Boulder, CO climber moving to East Coast


john strand · Jan 11, 2017 · southern colo · Joined May 2008 · Points: 1,575
There's always the Providence RI area....pretty good bouldering, a decent airport and really good food !

Jimmy Sledd · Jan 11, 2017 · Bozeman, Montana · Joined Mar 2013 · Points: 5
I grew up in Seattle, have family in Montana and used to live in Bozeman, and live in Boston now--for 2 more years, until I finish medical school. I am literally counting down the days until I leave.

DO NOT move out here. You will regret it. The resort skiing is garbage, basically tilted hockey rinks. Backcountry skiing consists mostly of attempting to navigate impassable birch groves. The climbing is excellent, but compared to Boulder, it's a LOOOOOOONG drive from any of these places and the weather is total crap. That's coming from someone who lived in Seattle and Bozeman, which are not known for being sunny and warm. It's hot, humid, and rainy in the spring and summer. The winter is basically unclimbable--I have a harder time climbing rock out here in winter than either Seattle or Bozeman.

The traffic in Boston is barely better than in Seattle. It's impossible to bike anywhere here without fearing for your life. People maladaptively cope with pent-up rage by driving homicidally. They salt the roads so much that anything you own made of metal will basically disintegrate in 5 years. People are RUDE compared to the PNW/MT/Colorado, even at the crags. Places are crowded--there are something like 50 million people in the DC-Boston corridor, and there's not nearly as much public land to handle the crowds. To cap it off, it's EXPENSIVE af to live out here.

If you consider yourself an outdoorsman first, DO NOT MOVE TO A BIG CITY IN THE NORTHEAST. I can't emphasize that enough. You will be unhappy and regret it. Places like North Conway, New Paltz, Burlington, Portland, etc would probably be a mild disappointment rather than soul-crushing but those sound like they are impractical for you with your travel requirements.

Tyler Osborne · Jan 11, 2017 · Charlotte, NC · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 0
Meanwhile everyone in The South is silent because they're outside climbing.

Jimmy Sledd · Jan 11, 2017 · Bozeman, Montana · Joined Mar 2013 · Points: 5
WTylerOsborne wrote:Meanwhile everyone in The South is silent because they're outside climbing.
I'd choose the South in a heartbeat over the Northeast but he said he needs to be between Boston and Baltimore

Kevin Heckeler · Jan 11, 2017 · Upstate New York · Joined Jul 2010 · Points: 1,371
City Dweller wrote: Dude's got an axe to grind. Concrete jungle got him shook worse than a Gunks climber on a sandstone splitter. Looking to justify his fear and paranoia by slandering the urban folk. Dog whistlin'. Disgraceful.
We all missed you and your high brow name calling.

Kevin Heckeler · Jan 11, 2017 · Upstate New York · Joined Jul 2010 · Points: 1,371
Jimmy Sledd wrote:I grew up in Seattle, have family in Montana and used to live in Bozeman, and live in Boston now--for 2 more years, until I finish medical school. I am literally counting down the days until I leave. DO NOT move out here. You will regret it. The resort skiing is garbage, basically tilted hockey rinks. Backcountry skiing consists mostly of attempting to navigate impassable birch groves. The climbing is excellent, but compared to Boulder, it's a LOOOOOOONG drive from any of these places and the weather is total crap. That's coming from someone who lived in Seattle and Bozeman, which are not known for being sunny and warm. It's hot, humid, and rainy in the spring and summer. The winter is basically unclimbable--I have a harder time climbing rock out here in winter than either Seattle or Bozeman. The traffic in Boston is barely better than in Seattle. It's impossible to bike anywhere here without fearing for your life. People maladaptively cope with pent-up rage by driving homicidally. They salt the roads so much that anything you own made of metal will basically disintegrate in 5 years. People are RUDE compared to the PNW/MT/Colorado, even at the crags. Places are crowded--there are something like 50 million people in the DC-Boston corridor, and there's not nearly as much public land to handle the crowds. To cap it off, it's EXPENSIVE af to live out here. If you consider yourself an outdoorsman first, DO NOT MOVE TO A BIG CITY IN THE NORTHEAST. I can't emphasize that enough. You will be unhappy and regret it. Places like North Conway, New Paltz, Burlington, Portland, etc would probably be a mild disappointment rather than soul-crushing but those sound like they are impractical for you with your travel requirements.
You must have an "ax to grind". lol

Scott McMahon · Jan 11, 2017 · Boulder, CO · Joined Feb 2006 · Points: 105
Ralph Swansen wrote:Hartford is a fair place and will feel more "like" Boulder than NYC.
haha i spent 22 years in the immediate Hartford area and have lived in Boulder for 10 and have never heard nor made this comparison.

Hartford is a shit hole. Sure it's got it's good and bad including one of the best art museums you can find, but it's still a hole. Don't get me wrong you can find things about it that you'll love, but there is no comparison other than it's not a huge city. It compare it more to Denver if Denver decided to be especially shitty. Don't ever leave your gear in your car for sure.

Oh if you want to get stoked on NE climbing though read this. Favorite book and will give you tons of history

https://www.amazon.com/Yankee-Rock-Ice-Climbing-Northeastern/dp/0811731030

Go Huskies

Kevin Heckeler · Jan 11, 2017 · Upstate New York · Joined Jul 2010 · Points: 1,371
Jimmy Sledd wrote: I'd choose the South in a heartbeat over the Northeast but he said he needs to be between Boston and Baltimore
Depends on a lot of things. There's even less rock in the deep south than in the Northeast, but less climbers as a percentage of the whole. The warmth and humidity though, it gets really bad. I lived a year in Florida, about half the year was the NE summer every day. I know the Carolinas and Tennessee get some relief, but they're still very warm during the May-Sept time frame.

The only benefit with the South would be the temps Dec thru early March.

Jimmy Sledd · Jan 11, 2017 · Bozeman, Montana · Joined Mar 2013 · Points: 5
Kevin Heckeler wrote: You must have an "ax to grind". lol
Certainly do. Miss the west terribly and don't want another lifelong Westerner to make the same mistake.

Nick Votto · Jan 11, 2017 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2008 · Points: 80
Scott McMahon is correct.

I'm trying to figure out how this became so NYC oriented. Sure, New York is arguably one of the greatest cities in the world, and if your priority is millions of beautiful women, amazing bars and one of the best restaurant scenes on the planet, the best live music scene hands down, it would be a great choice.
BUT, it's not all that close to climbing, is incredibly expensive, and is challenging to even have a car.

I don't love Boston nearly as much as NYC but I believe it's better in your case.
My vote would be somewhere like Northampton, MA or Nashua, NH

Scott McMahon wrote: haha i spent 22 years in the immediate Hartford area and have lived in Boulder for 10 and have never heard nor made this comparison. Hartford is a shit hole. Sure it's got it's good and bad including one of the best art museums you can find, but it's still a hole. Don't get me wrong you can find things about it that you'll love, but there is no comparison other than it's not a huge city. It compare it more to Denver if Denver decided to be especially shitty. Don't ever leave your gear in your car for sure. Oh if you want to get stoked on NE climbing though read this. Favorite book and will give you tons of history amazon.com/Yankee-Rock-Ice-... Go Huskies

Jimmy Sledd · Jan 11, 2017 · Bozeman, Montana · Joined Mar 2013 · Points: 5
Nick Votto wrote: I'm trying to figure out how this became so NYC oriented.

Alexander K · Jan 11, 2017 · The road · Joined Oct 2014 · Points: 15
Kevin Heckeler wrote: Depends on a lot of things. There's even less rock in the deep south than in the Northeast, but less climbers as a percentage of the whole. The warmth and humidity though, it gets really bad. I lived a year in Florida, about half the year was the NE summer every day. I know the Carolinas and Tennessee get some relief, but they're still very warm during the May-Sept time frame. The only benefit with the South would be the temps Dec thru early March.
Florida is not the center of southern rock climbing. In the South (VA, NC, TN, WV, AL, GA) there are just as many routes on Mt Project as the North East. The difference is that the Rock tends to be bigger and better on average in the South. There is also lots of awesome sandstone along with the quartzite, granite and gneiss that the North East has. I know that Charlotte might be a bit far south but the argument can be made that its a better place to travel from as weather delays are seldom an issue. Summer climbing may not be the best, but plenty of high country stuff that's doable in the shade.

Kevin Heckeler · Jan 11, 2017 · Upstate New York · Joined Jul 2010 · Points: 1,371
Alexander K wrote: Florida is not the center of southern rock climbing. In the South (VA, NC, TN, WV, AL, GA) there are just as many routes on Mt Project as the North East. The difference is that the Rock tends to be bigger and better on average in the South. There is also lots of awesome sandstone along with the quartzite, granite and gneiss that the North East has. I know that Charlotte might be a bit far south but the argument can be made that its a better place to travel from as weather delays are seldom an issue. Summer climbing may not be the best, but plenty of high country stuff that's doable in the shade.
Roger that, I wasn't implicating there was *any* climbing in Florida just used it a reference / point of credibility (aka - been there, done that). I also didn't climb when I was living in FL during my early twenties.

Not sure about those numbers though. Maybe by MP count, but there's a ton not on MP up here.

Kevin Heckeler · Jan 11, 2017 · Upstate New York · Joined Jul 2010 · Points: 1,371
Jimmy Sledd wrote:
You forgot CO = "mecca" ;-)

Jimmy Sledd · Jan 11, 2017 · Bozeman, Montana · Joined Mar 2013 · Points: 5
Kevin Heckeler wrote: You forgot CO = "mecca" ;-)
Haha I haven't actually spent much time in CO, and Boulder certainly isn't my cup o' tea. I just think that for a climber who's used to the benign weather, short drives, and climbing everywhere the Northeast will be a big disappointment. Which is not to say there aren't great climbers/skiers/boaters etc. out here. Hell, Jeremy Jones, arguably the best big-mountain skier/snowboarder in the world, grew up on Cape Cod--but there's a reason he lives in Tahoe now.

Bill Kirby · Jan 11, 2017 · Baltimore Maryland · Joined Jul 2012 · Points: 40
Jimmy Sledd wrote:
That map's funny. It reminds me that when I travel north to NY or MA everyone says I'm from the south. Redneck or hillbilly what have you.. if I travel to Durham or Atlanta then the locals say "damn Yankee". We're in no mans land over here :)

I will say I love living in Baltimore. I can travel as I please. But nowhere I mean nowhere can you make so much money changing light bulbs for the Feds. If there were a Washington DC in WA state or MT would be there in a minute.

Marc801 C · Jan 11, 2017 · Sandy, Utah · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 0
Something that people in this thread are forgetting.....
The OP said: "The only requirement is that I live near a major airport preferably between Baltimore and Boston. "

When a company sets that as a requirement, they mean it. They're looking for that person to live relatively near-by, not a 2hr commute. They also want their employee to travel quickly, meaning lots of flight options, ideally many of them non-stop. In short they want their employee to be able to minimize travel time.

Dinkey little airports like Providence, Manchester NH, Charlotte, Burlington, Hartford, et al just don't qualify. From the company's perspective, when they say between Baltimore and Boston and "major", there are really only about 5 or so.

I wouldn't be at all surprised if they said no to living in a number of places strongly suggested by some in this thread. New Paltz immediately comes to mind.

Nick Votto · Jan 11, 2017 · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2008 · Points: 80
Agree mostly on the airport point, although Hartford enables you to fly almost anywhere for great prices.
I've done 40-50 flights a year out of there for the last 4 years, all over the US, usually only do NYC for international travel.

Marc801 wrote:Something that people in this thread are forgetting..... The OP said: "The only requirement is that I live near a major airport preferably between Baltimore and Boston. " When a company sets that as a requirement, they mean it. They're looking for that person to live relatively near-by, not a 2hr commute. They also want their employee to travel quickly, meaning lots of flight options, ideally many of them non-stop. In short they want their employee to be able to minimize travel time. Dinkey little airports like Providence, Manchester NH, Charlotte, Burlington, Hartford, et al just don't qualify. From the company's perspective, when they say between Baltimore and Boston and "major", there are really only about 5 or so. I wouldn't be at all surprised if they said no to living in a number of places strongly suggested by some in this thread. New Paltz immediately comes to mind.

Robert Hall · Jan 11, 2017 · North Conway, NH · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 11,181
Marc801 has a good point...yet "everything is negotiable" (or should be)

In 50 years of living in the Northeast, I have NEVER not been able to drive to the airport and then found my flight NOT cancelled. Turning that around into a positive we get: EVERY time I have driven to the airport in snow, sleet, hail, or rain or wind I have been able to get there, but usually the flight is cancelled (or delayed). NEVER has a flight take off without me because of a road delay.

What should it matter to my company if I chose to live a normal 1 1/2 hrs from the airport?..if I can get on the flight(s). (AND, BTW, the last 10 miles to/from JFK or LaGuadia can easily take 1/2 - 3/4 of an hour.)

The "big" NE airports are JFK, Newark, LaGuardia (with about $30/day parking), then I think Phili or Boston. Baltimore, except for Southwest, is actually quite small...half the airport is "dead", just like Cincinnati since Delta bought Northwest and changed their hub from Cinci to Detroit.

Rich Brereton · Jan 11, 2017 · Durham, NH · Joined May 2009 · Points: 130
OP, if you're still tuning in, I didn't see you mention what type of climbing is your highest priority. You were curious about the Gunks, so I'll assume trad is your thing. The Gunks are phenomenal. So is NH trad (North Conway, Franconia Notch, etc.), which has the added benefit of 1000' classic routes on Cannon.

To be a committed climber and live anywhere in the Northeast, you have to embrace whatever climbing the weather offers. I grew up in Boston, lived on the Front Range for six years, and I now live in NH. Between the White Moutains, Willoughby, and satellite areas, New England has a lifetime of ice climbing. Yes, it hurts when my brother who lives in Denver tells me that he climbed at Eldo in a t-shirt in February. But I climb outside every month of the year too.

Boston has good day trip or weekend access to all of that ice. I recommend the northwestern suburbs: Somerville, Medford and Malden. 15 min to Logan Airport. Easy parking. Waaaay lower cost of living than NYC. Close to the Middlesex Fells, a park with very good trail running. Easy to hop on 93 or 95 and get up north. If you only have a half day, good bouldering 30 min away (Lynn Woods) or 1 hr away (Pawtuckaway). Easy access to all the urban amenities of Boston on public transportation. Close to two great gyms (Metrorock Everett and Brooklyn Boulders).

Good luck, let us know how it works out!

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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