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How to really get into training


Original Post
Graham Haynie · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2017 · Points: 0

I know this is a rather general question, but
how does one actually get into training? I've seen so many different workouts and routines and stuff online but it seems like there's no linear way to establish a routine/ determine what exactly needs to be done. If someone's asked this before, please point me to their post. I'm starting to plateu at V6 (don't do any training, just climb) and have been told training is major key.
Thanks.

David Kutassy · · Charlottesville, VA · Joined Feb 2015 · Points: 5

I haven't trained for rock climbing yet but from my experience with other exercise I imagine it's a very personal process. Especially with climbing if you try to replicate someone else's training plan you might end up getting injured from the strain on tendons. I think just climbing more often and practicing perfect technique on routes that are just under your limit would yield good results. This way you'll build strength and skill. Also try to switch up what kind of holds you climb on. Slopers require different muscle and technique than crimps. If all you climb on are crimps you'll suck on a route with slopers.

For cycling and running there are tons of "plans" you can follow but for most people they're BS or at least vauge guidelines. For example you might start a schedule to train for a marathon. Well maybe Sunday you're supposed to run 15 miles according to your calendar but your body just isn't up to the task today. Climbing can be the same; some days your strong so take advantage of them. Other days you won't be on your game so just lap some fun easy routes.

Proper diet is huge of course. You can train all you want but without giving your body the ingredients to build muscle and tendon strength you won't be getting anywhere. Obviously protein helps build muscle and tendon strength. Vitamin C is actually a critical ingredient that your body uses to produce collagen that repairs and strengthens your tendons. Don't skimp on vegetables to get magnesium and potassium to keep muscles from cramping. Fatty acids from fish and certain nuts fights off lactic acid and helps with muscle recovery.

kenr · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 11,120
Graham Haynie wrote:how does one actually get into training?
For you, I recommend this course:

1. Purchase the book: Rock Climbers Training Manual, by Anderson.

2. Do what it says, for seventeen weeks.

. . (Then ask your next question).

Ken
Ryan Kelley · · Broomfield, CO · Joined Jan 2014 · Points: 655

Have a kid. It really helped me focus on maximizing my training time.

Graham Haynie · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2017 · Points: 0

Sick, thanks for the response guys.
Ryan, unfortunately, I don't think it would be responsible to have a kid at my age, though I will take it into consideration.

slim · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2004 · Points: 1,045
Fajita Dave wrote: ....Fatty acids from fish and certain nuts fights off lactic acid.....
????
Tony Monbetsu · · Minneapolis, MN · Joined Jan 2014 · Points: 560

Remember that training in a sub-optimal way is better than not training at all (unless you end up injured). Someone doing a simple workout consistently for twelve weeks is going to see better results than somebody who does a perfect, optimized workout twice.

Take it slow, read, and try stuff.

Lukasz Czopyk · · Krakow, Poland · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 10
Tony Monbetsu wrote:Remember that training in a sub-optimal way is better than not training at all (unless you end up injured). Someone doing a simple workout consistently for twelve weeks is going to see better results than somebody who does a perfect, optimized workout twice. Take it slow, read, and try stuff.
(Unsure if it helps and don't want to be offensive but) in some situations I would slightly disagree with this.
Possibility coming to my mind is misuse of specific training tool that has a potential for creation of narrow-applicable, defined moving patterns. An example could be falling into fallacy of campus-boarding: while You may see gains in terms of power, contact strength etc. quantities that are in general considered to be climbing specific benefits, when Your goal was to climb long and sloppy hold enduro-fest, after too much of campusing You end up with completely inadequate moving habits and moves. In such situation I hazard a guess that it would be better not to perform any training at all.

In my opinion:
1. Consider Your general demeanor, abilities and potential for transferring training gains into increase of climbing level. Do You respond well to drills? Are You able to ORGANIZE training routines anticipated to be definitely beneficial for climbing?
2. If Yes, than train as specifically for Your goals as possible.
3. If No, perform low level, more general activities (WL?, weight shedding?) supposed to increase Your climbing potential but not messing with pros You already have.

Luk
will ar · · San Antonio, TX · Joined Jan 2010 · Points: 250

As someone else mentioned the Rock Climber's Training Manual is a pretty good resource and Horst also has some good books. Self Coached Climber is also noteworthy although probably the most difficult read of any climbing book and is focused more on "practice" than "training."

I think the most important thing is to ask yourself how serious do you want to be about training. For some training can be very monotonous and boring compared to just climbing, but on the other hand if you're the type of person who gets excited about seeing progress it can be very rewarding. Are you ok not climbing outside for a few weeks and doing hangboarding inside instead? Do you need to have the satisfaction of sending new routes or problems every climbing session. Decide what the right balance between hardcore training and climbing for fun is and then build your training philosophy around that.

Step one is to do an assessment of you current abilities and find out what your weaknesses are. One of Horst's books used to have a questionnaire that helped with this, but ask your friends for their input, and even better see if one of the coaches from the local climbing team can watch you climb. I did a full cycle of the RCTM (and saw a lot of improvement), but realized I had the most unrealized potential in terms of technique instead of improving my crimp strength.

Whatever training program you end up choosing, be consistent and stick with it for a while. Multiple times a week I get something in my inbox from climbing, trainingbeta, rock and ice, etc about the newest, greatest training plan. Don't drop your plan to go with the newest greatest thing after a week.

Periodized training plans can produce great results, but many of us can't plan our schedules around a performance phase to go on a trip or consistently get on our project during that phase. I think most people who have no experience with training would benefit a lot from having a plan every time they head to the gym instead of "just climbing." While RCTM has great long term plans I really liked the framework they had for individual workouts which I've tweaked for my needs/ability.

Old lady H · · Boise, Idaho · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 275
Graham Haynie wrote:Sick, thanks for the response guys. Ryan, unfortunately, I don't think it would be responsible to have a kid at my age, though I will take it into consideration.
You really need to honestly assess where you are, and what you want to accomplish, either on your own, with help from friends, or paying someone to help you set it up.

But, you will always need to tweak, so it behooves you to learn how to self assessment.

Just how young are you? That makes a difference, especially for males. Think of the physical difference in young teen, older teen, young twenties, and mid twenties. All still changing and growing. The body you have now, whatever your age, is not what you will have in the future.

It never hurts to go for well rounded general fitness, and that also gives you multiple ways to keep that body going over the long haul.

Best, Helen
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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