repairing heel rubber


Original Post
Baba Fats · · Philadelphia, PA · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 0

I've got a pair of Vapor V's that I absolutely love.  But during the last few days of climbing I've been working on a problem that require a nasty heel hook, and that extra strip of rubber on the heel of my shoe is starting to shred and separate from the sole (causing my heel to not be able to hold my weight at that angle).  It only affects my climbing on that 1 problem, so I don't see any need to resole, or get a new pair.  I want to try doing a quick fix myself before I take more drastic measures.  

Do you guys have any insight on the types of glues that A) work on climbing rubber, and B) don't dry rock hard like super glue or gorilla glue.  I was thinking about trying some type of caulk glue.  What to you think?

The shoes are about 7 months old,  the soles are wearing down, but still have a good amount of life in them.

Jon Nelson · · Bellingham, WA · Joined Sep 2011 · Points: 4,695

It is common for people to use barge cement. I've used it quite a bit for rubber-to-leather gluing and it holds up well if done according to directions. Cobblers might also use it. 

Baba Fats · · Philadelphia, PA · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 0

It would actually be rubber to rubber gluing.  The Vapors have an extra patch of textured rubber over the rubber heel

Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,740
Baba Fats wrote:

It world actually be rubber to rubber gluing.  The Vapors have an extra patch of textured rubber over the rubber heel

Barge Cement is ideal for that.  THIN layer on each, let dry, heat them up, press together HARD.

Baba Fats · · Philadelphia, PA · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 0

I have some C clamps.  Would those work to hold it until it dries?  Or would that deform the heel too much?

Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,740

The barge cement is already "dry" when you push the pieces together.  You only need to hold them until the cement cools (cold, dried Barge almost doesn't stick even to itself.  It's quite a tough solid at room temp, that's why you need to heat the thin films to get it to work.)  I don't use a clamp of any sort; just hold the pieces tight in your hands while you watch TV for 5 min. or so.  It's not cooled down yet but IME this is adequate to keep the bits from coming apart.  Having said all that, I think C clamps would be fine.

Baba Fats · · Philadelphia, PA · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 0

Sounds good.  Is a hair dryer going to be hot enough to heat the cement?  I don't have a heat gun

Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,740
Baba Fats wrote:

Sounds good.  Is a hair dryer going to be hot enough to heat the cement?  I don't have a heat gun

A halogen desk lamp about 6-8 in. away will do it.  A hair dryer MIGHT be hot enough, esp. if you carefully cover the intake vents (not totally, or it'll overheat and shut down BTDT)

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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