Methods of extending Pro


Original Post
Daniel T · · Riverside, Ca · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 35

I know this is probably a dumb question but I'm interested to know if a basket hitch is an acceptable method of extending a piece of pro. I see several ways people clip into pro.

Clip into the piece
Clip an alpine draw into the piece
Clip an extended alpine draw into the piece

My question would allow you to have a "middle ground" between alpine draw and fully extended sling. I could see this as useful for maybe the first 15-20 feet of climbing where ground fall could occur.

This is not a troll post by any means, just a thought I had while over worked and over caffeinated. sorry if its a "dumb" question.

Nick Sweeney · · Spokane, WA · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 650

You are making this harder than it needs to be. If there is ledge/ground fall potential, it may make sense to not extend a piece. Attempting to adjust how much it is extended by a few inches while on lead is just too much calculating/guesswork to be making on the sharp end.

Andrew Yasso · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Sep 2012 · Points: 215

I see no reason why a basket hitch wouldn't work. Less pinching than a girth hitch, but attempting to have the material a similar diameter seems wise. I think protecting yourself from the ground would be the bigger concern though, so basket it up!

Seems dense to say this, but just make sure you clip both loops, otherwise you've done nothing.

In situations where you can't move your cam, and carabiners are being cross loaded over an edge no matter how you clip it, I select to basket hitch with a sling just as you are suggesting.

  • edit* To Nick's point above, I generally agree. We spend a lot of time discussing hypotheticals on here, when the best choice is often to simply clip, and not fall. Consider the effort and time spent to get the sling on there 'correctly,' and the increased likelihood you'll now fall due to fatigue. On an awesome ledge before a crux move? Go for it I guess. Halfway through the crux? Just keep climbing.
FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 275

Sure, you can do that, but either a regular length draw or a shoulder-length runner are adequate options without the need for a "middle ground." And sometimes, you can just clip directly to the biner on the cam, with no extension.

Benk919 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 20

If you really felt the need there's always 30 cm slings, which should be 10cm longer than an alpine draw.

Andrewww · · Concord, NH · Joined Mar 2014 · Points: 620

I've done this in situations where a carabiner would be loaded over an edge.

Ross Ayer · · Southington, CT · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 60

You could double it up instead of tripling. The double may be challenging to do on a hard route, but you could carry a few like this. AKA Basket Hitch

Green: Alpine, Orange is Doubled

Healyje · · PDX · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 285

Keep it simple - either clip it or extend it. Don't get fancy, don't get clever, don't be inconsistent, you'll be safer in the long run. Also, the reason for slinging is to build pitch-long, minimal-friction rope paths while disturbing placements as little as possible in the process.

Daniel T · · Riverside, Ca · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 35

Thanks for the response guys. I don't think i'll be using it but I was just wondering it there would be any issues doing so. After seeing the picture that Ross shared there really isn't any advantage unless the carabiners are resting on a ledge.

Thanks for taking the time to respond.

Jack Servedio · · Raleigh,NC · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 30

Just use a double length runner still tripled up. It fits nicely between a tripled and extended shoulder length runner.

Noah Yetter · · Lakewood, CO · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 105

http://dmmclimbing.com/knowledge/improvisation-larks-foot-or-basket-hitch-vid/

rgold · · Poughkeepsie, NY · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 525
Healyje wrote:Keep it simple - either clip it or extend it. Don't get fancy, don't get clever, don't be inconsistent, you'll be safer in the long run.


End of story right there. Titrating the length of slings by inches has almost real effect in most situations.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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