Campus - big rungs or small ones?


Original Post
Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 70

Would I get more bang per session doing a smaller number of moves on smallest rungs or doing more on larger ones? Assume a very short and mild session.

Mark E Dixon · · Sprezzatura, Someday · Joined Nov 2007 · Points: 234

One opinion-

More a matter of what you wish to train.

Big rungs, longer moves, more shoulders.
Small rungs, more fingery.

If you can do big moves on small rungs, even better.

Once you've chosen your emphasis, then find a volume that allows you to recover as quickly as you desire.

reboot · · . · Joined Jul 2006 · Points: 50

One often overlooked difference between doing bigger moves and smaller moves on a campus board is your lower hand (at the completion of the move) goes through a larger range of motion with bigger moves and there's a press-down motion not found when doing smaller moves. So while it's true smaller rung+smaller move is more fingery in general, it also exercises a much smaller finger/wrist ROM.

Steve Pulver · · Williston, ND · Joined Dec 2003 · Points: 195

I had to spend a couple of workouts on just the large rungs before I could do anything on small.

Maybe the Metolious Medium size is a happy middle ground.

If youre trying to train power, most people recommend fewer moves the better. Whatever smallest size that you can do at least 4 moves on is prob what I would recommend. If your trying to do a lot of moves on the large rungs I think you're starting to train power endurance.

Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 70

I do 1-3 bumps/touches usually I actually don't know if I can do those bigger (e.g 1-4) on bigger rungs. What I do know is that I can not do as many small rung moves as bigger rung moves in a single session.

Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 70
reboot wrote:One often overlooked difference between doing bigger moves and smaller moves on a campus board is your lower hand (at the completion of the move) goes through a larger range of motion with bigger moves and there's a press-down motion not found when doing smaller moves. So while it's true smaller rung+smaller move is more fingery in general, it also exercises a much smaller finger/wrist ROM.
How big should I try to do? Should I aim to do say 1-3-5-7 ladders on medium rungs instead? Also, how much emphasis is on the pull with top hand? I.e. strive for longer touches or shorter ladders?
Steve Pulver · · Williston, ND · Joined Dec 2003 · Points: 195

Also, I think size choice is.dictated by size of holds on your goal routes.

aikibujin · · Castle Rock, CO · Joined Oct 2014 · Points: 200

I think this question is very similar to: would I get more bang by climb a small number of harder bouldering problems, or climb more problems that are easier?

Mark E Dixon · · Sprezzatura, Someday · Joined Nov 2007 · Points: 234
aikibujin wrote:I think this question is very similar to: would I get more bang by climb a small number of harder bouldering problems, or climb more problems that are easier?
I disagree.

A more apt comparison for your example seems like it would be
campusing 3 moves that are hard (135, 147, whatever is hard for you)
vs
campusng many easier moves (1234567, 13579infinty respectively.)

I believe Nivel is asking whather he should do hard campus moves on small rungs or large. But maybe I misinterpreted.
aikibujin · · Castle Rock, CO · Joined Oct 2014 · Points: 200
Mark E Dixon wrote:A more apt comparison for your example seems like it would be campusing 3 moves that are hard (135, 147, whatever is hard for you) vs campusng many easier moves (1234567, 13579infinty respectively.)
Isn't that exactly what the OP was asking?
Mark E Dixon · · Sprezzatura, Someday · Joined Nov 2007 · Points: 234
aikibujin wrote: Isn't that exactly what the OP was asking?
Maybe. We should ask him. Nivel?
Stanley McKnight · · Paradise Valley, Arizona · Joined Jan 2013 · Points: 13

Have you trained on a campus board before? I just ask because for the one I built at my house I initially put up smaller rungs thinking it would just be harder and thus a better workout . Initially I couldn't barely move between two rungs. I just used it for dead hangs and pull ups. I built some bigger rungs to help get used to the motion then initially worked my way to doing stuff on the smaller ones.

reboot · · . · Joined Jul 2006 · Points: 50
Nivel Egres wrote: How big should I try to do? Should I aim to do say 1-3-5-7 ladders on medium rungs instead? Also, how much emphasis is on the pull with top hand? I.e. strive for longer touches or shorter ladders?
Anything beyond (below) should height is sufficient. This can happen with 1-3-5 (with the hand on rung 1) or with progressive bump (1-3 to 1-4 to 1-5, etc), but it's a learned technique. You can prime your motion with some offset pullups on the campus rungs (pull as high as you can, there will probably be a shoulder turn as well). I think people will naturally pull to their limit (of pull strength or finger strength) when doing big moves anyway, so think of the push as a supplement to your pulling hand.
Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 70
Mark E Dixon wrote: Maybe. We should ask him. Nivel?
assume I can do the same moves (e.g. 1-3-5-7) on rungs of two sizes. Would I benefit more from 3 sets of that on smaller rungs or 5 sets on medium rungs?
Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 70
reboot wrote: Anything beyond (below) should height is sufficient. This can happen with 1-3-5 (with the hand on rung 1) or with progressive bump (1-3 to 1-4 to 1-5, etc), but it's a learned technique. You can prime your motion with some offset pullups on the campus rungs (pull as high as you can, there will probably be a shoulder turn as well). I think people will naturally pull to their limit (of pull strength or finger strength) when doing big moves anyway, so think of the push as a supplement to your pulling hand.
Got it. I really like bumps the way you describe (1-3 to 1-4 etc), feels like a type of burst movement that I really suck at.
Mark E Dixon · · Sprezzatura, Someday · Joined Nov 2007 · Points: 234
Nivel Egres wrote: assume I can do the same moves (e.g. 1-3-5-7) on rungs of two sizes. Would I benefit more from 3 sets of that on smaller rungs or 5 sets on medium rungs?
I vote smaller is better. Although I guess it depends on the weakness you intend to address. Still, since campus is usually about power, fewer/harder usually trumps more/easier.
Mike McKinnon · · Golden, CO · Joined Aug 2003 · Points: 25
Nivel Egres wrote: assume I can do the same moves (e.g. 1-3-5-7) on rungs of two sizes. Would I benefit more from 3 sets of that on smaller rungs or 5 sets on medium rungs?
Depending on your TUT and rest times you would be training different physiology.

If one set of smaller lasted you 30 seconds and you rested 90s (3x) it wold be anaerobic capacity.

If you set of larger also lasted you 30 seconds but you rested 30 sec (1x) it would be aerobic power.

If all TUT and rest is equal then do the smaller rungs.
aikibujin · · Castle Rock, CO · Joined Oct 2014 · Points: 200
Nivel Egres wrote: assume I can do the same moves (e.g. 1-3-5-7) on rungs of two sizes. Would I benefit more from 3 sets of that on smaller rungs or 5 sets on medium rungs?
In that case, I also vote for the smaller rungs.
JNE · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 1,830

I always thought of the campus board as having a nice and reasonably progressive step up of difficulty for any given movement in that I always used the big rungs to get a new distance or number of moves, then started working on that same pattern on the next rung size down.

An example would be learning to go 1-X for any number rung X. First find out what 1-X is on each rung size for yourself, then starting with the biggest rungs learn to go 1-(X+1). When you can do this go to the next rung size down and learn to do it at your personal (for that rung size) 1-(X+1), on down until you get to the smallest rungs. I do this for each exercise, which then has me randomly using different rung sizes depending the workout for that given day, and I structure it this way because my goal is doing the largest moves I can on the smallest holds I can and I see this as the most efficient way to do that.

Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 70
JNE wrote: I always used the big rungs to get a new distance or number of moves
Well, so lets say I am doing L1:R1 to L1:R3 then L1:R1 to L3:R1. I can do that set 3-4 times with 2-3 min rest on small rungs or I can do the same set with the same rest 5-7 times on medium rungs (never tried it on big ones). Which one is more beneficial from the training perspective? The consensus here is to do fewer on small rungs but I want to hear arguments in both directions.

PS. Should I also aim to do really big moves on the big rungs (those things are real jugs), is there any value to it?
Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 70
Mike McKinnon wrote: Depending on your TUT and rest times you would be training different physiology. If one set of smaller lasted you 30 seconds and you rested 90s (3x) it wold be anaerobic capacity. If you set of larger also lasted you 30 seconds but you rested 30 sec (1x) it would be aerobic power. If all TUT and rest is equal then do the smaller rungs.
Since I am planning to wrestle pebbles, anaerobic capacity. But then I am not even sure about that - I think main value of campusing for me is coordination/timing training.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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