Ropes (specifically dry coating)


Original Post
Nicole K · · SD · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 0

Anyone who has owned dry coated/core ropes: do you think the additional price is worth the added life to you rope if you don't regularly climb in overly wet/humid conditions?  Buying a new rope!    

and any specific brands/styles appreciated too!  

Nick Sweeney · · Spokane, WA · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 650

No

Tomily ma · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2011 · Points: 290

Yes. Or no. Half the people I know like dry ropes. The other half don't. That should clarify things. I currently have a dry rope and a non dry. I like them both. I have used mammut sterling petzl maxim and maybe something else. I liked them all. Anything between 9.2 and 10.3 I like. 

Get one that will look good as a rug when you retire it!!!!

Andrew Krajnik · · Plainfield, IL · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 253

Dry treatment supposedly helps prevent dirt from penetrating the rope, and theoretically extends life, so even if you don't expect to get it wet, there may be some benefit. Whether that benefit is proportional to the extra cost, however, remains to be seen. Has anyone on here used (and retired) both dry and standard ropes, in similar usage environments? I'd love to hear comments on just how much longer a dry rope actually lasts, if at all.

I personally sprang for dry ropes (I have 2), but have only been using them for 2 seasons; They both have a lot of life left in them before they need to be retired.

Nick Sweeney · · Spokane, WA · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 650
Andrew Krajnik wrote:

Dry treatment supposedly helps prevent dirt from penetrating the rope, and theoretically extends life, so even if you don't expect to get it wet, there may be some benefit. Whether that benefit is proportional to the extra cost, however, remains to be seen. Has anyone on here used (and retired) both dry and standard ropes, in similar usage environments? I'd love to hear comments on just how much longer a dry rope actually lasts, if at all.

I personally sprang for dry ropes (I have 2), but have only been using them for 2 seasons; They both have a lot of life left in them before they need to be retired.

I have used and retired dry and non-dry ropes.  If you aren't going to be using it where it is wet (mountaineering, ice climbing, etc), then the extra cost of dry treatment is really not worth it.  It will be totally worn off your rope within three months if you use it regularly.  I personally believe that for heavy cragging, you should focus on getting a good deal on a rope rather than the features - I figure that you replace ropes every 1-2 years anyway.

Nicole K · · SD · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 0
Tomily ma wrote:

Yes. Or no. Half the people I know like dry ropes. The other half don't. That should clarify things. I currently have a dry rope and a non dry. I like them both. I have used mammut sterling petzl maxim and maybe something else. 

Since you have both, do you feel like the dry rope coating has helped the sheath "Last longer".  And do you think it has improved the overal longevity of the rope?  and is your dry rope dry coated sheath or "sheath and core"

Thanks!  

Nicole K · · SD · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 0
Nick Sweeney wrote:

I have used and retired dry and non-dry ropes.  If you aren't going to be using it where it is wet (mountaineering, ice climbing, etc), then the extra cost of dry treatment is really not worth it.  It will be totally worn off your rope within three months if you use it regularly.  I personally believe that for heavy cragging, you should focus on getting a good deal on a rope rather than the features - I figure that you replace ropes every 1-2 years anyway.

So if the dry rope coating is worn off in 3 months with reagular use, that means it won't work well in a wet environment either.  and are you speaking in the context of dry coating of the sheath or dry coating of "sheath and core" It seems if you get the core coating that would likely stay with use?  

Nicole K · · SD · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 0

If anyone knows of articles on the specs of dry coating sheath and/or core/sheath coating, let me know! feel free to post here.  Or reviews on different types of ropes :)  or deals!  thanks mountain project community!  

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530

Some rope brands (Sterling and Edelrid come to mind) have standard dry coatings on their sheathes of some (Edelrid) or all (Sterling) of their ropes. The idea behind this is that it reduces friction of the core strands moving against each other and prolongs the ropes life. As to whether or not thats true....who knows- i can say that for me personally, Sterling and Edelrid ropes last longer than other brands- but just as many people will tell you the opposite, so its all user experience anyway.

If you're not ice climbing or climbing in alpine conditions, I wouldn't bother with a dry coating on the sheathe as it will wear off quickly. 

Dry coated ropes are best for ice and snow where the coating wont wear off as quickly and protect the rope from getting wet when the ice and snow melt. 

ViperScale · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2013 · Points: 230

If you aren't climbing ice / alpine don't bother with dry coating.

20 kN · · Hawaii · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 1,352

Absolutely not. Dry coatings are not worth the $50+ they add to the rope, especially considering they can wear off in as little as three weeks, unless you're climbing ice, snow, ect.

Nick Drake · · Newcastle, WA · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 478

Since no one else said it, if you are climbing ice don't bust out the dry ropes you've drug over a lot of rock. Unless you forgot your belay parka and want to break apart a frozen cable to get through your belay device.

Tomily ma · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2011 · Points: 290

If you have money to burn, get a bi pattern dry rope. Otherwise you can at least 3 standard ropes to 2 dry ropes. You can get great ropes on sale for the low $100s. You can get a great rope for $350 too.  Just buy a rope already and like it! Nothing beats a new rope!

Dave Kos · · Temecula, CA · Joined Jan 2011 · Points: 55

I always use a dry rope for gym leads.  

Just in case.

Nicole K · · SD · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 0
Dave Kos wrote:

I always use a dry rope for gym leads.  

Just in case.

this definately made me smile.   

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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