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Prana sold at Wal-Mart


Marc801 C · · Sandy, Utah · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 65
rob.calm wrote:Brick and Mortar businesses such as Walmart have obvious and well-known difficulties with the increasing share of business being done online. One way large businesses can profit from the online market is to allow advertising on their webpages. This is a curious reversal of the way things used to work. For example, Walmart advertised in newspapers (of course, it still does), but now so many people go to their website that these eyeballs became a valuable commodity for Walmart. So they sell advertising space on their website just as newspapers sell advertising. This has become a growing part of their revenue stream. Thus if you’ve been identified as the sort of person who uses mountainproject.com (ok, maybe not that but you’ve looked at sites for outdoor or climbing gear or athletic clothing) a presumably appropriate advertisement may appear when you log on to walmart.com. Here’s a little bit more technical stuff on how it’s done (probably not of interest to most people). Sites can generate advertising in one of two ways. First, they can have a very focused and valuable audience. For example, travel sites can identify who's researching travel to specific destinations, which creates media and audiences that can be sold to hotels, airlines and so on. Automotive research sites provide some of the highest value audiences. Or, sites can just generate scale, and sell access to audiences on the auction exchanges, where advertisers often seek specific audience members based on actions from other sites, such as the travel site example above. Most of the media is sold on an auction basis. The auctions work as a "second price" auction, rounding to the nearest 100th of a cent. If the top bidder, bid a price of $0.0031 to deliver an individual ad, and the second bidder had bid $0.0026 - the top bidder would get charged $.0027 to place the ad, one 100th of a cent more than the second bidder's offer. The bidding software constantly monitors bid-to-clearing ratios and is always trying to optimize at the site or page level to obtain the best clearing prices. Because advertisers want to manage the number of times an individual is targeted, they don't need to win every opportunity against that user. Often campaigns can reach users effectively, even if they are only winning 15% to 20% of their bids, as they'll "see" that user again on the next click, even on other sites. If their bids are "clearing" at too high of a rate, say 50% plus, the software notices that the bidder is maxing out on individual users too fast and will lower bidding on these individuals. Rob.calm
Thank you! That was a really good synopsis of a lot of stuff that would be tl;dr if Googled for those of us interested but not in the direct business (speaking of myself, for now at least).
Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,785
Marc801 wrote: Thank you! That was a really good synopsis of a lot of stuff that would be tl;dr if Googled for those of us interested but not in the direct business (speaking of myself, for now at least).
And the entire auction process occurs in less than 1/10th of a second. The volume is, of course, huge: hundreds of millions of events per second. Yea, ad serving is big, high tech business.
doug rouse · · Denver, CO. · Joined Apr 2008 · Points: 660

The end is near

Mark lewin · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2015 · Points: 5

I just got BD #2 and #3 cams from a dollar tree store

Marc801 C · · Sandy, Utah · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 65
Mark lewin wrote:I just got BD #2 and #3 cams from a dollar tree store
Um, the ones made from plywood really don't work too well......
Marc801 C · · Sandy, Utah · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 65
Ain't That Rich wrote:For a couple of weeks during the holidays, Costco was selling Patagonia Nano Puff Hoodies for $99.
Dammit! Missed seeing that.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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