Has anyone purchased the new anasazi blancos?


Original Post
Jonathan Boucher · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2017 · Points: 0

Hi, I am new here, but I am looking into getting a new pair of shoes that is better at really sticking it on small chips. I currently have the butora acros, and while they are great on anything overhanging with either pockets, jugs, or slopers, they seem to not always be the best on tiny footholds and small crimps.
If anyone has a shoe that would be better for this let me know (but dont say solution, they slip out of my small heels.)

I am making this post since I cannot find any reviews/discussions here with the search bar and I couldnt find any reviews of the new ones online (only the discontinued ones). Just post your overall thoughts on these shoes, and if they are worth it!

Sammyastra · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2015 · Points: 0
Optimistic · · New Paltz · Joined Aug 2007 · Points: 282

Am I reading you right that you are speaking about small holds in the gym? That's what I think of when someone says "small chips"...

If so I might think of looking a little at either the fit of your current shoes (too big?) or technique. Essentially any gym hold will be far larger than the footholds I routinely encounter outside. It's not at all uncommon for a face hold on a Gunks 10 to be in the range of 1/8",something I never have to deal with indoors. All 4 of my shoes (TC Pro, Tenaya Tarifa, Anasazi Vcs and (not surprisingly) Katana Lace) handle these holds fine.

My apologies if I misunderstood your question though, maybe you're talking about outdoor climbing, but I guess my answer might be similar.

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45

So I agree with the general sentiment that if you're climbing in a gym, intense edging is never really an issue. A soft shoe like the Acro may not be ideal for standing on these holds, but it should be able to get the job done. I don't think a $200 shoe is really a good investment for indoor edging, but if you do, you'll probably notice a difference due to the stiffness. If you're trying to stand on outdoor edges, you definitely will notice a difference. All of the shoes the above poster mentioned will also do well, however, and are cheaper.

Jonathan Boucher · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2017 · Points: 0

Im planning on getting outside more this summer and currently in my gym my butora's work on everything, but arent always the greatest. That being said, where I live there is mainly just slab, so I figured getting a pair wouldn't be the worst idea either. Im just looking for another pair of shoes that are more comfortable and better at edging. I guess what I am really asking is

1. Are these good on slab?

2. Are they comfortable enough for trad climbing?

Optimistic · · New Paltz · Joined Aug 2007 · Points: 282
Jonathan Boucher wrote:Im planning on getting outside more this summer and currently in my gym my butora's work on everything, but arent always the greatest. That being said, where I live there is mainly just slab, so I figured getting a pair wouldn't be the worst idea either. Im just looking for another pair of shoes that are more comfortable and better at edging. I guess what I am really asking is 1. Are these good on slab? 2. Are they comfortable enough for trad climbing?
Can't speak to that specific shoe, but typically the better a shoe edges (stiffer) the less it's going to conform to the rock while smearing, and the less sensitive it's going to be. Full lug sole hiking boots would be an extreme example of this, they edge really well if you can figure out whether you're on the hold or not. But not so good for smearing/slab.
Kevin Mcbride · · Nelson · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 155
Jonathan Boucher wrote:Im planning on getting outside more this summer and currently in my gym my butora's work on everything, but arent always the greatest. That being said, where I live there is mainly just slab, so I figured getting a pair wouldn't be the worst idea either. Im just looking for another pair of shoes that are more comfortable and better at edging. I guess what I am really asking is 1. Are these good on slab? 2. Are they comfortable enough for trad climbing?
I have tested the new blancos for a few days and here is my summary: these shoes are great for one thing, hard ass edging. For smearing they are too stiff and insensitive, they work alright but are very unnerving on most smears. The blancos are not a comfortable shoe, with a heel rand tighter than a virgin asshole I could only wear the shoes for 2 maybe 3 pitches before my feet were totally mangled. Ok for cracks, TC pro's are better if you're going that route. I wouldn't buy them, I personally like the TC pro much more, and for hard edging its damn hard to beat the miura vs. But fuck can the blancos demolish thin vertical climbing.
KennyJoe Sabine · · zOmBiE = from = OUTER-SPACE · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 65

Take your favorite pair of old worn out climbing shoes,
and have them re-soled with a mid sole.

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45
Kevin Mcbride wrote: I have tested the new blancos for a few days and here is my summary: these shoes are great for one thing, hard ass edging. For smearing they are too stiff and insensitive, they work alright but are very unnerving on most smears. The blancos are not a comfortable shoe, with a heel rand tighter than a virgin asshole I could only wear the shoes for 2 maybe 3 pitches before my feet were totally mangled. Ok for cracks, TC pro's are better if you're going that route. I wouldn't buy them, I personally like the TC pro much more, and for hard edging its damn hard to beat the miura vs. But fuck can the blancos demolish thin vertical climbing.
Knowing the Anasazi line, I would give the Blancos some time before judging them. They all start super stiff and clunky but after breaking in are amazing. The Whites have a plastic midsole that might keep them stiffer than say the Pinks or VCS, but I bet they'll still soften a bit and get much more sensitive if they're anything like the Pinks.

Speaking of which, TS: you'd be hard-pressed to find a better slab shoe than the Anasazi Pink. If you prefer Velcro the Tan is pretty similar.
Noah Yetter · · Lakewood, CO · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 10
KennyJoe Sabine wrote: Take your favorite pair of old worn out climbing shoes, and have them re-soled with a mid sole.
Who offers this service? I'd love a pair of Moccs with a midsole...
Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45

That would be the Pinks...

Nick Drake · · Newcastle, WA · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 438
Kevin Mcbride wrote: But fuck can the blancos demolish thin vertical climbing.
Seems perfect for smith. Get a chance to to any conglomerate nubbins?
Kevin Mcbride · · Nelson · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 155
Ted Pinson wrote: Knowing the Anasazi line, I would give the Blancos some time before judging them. They all start super stiff and clunky but after breaking in are amazing. The Whites have a plastic midsole that might keep them stiffer than say the Pinks or VCS, but I bet they'll still soften a bit and get much more sensitive if they're anything like the Pinks. Speaking of which, TS: you'd be hard-pressed to find a better slab shoe than the Anasazi Pink. If you prefer Velcro the Tan is pretty similar.
Excellent point, my buddy put more days in them since I last tested them, I just talked to him about that. Apparently they have lost a little stiffness but he says they are still super stiff, he claims stiffer than when his pinks when they were new. 5.10 really put a lot of thought into making sure the shoes kept their stiffness, which would make sense given this shoes intended purpose. Pink and tan VS are better all around shoes, blanco is kind of a speciality shoe for very specific kinds of climbing.
Kevin Mcbride · · Nelson · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 155
Nick Drake wrote: Seems perfect for smith. Get a chance to to any conglomerate nubbins?
I tested them on granite, gneiss, and a little bit of limestone. Unfortunately no conglomerate.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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