Record snowpacks


Original Post
Old lady H · · Boise, Idaho · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 120

Idaho's mountains had record snowfall (all time records, in some cases) in December, January, and now February is official too.

Precipitation for February ranged from 150 to 500% over average, wreaking havoc all winter, and the flooding, which has been going for quite a while, isn't even the big stuff yet.

I know Idaho is not alone at all in this, so please plan your trips to the west very carefully, and check the conditions. It might be tough and dangerous much, much later in the season this year for places like the Sawtooths (Elephants Perch) and the Lost River range (Mount Borah), in Idaho, and others can post up here, if they wish, for their areas.

On the other hand, you kayakers might have city street whitewater if our water managers have to raise the Boise river much higher! It's really ripping right now (8,000cfs). Pretty impressive when I bike beside it on my commute!

Best, Helen, in Boise, Idaho

King Tut · · Citrus Heights · Joined Aug 2012 · Points: 200
Old lady H wrote:Idaho's mountains had record snowfall (all time records, in some cases) in December, January, and now February is official too. Precipitation for February ranged from 150 to 500% over average, wreaking havoc all winter, and the flooding, which has been going for quite a while, isn't even the big stuff yet. I know Idaho is not alone at all in this, so please plan your trips to the west very carefully, and check the conditions. It might be tough and dangerous much, much later in the season this year for places like the Sawtooths (Elephants Perch) and the Lost River range (Mount Borah), in Idaho, and others can post up here, if they wish, for their areas. On the other hand, you kayakers might have city street whitewater if our water managers have to raise the Boise river much higher! It's really ripping right now (8,000cfs). Pretty impressive when I bike beside it on my commute! Best, Helen, in Boise, Idaho
Heheh...when we were having our little dam trouble out here in Jan. they were releasing 150,000 CFS from the spillway at Oroville (largest earthen dam in the USA at 707 feet) to try and save the spillway from collapsing endangering ~200,000 lives.

That's the Feather River and that is just one tributary of the Sacramento which at peak flows can get to 300,000 CFS.

Its not quite the mighty Columbia but there is gonna be a whole lot of water moving this spring in the West.

And noobs are asking in the forums if Tuolumne Meadows will be good in May lol. The pass will still be under 30' of snow in May.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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