Beer knot on dyneema


Original Post
that guy named seb · · Britland · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 205

From what I have heard the beer knot has no slip what so ever, anybody tried this on dyneema?

brian n · · Manchester, WA · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 91

Is Dyneema available in a tubular configuration? You need tubular for a beer knot and I've only seen flat Dyneema. Not much experience with it here so I'm not sure.

After seeing this video, though, I don't think I would knot Dyneema at all.

http://dmmclimbing.com/knowledge/knotting-dyneema-vid/

rgold · · Poughkeepsie, NY · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 525
that guy named seb wrote:From what I have heard the beer knot has no slip what so ever, anybody tried this on dyneema?
Reference please?

I used the beer knot on 1" tubular webbing BITD and it crept just like the water knot does (which means not much but not nothing). Since one end is inside the tubing, you can't verify visually that your ends are sufficiently long. I think that fact by itself makes it a terrible candidate for a climbing knot.
John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530

Yes, dyneema can be woven into tubular webbing (Mammut 8mm dyneema slings are tubular).

No, you cant get Dyneema in anything but pre-sewn slings.

No, i wouldn't use a beer knot (dyneema wont hold it anyway).

that guy named seb · · Britland · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 205
John Wilder wrote: (dyneema wont hold it anyway).
But how do you know it wont?
rgold · · Poughkeepsie, NY · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 525

There's lot of testing and anecdotal evidence that the water knot can slowly eat up its tails under cyclic loading. See for example the thread mountainproject.com/v/water.... As a general rule, it is reasonable to assume that everything about knot stability and strength is worse with dyneema, as this seems to be the case with the commonly used knots. So although it is fair to say we don't "know" whether or not the beer knot will behave badly under cyclic loading in dyneema, the record suggests dyneema should be deemed "guilty until proved innocent" when it comes to knotting.

In any case, the only tubular dyneema I've seen is the really thin slings. It is going to be a huge pain to stuff enough of a tail to make a beer knot with good ends---this won't be something a person would want to do in the field, and other than emergency field tactics, there doesn't seem to be any reason to knot dyneema of any kind, so this discussion is pointless from any practical standpoint.

20 kN · · Hawaii · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 1,352
John Wilder wrote: No, you cant get Dyneema in anything but pre-sewn slings.
You can find Dyneema cord quite easily. Slackliners use it all the time.

https://www.amazon.com/Samson-Amsteel-Rope-Spool-Black/dp/B00JW06XFA
that guy named seb · · Britland · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 205
rgold wrote:There's lot of testing and anecdotal evidence that the water knot can slowly eat up its tails under cyclic loading. See for example the thread mountainproject.com/v/water.... As a general rule, it is reasonable to assume that everything about knot stability and strength is worse with dyneema, as this seems to be the case with the commonly used knots. So although it is fair to say we don't "know" whether or not the beer knot will behave badly under cyclic loading in dyneema, the record suggests dyneema should be deemed "guilty until proved innocent" when it comes to knotting. In any case, the only tubular dyneema I've seen is the really thin slings. It is going to be a huge pain to stuff enough of a tail to make a beer knot with good ends---this won't be something a person would want to do in the field, and other than emergency field tactics, there doesn't seem to be any reason to knot dyneema of any kind, so this discussion is pointless from any practical standpoint.
Water knots are well documented under cyclic loads yeah but bear knots seem to have little to no data on how the perform under that kind of load and everything i have read says it doesn't slip like the water knot does. The thickness of the dyneema doesn't really matter to me nor does the ability to make the knot in the field i'm doing this because i want to re-sling my new wild country cams (i think i can do better) my choices are either making a sling out of 4mm dyneema cord or buying some slings cutting them up and using a water knot.
John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530
20 kN wrote: You can find Dyneema cord quite easily. Slackliners use it all the time. amazon.com/Samson-Amsteel-R...
The topic is webbing, not cord.
John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530
that guy named seb wrote: But how do you know it wont?
I've seen a pull test video somewhere or another. Can't remember where, but dyneema did not hold a beer knot.

More to the point, getting a piece of dyneema tubular webbing big enough to even try it would likely be impossible for anyone except a company like mammut who would have to make it.
that guy named seb · · Britland · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 205

I found a post forums.caves.org/viewtopic....;t=6653 talking about a test performed with a HMPE sling tied with a beer knot, apparently it locked up tight and didn't slip after being loaded to 400 pounds but would slip prior to the loading.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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