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Beal Unicore Golden Dry Ropes: The Tiger 10mm or the Flyer 10.2mm???


Original Post
JasonSH · · unknown · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 90

Trying to make a decision here. I read one review, I think it was via Climbing magazine, that said the 10mm seemed much skinnier than 10mm. It did hold up amazingly well.
It got me thinking about ease of belay and rappel...would it slide "to well/much" or be perfectly fine at Beal's 10mm?

Or,..

Would I just be better off going with their 10.2mm Flyer unicore rope, if they run on the skinny side since the unicore bonds the sheath to the core?

What do you guys think who have some experience with them??
Thanks!

sherb · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2012 · Points: 60

No experience with the 10.0mm Beal Tiger, but these days 10.0mm is not too skinny, so even if it feels skinner than a 10.0 catching on it shouldn't be a problem. Most people like 9.4-9.8mm.

I have a Beal 10.2mm Flyer II which is fat by today's standards. I also have a skinny Sterling 9.1mm 70m rope for special occasions, so I used the Beal a lot more. It feels stiff compared to other people's ropes, and therefore sometimes feeding thru the grigri takes more work because it can get curly. After 5 years the calendar says I should retire it, but except for the black aluminum oxide, it still has great integrity. It has no flat spots whatsoever, it is still cylindrical all over. It also has no core shots, and the sheath is not fuzzy anywhere. If it's got unicore that might explain why there is no slippage between the sheath and core. I never had the need to cut the ends. It might be slightly less stretchy than before, but still enough stretch. It used to be way too stretchy.

I'm under 150lbs (I think that's the standard weight for testing equipment) so for me rappelling on a skinnier rope is better due to being faster. It can be awkwardly slow to start a rappel on a thicker rope. If you're heavier, you might want a thicker rope for more friction.

I guess it depends on whether you think you'll take lots of falls and load over a lot edges, whether you want to keep your rope for many years, how heavy you are, or if you want a lighter rope for the approach and clipping.

JasonSH · · unknown · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 90
Ana Tine wrote:No experience with the 10.0mm Beal Tiger, but these days 10.0mm is not too skinnIf you're heavier, you might want a thicker rope for more friction. I guess it depends on whether you think you'll take lots of falls and load over a lot edges, whether you want to keep your rope for many years, how heavy you are, or if you want a lighter rope for the approach and clipping.
So you use the Flyer II? Thanks for replying with your experiences with it!

I actually weigh 179 and I'm dropping weight. Short term goal of 175 by end of March. So, that's another things i"m figuring into the decision.

I climb nothing but trad, with the occasional top ropping setup for friends now and then, but I have another workhorse rope for that purpose. Started ice climbing this year so this would be used on ice next winter as well.
In climbing this year I'm looking to push myself more on trad, and that will include falling no doubt. That's why I'm on the fence as far as what size? I belay with a Grigri so there's that, and I want to make sure its not going to feed like crap through the device!
My climbing partners usually use either the Gri, or the Trango Cinch.
jeep gaskin · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 10

i use a golden dry unicore tiger, 2 years old. great rope. it was slick when i got it but broke in fairly quickly. just washed it for the second time. used a soft brush and a tub of water, no soap. pulled it from the tub and it drip dried in the shade on a 60 degree day in an afternoon. in the old days even super dry ropes would retain water after a couple of years of use. not so with this beal. worth the dollars in my opinion

Nick Drake · · Newcastle, WA · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 483

Most people are using 9.8ish ropes for their workhorses now. I can't see myself buying anything larger.

Get one of their dc or non coated ropes for rock. Buy another gd rope for ice next fall. Seriously don't take a rope you use on rock a lot on ice, you're going to have a bad time! Even with the coated core you'll have so much ice on the sheath from wet routes. Joker is great for ice.

JasonSH · · unknown · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 90
Nick Drake wrote:Most people are using 9.8ish ropes for their workhorses now. I can't see myself buying anything larger. Get one of their dc or non coated ropes for rock. Buy another gd rope for ice next fall. Seriously don't take a rope you use on rock a lot on ice, you're going to have a bad time! Even with the coated core you'll have so much ice on the sheath from wet routes. Joker is great for ice.
Thanks for the suggestions/info.
Nick Drake · · Newcastle, WA · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 483

You're welcome, was very glad we were climbing in a party of three when our ropes froze so badly you couldn't feed them through an atc. I actually flexed and broke up the ice passing up to the belayer. That was an extreme case, but same day our friends were using a newer joker and it handled the water so well.

JasonSH · · unknown · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 90
jeep gaskin wrote:i use a golden dry unicore tiger, 2 years old. great rope. it was slick when i got it but broke in fairly quickly. just washed it for the second time. used a soft brush and a tub of water, no soap. pulled it from the tub and it drip dried in the shade on a 60 degree day in an afternoon. in the old days even super dry ropes would retain water after a couple of years of use. not so with this beal. worth the dollars in my opinion
Nice!
JK- · · SLC · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 58

I <3 the Beal Tiger.

I also regularly use a Beal 10.2, but the diablo rather than the flyer, and like it a lot. But less than the tiger.

JasonSH · · unknown · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 90

Well, I pulled the trigger and ordered the Beal Tiger 10mm 60m rope.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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