WTB: Roof Top Tent



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Original Post
Mike Womack · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined Mar 2014 · Points: 1,297

Anyone selling a roof top tent in the LA area?  Thanks everyone.

randy88fj62 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2010 · Points: 103

My buddy is selling one. pm me for details. He doesnt have a mp account.

This is his website. He has new ones and one slightly used he is selling.
https://overlandlabs.com/

AndrewArroz · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 0

Serious question here. What's the big gain in having one of those? Is it that they're "pop-ups" and therefore save you time? Or is it the novelty of sleeping on the roof of a car. Because I can imagine all sorts of downsides. The biggest of which is I can't hop in my car and drive somewhere without taking down my tent.

jdereks · · Minnesota · Joined Dec 2015 · Points: 30
AndrewArroz wrote:

Serious question here. What's the big gain in having one of those? Is it that they're "pop-ups" and therefore save you time? Or is it the novelty of sleeping on the roof of a car. Because I can imagine all sorts of downsides. The biggest of which is I can't hop in my car and drive somewhere without taking down my tent.

I think you're right about the novelty factor. It's a big, expensive novelty that doesn't really provide much value other than being able to show off your $2k tent. 

But they're pretty cool. 

Andrew Krajnik · · Plainfield, IL · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 50
AndrewArroz wrote:

Serious question here. What's the big gain in having one of those? Is it that they're "pop-ups" and therefore save you time? Or is it the novelty of sleeping on the roof of a car. Because I can imagine all sorts of downsides. The biggest of which is I can't hop in my car and drive somewhere without taking down my tent.

I've heard they're popular in Australia, where there is an advantage in being able to avoid dangerous reptiles and insects (You're far less likely to end up with a snake or scorpion in your tent with one of these).

I've also heard the time-saving argument, as well as the fact that when road-tripping, you can overnight in areas where a standard tent wouldn't be practical/allowed. (Apparently, people will deploy these in Walmart parking lots, for instance.)

AndrewArroz · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 0
Andrew Krajnik wrote:

I've heard they're popular in Australia, where there is an advantage in being able to avoid dangerous reptiles and insects (You're far less likely to end up with a snake or scorpion in your tent with one of these).

I've also heard the time-saving argument, as well as the fact that when road-tripping, you can overnight in areas where a standard tent wouldn't be practical/allowed. (Apparently, people will deploy these in Walmart parking lots, for instance.)

Yeah, I get the value in Australia or Africa. I just have a hard time imagining breaking down my tent every time I want to drive to a different climbing area in J-tree, just for example.

My wife and I took a trip last summer borrowing a friends mini-teardrop trailer. That was AWESOME. I'd rather have on of those than a rooftop tent. Though we're talking different price ranges, for sure.

Andrew Krajnik · · Plainfield, IL · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 50
AndrewArroz wrote:

Yeah, I get the value in Australia or Africa. I just have a hard time imagining breaking down my tent every time I want to drive to a different climbing area in J-tree, just for example.

My wife and I took a trip last summer borrowing a friends mini-teardrop trailer. That was AWESOME. I'd rather have on of those than a rooftop tent. Though we're talking different price ranges, for sure.

Agreed, I also have a hard time wrapping my head around the cost/benefit equation for this in the US, given that it cuts down on your mobility once you've established camp.

And I'll echo your enthusiasm for the tear-drop, as well. I've never camped in one, but they look sweet. If you build your own, they're actually fairly reasonable. Chesapeake Light Craft (known for their stitch-and-glue build-your-own wooden kayak kits) makes a tear-drop kit that you can put on your own trailer. (Here's the webpage.) Hell, if you have your own source for the plywood, they'll even sell you the plans and manual for $200!

Mike Womack · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined Mar 2014 · Points: 1,297

At first, I had mixed feelings about them just like jdereks but this seems to fit the bill for me right now.  I enjoy camping but not necessarily "hanging out at camp" so I don't mind the loftiness.  Also, what my wife, daughter and I have been doing recently is letting our daughter sleep in the car instead of us, crack a window open, and then sleep on the ground outside...  maybe a tent.  This works - but isn't that comfortable.  Now, my wife and I can sleep uptop and feel a bit better about the sleeping arrangements. Also, you can get an annex for it and allow space for 2 more people.  Worth a shot, right?

Anyone out there who owns one and has an opinion?

jdereks · · Minnesota · Joined Dec 2015 · Points: 30
Mike Womack wrote:

Anyone out there who owns one and has an opinion?

I was (mostly) messing around. I've talked with a few people who have them and they seem to love it. One has his on thule rails above the bed of his ranger which allows for bikes/storage underneath. They're hard to come by though. I recently talked with Yakima and they're low on stock. REI has some. 

randy88fj62 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2010 · Points: 103

Advantages of a RTT:
-Sleeping off the ground away from ants/critters and off wet swampy ground.
-Thick foam mat and sleeping gear doesn't have to be stored in your car and doesn't have to be unloaded when you get home.
-The large ones sleep three full 6'5" adults in comfort.
-You can add on an "annex" room below for privacy or lounge space away from misquitos.
-Security from people or animals (some people fear Bears etc)

Cons of a RTT:
-No fun in high winds unless heavily guy lined out.
-Must fold over and clip straps to drive to next spot.
-Peeing in the middle of the night requires a step down the ladder.

I used to have one until I lifted my truck too high and freeway instability became a concern. Now I glamp with a turbotent which pops up into a 4 person mansion in 2 minutes.

AndrewArroz · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 0
randy88fj62 wrote:

Cons of a RTT:
-No fun in high winds unless heavily guy lined out.

The wind thing was another concern of mine. I have a big SUV  and I can imagine with a 3 person tent on it things would sway and flap a LOT in the wind.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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