Best way to remove calluses?


Original Post
Optimistic · · New Paltz · Joined Aug 2007 · Points: 282

I've been using some 60 grit sandpaper but it's simultaneously kind of uncomfortable and seems not to work all that well. Suggestions? (apologies if this has already been covered, I did a quick search and didn't find it)

D.Sweet · · Damascus, MD · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 5

I do, and have used sandpaper. I have also snipped them off with nail clippers. I prefer to use a double bladed razor blade though to slice them off. Is faster than sanding, and depending on how much you slice off, it won't leave you with slightly tender spots.

Downtownt Kay · · Everett, WA · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 55

I use 220 grit. I get it from work, and i find it doesnt leave tender spots and still keeps it stiff/calloused enough

Dan Africk · · Brooklyn, New York · Joined May 2014 · Points: 170

A scalpel and #15 blade (the small one). Sounds extreme but it works better and you have more control than a clipper. Much better than having thick calluses come off in a flapper. Abrasives take way too long and it's hard not to scrape up other areas.

Scalpels are cheap on Amazon, buy a bunch so you can make sure to use a sharp one. You can get multiple uses out of a blade (just use alcohol on subsequent uses when it's no longer sterile). Might seem scary to use at first, but if you have thick calluses and are careful you really don't need to worry, you'll quickly gain confidence in using it safely. Just start with shallow slices. You can use just the blade but a handle makes it safer and easier.

Optimistic · · New Paltz · Joined Aug 2007 · Points: 282
D.Sweet wrote:I do, and have used sandpaper. I have also snipped them off with nail clippers. I prefer to use a double bladed razor blade though to slice them off. Is faster than sanding, and depending on how much you slice off, it won't leave you with slightly tender spots.
Razor blades! You find you're able to control that OK? (ie, not go too far and draw blood?)
Dan Africk · · Brooklyn, New York · Joined May 2014 · Points: 170
Optimistic wrote: Razor blades! You find you're able to control that OK? (ie, not go too far and draw blood?)
I had the scalpel from dealing with a plantar wart on my foot, so I had some experience. But it's really pretty straightforward.

You'll start out gingerly and careful I'm sure, afraid that you'll slip and go too far, but pretty soon you'll be more comfortable. Really you'll do less damage than you're probably doing with sandpaper.

I highly recommend the scalpel instead of a razor blade, you will have much more control. A sharp blade is the best way to maximize control and safety. Also do it when your skin is dry, not when you come out of a shower for example.
Dan Africk · · Brooklyn, New York · Joined May 2014 · Points: 170

Here you go. This is so cheap it's scary, and more blades than you'll ever need, but if you don't need fast shipping, it's probably your best bet:

http://a.co/iwb2L4Y

frank minunni · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined May 2011 · Points: 36

Pumice stone is the best.

Ross Ayer · · Southington, CT · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 40

Depending on how bad, about 150-220 grit sandpaper... You can use an electric sander if you aren't too chicken :)

NorCalNomad · · San Francisco · Joined Oct 2011 · Points: 55

Go surf a bunch, always gets mine to come off. :/

kenr · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 9,632

could try cuticle scissors.
Not the drugstore house brands.
Higher quality like Solingen or Tweezerman.

Ken

D.Sweet · · Damascus, MD · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 5
Optimistic wrote: Razor blades! You find you're able to control that OK? (ie, not go too far and draw blood?)
The DE blades for old school razors are thin and flexible. It would be hard to cut deep, unless you go perpendicular. :-/ I also have a bunch of these as I own a old 50's Gillette DE.
john strand · · southern colo · Joined May 2008 · Points: 1,575

Dare i ask why ?

Optimistic · · New Paltz · Joined Aug 2007 · Points: 282
Dan Africk wrote: I had the scalpel from dealing with a plantar wart on my foot, so I had some experience. But it's really pretty straightforward. You'll start out gingerly and careful I'm sure, afraid that you'll slip and go too far, but pretty soon you'll be more comfortable. Really you'll do less damage than you're probably doing with sandpaper. I highly recommend the scalpel instead of a razor blade, you will have much more control. A sharp blade is the best way to maximize control and safety. Also do it when your skin is dry, not when you come out of a shower for example.
True, in residency we'd work on calluses and plantar warts that way and I was amazed at how much deeper you could go than I expected. Just hadn't pictured that for fingers.
Optimistic · · New Paltz · Joined Aug 2007 · Points: 282
john strand wrote:Dare i ask why ?
Meaning why get rid of calluses? I find that the calluses I develop in the gym and on a hangboard have a really distinct ridge to them that is prone to tearing. I don't think I ever get that from climbing outside.
James Sweeney · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 0

corn plane

walmart.com/ip/28826832?wml...;adid=22222222227019153120&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=40843116032&wl4=pla-78656519792&wl5=9003494&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=online&wl12=28826832&wl13=&veh=sem

finish around the edges with stone/pumice

john strand · · southern colo · Joined May 2008 · Points: 1,575
Optimistic wrote: Meaning why get rid of calluses? I find that the calluses I develop in the gym and on a hangboard have a really distinct ridge to them that is prone to tearing. I don't think I ever get that from climbing outside.
Interesting, personally I have used sandpaper to get rid of ridges from flappers...maybe some times after nail clippers.

I'd be pretty hesitant to start cutting as you could create a ridge like you speak of
Optimistic · · New Paltz · Joined Aug 2007 · Points: 282

Thanks for all the beta guys! Always cool to see the different solutions people have worked out.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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