Simple Training Advice


Original Post
_Ish_ _ · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2017 · Points: 0

Hi everybody. I'm new to the forum (actually to forums in general) but figured I would join to ask some friendly advice from the community.

I am looking for some simple training/workouts I can do as a supplemental exercise.

I do want to mention that I am not looking for some kind of magic workout that requires little effort for big gains. I'm realistic about this. If I have a training schedule that is too demanding I'll hit it hard for a couple weeks and then it will fade. That's why I am posting call for advice, to find something relatively simple to do, in addition to climbing, that will provide slight improvements. I would like to be more fit in general, so the workouts don't have to be climbing specific but climbing takes priority. I have seen some training programs that alternate between gym routines weeks and climbing weeks. That doesn't interest me cause it won't help my technique.

So, here's where I'm at: I'm a 5.10 gym climber and I climb 3 days a week for 2 hours. I have two questions:

1. What I can do on my off days?
2. What should I do after climbing?

Concerning question 1:
Should I be resting my arms and just doing cardio? Are there exercises I should do that target muscles that aren't used climbing?

Concerning question 2:
If I don't max out my arms after a climbing session (cause my partner needs to leave for work) should I go boulder until I can't climb anymore? should I lift some weights until I can't lift anymore? should I just keep some days light?

Again, I know something "simple" isn't going to get me ripped and that's not what I'm looking for. I'm just trying to get a little more fit by maximizing my climbing days and/or including something on my off-days.

Thanks for any help you can give! It is greatly appreciated and I'm excited to join the community.

Ish

jaredj · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2013 · Points: 0

Can you give an honest assessment of your overall athletic makeup, and background?

Are you a lean endurance athlete type who's done running / cycling / triathon a lot? Straight off the couch with not much of an active lifestyle background? Gym rat with a lot of lifting experience?

How do you feel about your body composition / weight? Do you feel that weight loss is "low hanging fruit" for improving your climbing?

CornCob · · Sandy, UT · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 0

Check out this book. One of the best resources out there for climbing training.

aikibujin · · Castle Rock, CO · Joined Oct 2014 · Points: 200
_Ish_ _ wrote:I have two questions: 1. What I can do on my off days? Concerning question 1: Should I be resting my arms and just doing cardio? Are there exercises I should do that target muscles that aren't used climbing?
If your focus is on improve your climbing, you really don’t need to do much on your rest days. If you enjoy cardio work like running, or some antagonist muscle exercises, you can do them. But the improvement to your climbing from those will be fairly limited unless you’re in really bad shape. The injury preventative benefit of antagonist muscle exercises such as pushups and shoulder presses is fairly anecdotal. The exercises outlined in this article may be more useful for injury prevention.
http://blackdiamondequipment.com/en_US/experience-story?cid=esther-smith-elbow-pain-in-climbers

_Ish_ _ wrote:2. What should I do after climbing? Concerning question 2: If I don't max out my arms after a climbing session (cause my partner needs to leave for work) should I go boulder until I can't climb anymore? should I lift some weights until I can't lift anymore? should I just keep some days light?
If you’re always trying to “max out” your arms when you go climbing every single time, you may be digging yourself too deep into the recovery hole. The first time you went climbing you probably couldn’t turn a door knob after, but that's not the feeling you're going for now that you’re been climbing 3 times a week. I’ll train to exhaustion when I’m working on my endurance, but I would only do that for two weeks or less. It’s better to end your workout tired, but not beat up, so you can recover better and be stronger when you come back.
Brandon.Phillips · · Alabama · Joined May 2011 · Points: 0

+ 1 for the Rock climbers training manual.

You don't have to feel destroyed to have a good work out. Weights can be good for training antagonist muscles (the muscles not used when climbing). Good cardio endurance helps for longer routes and things below your maximal effort. The hangboard is really good at building finger strength.

You can probably never have too much core strength. Dead lifts are awesome for your back and are probably the most useful weight lift for climbing.

Get 8 hours of sleep and drink a protein shake post workout. Take rest days.

Training beta podcast has some good episodes with trainers. Anderson bros and Steve Bechtel are the best ones in my opinion.

https://www.trainingbeta.com/media/tbp-007-steve-bechtel-training-power-endurance-running-weight-loss/

Eric Horst also has some good stuff for free online- like training power without being in the gym.

_Ish_ _ · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2017 · Points: 0

thanks everybody for the great advice.

concerning the shape I'm in, I'm definitely not muscular but I stay pretty active. I don't exercise routinely but I do snowboard, climb, dive, raft, hike, canoe, etc. so it's not like I'm living on the couch. I'm 33, 6ft, 160lbs with 16% body fat.

the exercise I want to do on the rest days isn't just to improve climbing but also to get that 16% down to a lower number and overall just be healthier.

working on antagonist muscles is the answer to a question that I didn't articulate well in my first post. I'll see what I can do about that. I just have been unsure of what I can do on "rest" days that
-will be good for my health
-not be some insane workout routine
-won't be detrimental to my climbing (i.e. pushing my muscles too far too many days in a row)

clearly any weight loss or muscle building would help out with climbing (and be welcomed in general) but I realize that no workout is going to improve my climbing as much as just climbing.

good to know about not maxing out my arms everytime. that's been one of the big questions for me "how hard do I push myself on climb days?"

thanks for the book recommendation, I'll see if my library has it and if not, I'll take to the internet to get a copy.

I appreciate all the advice.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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