  germs. Cover with gauze for protection and breathability. Know I'm not against the little guy.

What happened to 1 thru 4? Also, not a doctor, but.......one told me......." hydrogen peroxide kills healthy tissue"....."use it to flush the wound when it happens, NOT after it starts healing".

Also, way to make him feel bad about his foot hygiene.................. ;)

sherb · · Loveland, Ohio & Wheat Ridg... · Joined Dec 2012 · Points: 0
John Barritt wrote:

What happened to 1 thru 4? Also, not a doctor, but.......one told me......." hydrogen peroxide kills healthy tissue"....."use it to flush the wound when it happens, NOT after it starts healing".

Also, way to make him feel bad about his foot hygiene.................. ;)

H2O2 for his future wounds that he refuses to see a doctor for then.

No one else provided Hobo Greg with a rating and so I did. Since I don't know for sure, I gave a "5" to be wishy-washy, cuz I don't know.  Garbage in, garbage out.

Cleanliness is medical care 101. He put his feet up for public viewing.

grog m aka Greg McKee · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2012 · Points: 0
  1. Skin is not that red. Area is not swollen. I do not see pus or other discharge.

But you should wash your feet. Pretty nasty.  CTdave-this is Web MP where MP scientists have solved some hard cases so pipe down. 

wing thing · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 55

Washing with simple soap and clean tap water will decrease bacterial contamination. Use a topical antibiotic ointment and cover with a sterile bandage and repeat daily. Don't use peroxide, iodine, or alcohol in the wound directly as they are toxic to normal tissue as well as to bacteria  (It's ok to apply to surface areas surrounding the wound but not really necessary). Your tetanus immunization needs to be current. You need to have your primary series complete and be current within the last 5 -10 years of receiving your last dose.  The things to look out for are increased redness, bleeding, drainage of pus, or increasing pain. If you have any doubt, go seek medical advice directly from your primary care provider. 

Dave Kos · · Temecula, CA · Joined Jan 2011 · Points: 50

If you can press on the red part without howling in pain, you may be ok.

Seriously though, don't second-guess an infected wound.  It can get really bad, really fast.

Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 91

doctor 

Stephen C · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 0

I'll give it a 1. I had an infection in my knee when I was about 14 years old. I had a 5 day hospital stay on IV antibiotics. That was about a 6 I'd say.

OrganicChemistry · · Tucson · Joined Jun 2016 · Points: 0

just use Red Oil and go climb :)

What is red oil

Mike Brady · · Van Diesel, OR · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 551
shoo wrote:

When you ask for medical advice from a climber's forum, you will receive ineffective medical advice from amateurs. Seek actual medical attention if you are concerned, or at the very least seek information from a source frequented by licensed medical professionals.

As far as I was able to tell, there is no published scientific study* or other credible medical recommendations to suggest that aloe will do anything for your toe. Do it if it'll make you feel good, but don't consider it a treatment.

* There is basically one relevant study published that I could locate. It is tiny, completely uncontrolled, deeply methodologically flawed, poorly written to boot, and published in a pay-to-play journal whose reputation is poor enough that they aren't even indexed in standard medical databases any more.

Source: A doctorate (edit: the PhD kind, not the MD kind) and a decade+ of experience in medical evidence.

Boooorrring

John Barritt · · OKC · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 888
sherb wrote:

H2O2 for his future wounds that he refuses to see a doctor for then.

No one else provided Hobo Greg with a rating and so I did. Since I don't know for sure, I gave a "5" to be wishy-washy, cuz I don't know.  Garbage in, garbage out.

Cleanliness is medical care 101. He put his feet up for public viewing.

Requested rating, Duhh...... So you're halfway to cut it off! Harsh! (I'll edit my Neosporin post to reflect my non-expert rating as well) At least no one is telling him to cut it off......... ;)

King Tut · · Citrus Heights · Joined Aug 2012 · Points: 200

If you value your ability to use your toe (ie walk/climb) then I would seek real medical consultation and treatment, not amateur opinions on the web.

Present at an ER with your concern about infection. **No one** can make a diagnosis of infection over the web. 

Yes, I am an MD.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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