Alex Barrows Training PDF


Original Post
Mike McKinnon · · Golden, CO · Joined Aug 2003 · Points: 25

I enjoyed this article as another perspective in training energy systems than the Anderson Bros. trainingbeta.com/wp-content...

He lists 5 systems:
Aerobic Capacity
Anaerobic Capacity
Anaerobic Power
Aerobic Power
Strength

He explains all of them except for Strength. Can anyone shed light on what he means by Strength. then he goes on to say in his example plan he says to train strength 4x.

any ideas?

Scott Campbell · · Suwanee Ga · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 0

I read it as 4 sets of bouldering (4x4's) hangboard / campusing (4 x 10 minutes rounds)and 2 sets of aerobic capacity workouts (wall or ground suicides , wall or ground sprints). Did that answer the question or am I way off base?

strength

reboot · · . · Joined Jul 2006 · Points: 50

I think he's using "power" and "strength"(force) in the way most climbers (non-physicists or cyclists) use (muscle) "strength" (usually relatively static) and "power" (aka ballistic strength). Reverse the 2 terms and for the most part everything makes sense.

His usage of power is the physics definition of power: work/time. That works great for something like cycling, but not weightlifting (which would be something like "# of reps * weight/time", e.g. for a fixed individual, number of pullups in 10 seconds), as nobody cares how fast you can rep. In climbing, speed climbing would then define "power", which few people give a shit about.

He doesn't differentiate between static strength and ballistic strength (so max hang, campus, hard bouldering of any style will all be just strength), though hard bouldering could have requirement on either end of spectrum. To be fair, there may not be any difference between static strength and ballistic strength from an energy system perspective (but definitely different from a CNS perspective).

Mike McKinnon · · Golden, CO · Joined Aug 2003 · Points: 25

Thanks. So what are strength exercise. the way you describe it sounds like he is using an power and strength interchangeably.

Max Hangs
Campus
Limit Bouldering

All the above he describes as an power.

reboot · · . · Joined Jul 2006 · Points: 50
Mike McKinnon wrote:Thanks. So what are strength exercise. the way you describe it sounds like he is using an power and strength interchangeably. Max Hangs Campus Limit Bouldering All the above he describes as an power.
Well, Alex would describe max hang, (foot-off) campus, limit bouldering as "strength".

For the rest of us, max hang would be strength, campus would be power (but not Alex's use of "power"), and limit bouldering may be a combination of both.

As far as I can tell, Alex's 4 uses of "power" and "capacity" are all forms of endurance for the rest of us.
Mike McKinnon · · Golden, CO · Joined Aug 2003 · Points: 25
reboot wrote: Well, Alex would describe max hang, (foot-off) campus, limit bouldering as "strength". For the rest of us, max hang would be strength, campus would be power (but not Alex's use of "power"), and limit bouldering may be a combination of both. As far as I can tell, Alex's 4 uses of "power" and "capacity" are all forms of endurance for the rest of us.
Thanks reboot. I figured as much. He is just not very specific. While he has some good nuggets in there they are hard to parse out because his language is too loose. He talks strength but never defines the exercises that are strength. From what you said, his strength is basically anaerobic power ( max hangs, campus, limit bouldering)
Mark E Dixon · · Sprezzatura, Someday · Joined Nov 2007 · Points: 234

You could just email him, or maybe Tom Randall, who is the mastermind behind the program. Or ask on the Lattice Training Facebook page.

aikibujin · · Castle Rock, CO · Joined Oct 2014 · Points: 200

If you replace "power" with "utilization" in that article it will probably make a lot more sense.

Here's another good read:
http://www.uphillathlete.com/capacity-training-vs-utilization-training/

Aerobic: Utilization Training increases the fraction, as well as the duration, of the maximum aerobic power that the athlete can sustain. Often called aerobic power training.

Mike McKinnon · · Golden, CO · Joined Aug 2003 · Points: 25
Mark E Dixon wrote:You could just email him, or maybe Tom Randall, who is the mastermind behind the program. Or ask on the Lattice Training Facebook page.
Good idea Mark!
RobMcV · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2012 · Points: 0
Mike McKinnon wrote:I enjoyed this article as another perspective in training energy systems than the Anderson Bros. trainingbeta.com/wp-content... He lists 5 systems: Aerobic Capacity Anaerobic Capacity Anaerobic Power Aerobic Power Strength He explains all of them except for Strength. Can anyone shed light on what he means by Strength. then he goes on to say in his example plan he says to train strength 4x. any ideas?
That whole PDF is baffling to me.... He doesn't really give any indication of what type of work you do for anything but strength. His base phase tells you to Boulder x4 the 0.5 of something else.... I mean I am sure this training regimen is legit but if it were in mandarin I'd only be slightly less confused.

Other than ARC I honestly have no idea what he is suggesting a person do at any point in this program.
Nick Drake · · Newcastle, WA · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 438
RobMcV wrote: That whole PDF is baffling to me.... He doesn't really give any indication of what type of work you do for anything but strength. His base phase tells you to Boulder x4 the 0.5 of something else.... I mean I am sure this training regimen is legit but if it were in mandarin I'd only be slightly less confused. Other than ARC I honestly have no idea what he is suggesting a person do at any point in this program.
It's not laid out well IMO, but the information is there. Pages 9-12 give examples of move/rest schemes for each energy system.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Post a Reply

Log In to Reply