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Quickdraw shelf life


Original Post
MClay · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 710

How long do quickdraws last if not used?

I've been reading all my old gear packaging inserts and most manufacturers give approximations for ropes and harnesses. However, my new quickdraws say nothing about their prescribed longevity. Also, if you just happened upon some old draws in good condition that had been stored optimally, how old of draws would you still use?

Scott McMahon · · Boulder, CO · Joined Feb 2006 · Points: 1,425

You'll find both opinions here. Some people replace their soft goods per recommendations.

My softgood I've had however long I've had them. I keep them stored, out of sunlight, non-contaminated and not fuzzy. I'll climb on them till they get fuzzy or worn out. Ropes too.

Ken Noyce · · Layton, UT · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 2,122
MClay wrote:How long do quickdraws last if not used? I've been reading all my old gear packaging inserts and most manufacturers give approximations for ropes and harnesses. However, my new quickdraws say nothing about their prescribed longevity. Also, if you just happened upon some old draws in good condition that had been stored optimally, how old of draws would you still use?
They've got at least a 15 year shelf life, but that is being very conservative, and as long as they are stored out of sunlight in a dry condition I wouldn't be worried about falling onto 25 year old quick draws.
Tim Lutz · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2012 · Points: 5

you're...

..not gunna die!

Robin S · · OR · Joined Jun 2016 · Points: 30

15 year old QDs should be fine as long as they're not worn and stored in a dark place. That said, nylon does deteriorate over time, regardless of where you store it. I have draws that are probably 20 yrs old but I've stopped climbing on them, mostly just for piece of mind--I don't want to have an doubt that my draws are good.

Most manufacturers recommend retiring soft goods after 5-8 years, depending on use, just for reference. They're of course conservative.

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530

I'd say 10 years personally.

if you're at all concerned, just replace the dog bones.

Weakday Climber · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2006 · Points: 50

The irony of this subject is that after 15 to 20 years of proper storage you will hang these draws on your project and take whippers all over them! Then leave them outside during the winter so that everyone can take falls on them too.

Drederek · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2004 · Points: 315

Ha! I gave my 20 year old draws to a kid to hang on his projects!

20 kN · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 1,348

This is what Beal says, and keep in mind the numbers are conservative:

"Average lifetime in use :
- Intensive and daily use : 6 months
- Daily use of average intensity : 1 year
- Weekly and intensive use : 1 year
- Weekly use of average intensity : 2 years
- Periodic daily use of average intensity : 3 years
- Several uses during the year of average intensity : 5 years
- Very occasional light use : 10 years.
Attention : These are average lifetimes in use, a rope could be destroyed during its first use. Proper storage between uses is essential. The lifetime of the rope in use must never exceed 10 years.
The total maximum lifetime (storage before use + lifetime in use) is thus limited to 15 years."


bealplanet.com/notices/cila…

Robin S wrote:That said, nylon does deteriorate over time, regardless of where you store it.
Not by any meaningful amount. The product would need to be decades old for time alone to have any real effect. I've seen 10-year-old slings that were brand new get pull tested and fail above their rated capacity. I probably wouldent climb on the first nylon sling ever invented, but an 8-year-old sling that's brand new? Not a problem at all IMO.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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