6mm accessory cord for alpine draws


Original Post
Nickc Diaz · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 0

I have some extra 6mm, 6 ft. accessory cord. Can this be used for an alpine draw? If not I know this can be used as a waist prussik, any other ideas to make this thing useful?

I've read that 7mm accessory cord is okay to be utilized in an anchor but not necessarily 6mm. Is this correct?

Lots of questions that I can't find answers to in my books and they haven't come up in courses nor have I found anything via the search function.

Pete Spri · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2009 · Points: 170

It depends on what the cord is rated at. Take that rating, multiply by the breaking ratio (max is .8 from double fishermans, I believe) and see what it will be.

Accessory cord strength varies by manufacturer, so you will just have to figure it out. I would compare it to your hand sized cam strength ratings so you can make a valid decision.

Personally, I think the bulk of 6 is still more than 12mm dyneema. If you are trying to leave yourself tie-able runners for more alpine type rappelling after finishing routes, just have 12 of your draws normal dyneema, and then do 2 double length runners out of 6 or 7mm and call it good. I use them for creating anchors and bailing when I need to. They are also handy for prussiks as needed.

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 190

That sounds perfect for a chalk bag belt. You can use it as an emergency Prussik if shit hits the fan. As far as Anchors, obviously 6' is going to be too short for most anchor setups, but there's no hard/fast rule about diameter. It really depends on what you're using it for. Toprope anchor that you're going to set and forget and belay your kids all over? Probably better going for 8mm+ or tubular webbing, especially if it's running over any edges. Lead anchor for belaying your second? 6mm is plenty strong. The biggest concern is abrasion; even the thinner cords are way overbuilt for any peak forces that can be applied to an anchor. Even in FF2 situations, it's the gear that's going to fail/pull, not the anchor material.

Nickc Diaz · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 0

Awesome responses as always, I love this site. Thank you.

JCM · · Seattle, WA · Joined Jun 2008 · Points: 95
Ted Pinson wrote:That sounds perfect for a chalk bag belt. You can use it as an emergency Prussik if shit hits the fan.
This.
r m · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 0

Rap tat.

Random correlation regarding accessory cord:
http://theuiaa.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/UIAA102-Accessory-Cord-1.jpg
In that table, square the diameter and divide by 5 and you get the strength.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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