flying with ropes to Europe (Dolomites) - conundrum


Original Post
Sergey Shelukhin · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2014 · Points: 0

So we are planning to do some multi-pitch in the Dolomites and many of the routes seem to require 60m rappels. All my ropes are either beefy 70m single ropes, or short. 

What would be the best rope to buy for Dolomites, that is (1) light (to avoid checking bags), (2) cheap (since I don't expect to use them on most trips, and I do not climb ice), (3) good :D Ultra-thin (~7mm) twin ropes that are $90-100 a piece look attractive, but they are mostly recommended for ice, I'm not sure if it's a good idea with abrasion on the rock. Half ropes are more versatile, but bulkier and more expensive.

Thoughts?

Would it be practical to buy twin/half ropes in Dolomites so we only have to check them one way?

Robert Hall · · North Conway, NH · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 12,123

I believe twin ropes also have a larger % elongation during a fall....less of a problem (???) on ice,... but on rock" watch out" for that ledge below. 

Maybe consider one of the newer single-rope-rated 8.7 to 9.2 ropes, plus 60m of 7mm or 8mm "tag-line" (?)  Just a thought. 

"Cheap", "light" and "good" are tough to find together ! 


 


Bruce Hildenbrand · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2003 · Points: 945

I am not sure what routes you are planning to do, but all the long, multi-pitch routes we did in the Dolomites required 50m ropes.

Evan18 · · Boulder, CO · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 0

Ropes are suprisingly cheap in Italy, you can get some great deals.  Seems like it is mostly on the European brands- I am not sure if it is because of the exchange rate, customs, etc but I thought about just buying one there rather than flying with one.

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 490
Sergey Shelukhin wrote:

So we are planning to do some multi-pitch in the Dolomites and many of the routes seem to require 60m rappels. All my ropes are either beefy 70m single ropes, or short. 

What would be the best rope to buy for Dolomites, that is (1) light (to avoid checking bags), (2) cheap (since I don't expect to use them on most trips, and I do not climb ice), (3) good :D Ultra-thin (~7mm) twin ropes that are $90-100 a piece look attractive, but they are mostly recommended for ice, I'm not sure if it's a good idea with abrasion on the rock. Half ropes are more versatile, but bulkier and more expensive.

Thoughts?

Would it be practical to buy twin/half ropes in Dolomites so we only have to check them one way?

I use 60m twin/half rated 7.8´s in the Dolomites because of some of the abseils. Done plenty of routes on a 60m single though as well, depends on the descents, lots of them have short raps or you escape down a via ferrata. Got well caught out once taking an 80m single and running pitches together but failing to summit! A pair of 7.8´s will set you back around €190 at the moment depending on brand.

kenr · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 10,544
Robert Hall wrote:

I believe twin ropes also have a larger % elongation during a fall....less of a problem (???) on ice,... but on rock" watch out" for that ledge below. 

Maybe consider one of the newer single-rope-rated 8.7 to 9.2 ropes, plus 60m of 7mm or 8mm "tag-line" (?)  Just a thought. 

Yes -- and building on these ideas . . .

If you bring your 70m single, then you can use that for cragging on those days (and the Dolomites will offer them) when the high rock is not available.

If you purchase a half-rope (not a twin), it is rated to take Leader falls when used as a single strand -- so you for routes well within your climbing capability (so you do not expect to take multiple falls) -- and do not require rappel descent -- you could consider bringing that only as a single rope.

If you purchase a light twin as a "tag line" . . .
Well the big problem with a truly light "tag line" (say 6mm non-dynamic) - (not twin-rated) - is that if your 70m single rope gets stuck when pulling it on rappel (easy to happen with the featured Dolomite rock), then you have to Lead back up to un-stick your rope on a skinny rope not at all intended to hold a leader-fall esp w possible abrasion / cutting.
But pulling your rappel with a rope rated as a "twin", to retrieve a stuck rope, you could fold it so you're Leading on both strands simultaneously -- "twinned" like it's designed to be used for Leading. So if your 70m rope is not stuck / jammed too high, you could reach it with a rope-safe lead on your twin pulling-rope.

Ken

P.S. Note that with half-ropes, because they have less elongation than twins, you're not supposed to clip both strands thru the same protection. But I've seen lots of expert Euro climbers clip both strands through the first prot above the belay - (I think because they're afraid the belayer (without gloves) might lose control of the rope if need to hold a hard fall while grasping only a single active strand with the other strand inactive).

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Post a Reply

Log In to Reply