Climbing Gear Market Research


Original Post
Alex Zucca · · University Heights · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 285

Hey everyone,

I am taking a business in engineering course and chose to make my project about climbing equipment. I would really appreciate if you could take 2 minutes to fill out the survey below.

Also, please let me know if any of the questions were poor or if you have any suggestions. Thanks for helping me out!

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeMRBhWodz4ES3A83GVzbKvrSbT2736TDwm9_4eOfPoklM42g/viewform#responses

Ken Noyce · · Layton, UT · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 2,067
Alex Zucca wrote:Hey everyone, I am taking a business in engineering course and chose to make my project about climbing equipment. I would really appreciate if you could take 2 minutes to fill out the survey below. Also, please let me know if any of the questions were poor or if you have any suggestions. Thanks for helping me out! docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1...
Took the survey, a few issues I noted:

1. the question about preference of wire gate or solid gate on non-locking biners. I am required to pick one, but they are completely application dependent, my rack consists of a near equal split of wire and solid gate biners because I prefer the different gate types for different applications.

2. Questions about steel biners: I absolutely love steel biners and buy and use them regularly for replacing permadraws. There is absolutely no way I'd ever rack them on my quickdraws or gear though because the weight penalty is huge. Based on this, the questions about steel really don't make sense.

3. Questions about carbon fiber biners: I had to put that I wouldn't use or trust carbon fiber biners that were tested to the same standards as aluminum biners because carbon fiber biners would require additional types of testing due to the different physical properties of carbon fiber. That doesn't mean that I wouldn't ever trust them, but that's how I had to answer the question based on how it was written.
FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 275
Alex Zucca wrote:Hey everyone, I am taking a business in engineering course and chose to make my project about climbing equipment. I would really appreciate if you could take 2 minutes to fill out the survey below. Also, please let me know if any of the questions were poor or if you have any suggestions. Thanks for helping me out! docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1...
Once the survey has been submitted, there is a link that says "Submit another response." Why would you want someone to be able to submit more than one response? It would skew the data. Thanks.
Justin Barrett · · Russellville, AR · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 85

I'm curious about the carbon fiber carabiners. While I'm not an engineer, and someone who knows material science correct me if I'm wrong, doesn't carbon fiber have a low fracture coefficient? Basically they're stronger than steel when force is applied in one direction, but apply force in another direction it breaks easily.

Steel and aluminum are homogeneous/isotropic, so they would be better suited for a force perpendicular to the gate action, I.e. bent over an edge, than carbon fiber.

This is from personal experience of shattering a carbon fiber walking stick by falling in a creek crossing and bending the pole over a rock.

Billcoe · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2006 · Points: 655

On the carbon fiber biner question, you asked us to imagine the specs were the same, to answer that, I also made believe that the longevity was the same and went YES.

But I don't believe it. Furthermore, I wouldn't purchase them unless I was convinced that they were. Hope that helps.

Alex Zucca · · University Heights · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 285

For the carbon fiber questions I was trying to state that they theoretically have the same strength and wear and are just as reliable as aluminum ones.

I guess where I was going was I am trying to determine if there is a market stigma, with people not being open to new materials because of the status quo. I wondered if people wouldn't buy something just because it looks and feels like "plastic".

Alex Zucca · · University Heights · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 285
FrankPS wrote: Once the survey has been submitted, there is a link that says "Submit another response." Why would you want someone to be able to submit more than one response? It would skew the data. Thanks.
I see your point there. I wanted to make it as easy as possible for people to take the survey. To limit it to one response, I would have to require people to sign in to a google account before taking the survey. But you are right that this isn't the most scientific poll.
Ken Noyce · · Layton, UT · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 2,067
Alex Zucca wrote:For the carbon fiber questions I was trying to state that they theoretically have the same strength and wear and are just as reliable as aluminum ones. I guess where I was going was I am trying to determine if there is a market stigma, with people not being open to new materials because of the status quo. I wondered if people wouldn't buy something just because it looks and feels like "plastic".
In that case, you really need to change the question to something other than carbon fiber. Enough of us who are taking the survey have enough experience with carbon fiber to understand that it just won't have the same strength and wear and be just as reliable as aluminum because the physical properties just don't allow that. It would be better to rephrase the question to ask about a theoretical plastic material that is equivalent to aluminum in every way with the exception of being 50% lighter (or whatever your claim was).
Jake wander · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2014 · Points: 165

i took the survey. sorry i dont have any complaints.

Alex Zucca · · University Heights · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 285
Ken Noyce wrote: In that case, you really need to change the question to something other than carbon fiber. Enough of us who are taking the survey have enough experience with carbon fiber to understand that it just won't have the same strength and wear and be just as reliable as aluminum because the physical properties just don't allow that. It would be better to rephrase the question to ask about a theoretical plastic material that is equivalent to aluminum in every way with the exception of being 50% lighter (or whatever your claim was).
That makes sense, I updated the question to that.
David Tennant · · Denver, CO · Joined Feb 2013 · Points: 2,043

Took it. Super plastic for the win.

eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 456

Took it. Only thing I would add is more clarification on question 3

"Roughly how many non-locking and locking carabiners do you own? (NOT including quickdraws or alpine draws)"

Does that include racking biners or just stand-alone spare biners? What about belay biners or other dedicated lockers? Do cordalettes count as draws? Also, it think it might be helpful to separate lockers from non-lockers.

Steve_Sil. · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined May 2012 · Points: 85
David Tennant wrote:Super plastic for the win.
After I took the survey and decided super plastic was the way to go so bought these to replace all of my carabiners! They Glow in the Dark and they cost less than aluminum or steel! Thanks for the advise!

https://www.jaxmercantile.com/products/ultimate-survival-tactical-biner-carabiner.html
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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