New to training, looking for advice.


Original Post
Don Ferris · · Eldorado Springs · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 0

From inspiration from the 2017 climbing goals thread I came up with a potentially ambitious goal of red pointing my first 13. The thing is I've always just climbed for fun and up to this point I've managed to onsight 11ds and RP the occasional 12a outside and (never bouldered much outside before) send the occasional v8 or v9 in the gym.

Is there a tired and true regiment I can get on to reach my goal in a year or is that too ambitious? Is hangboarding the key? Do more cardio? Don't really know where to start. Thanks for any input.

Jon Rhoderick · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 590

What's your weakness?
What is your project like: long vs short, bouldery vs enduro, what angle?
How much time do you have to climb/train?
What sacrifices are you willing to make to make it happen?
Are you scared of falling?

Don Ferris · · Eldorado Springs · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 0
Jon Rhoderick wrote:What's your weakness?

Anything over vert. Non positive holds. Poor feet.

Jon Rhoderick wrote: What is your project like: long vs short, bouldery vs enduro, what angle?
I don't have my mind set on anything for sure yet but I'm leaning towards this:
https://www.mountainproject.com/v/hasta-la-hueco/108073893
Although I just realized consensus brought it down to 12d.
I'm looking for 100+ feet with a variety of climbing styles.

Jon Rhoderick wrote: How much time do you have to climb/train?

If I had to put a number per day I'd say at least 3 hours after work Monday through Friday. At least one full day on the weekends.

Jon Rhoderick wrote:What sacrifices are you willing to make to make it happen?

I would rather not die or get hurt. Don't care about diet or things like that.

Jon Rhoderick wrote: Are you scared of falling?
Kinda but it's more of scared of belayer dropping me. Some history there.
K. Le Douche · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2008 · Points: 65

I have the same goal for 2017...first 5.13.

I started doing the Training Beta program (trainingbeta.com)about a month ago. It's pretty easy to follow, pretty flexible, and only like $15/month. After a month I already feel like my endurance (my biggest weakness) is better so I'm pretty hopeful for the rest of the program.

Like you, I had never done any structured training before. I just climbed a bunch, then lifted a bunch. The basic structure of the program is based around six week blocks separated by a recovery week. Each six week block has a different focus (power endurance, finger strength, power, or endurance...if I remember correctly). The work outs are pretty hard, and easy to tailor to your fitness level.

The only thing I'm adding to the program on rest days is shoulder and elbow PT, and it seems to be enough.

Good Luck training and crushing

Don Ferris · · Eldorado Springs · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 0
K. Le Douche wrote:I have the same goal for 2017...first 5.13. I started doing the Training Beta program (trainingbeta.com)about a month ago. It's pretty easy to follow, pretty flexible, and only like $15/month. After a month I already feel like my endurance (my biggest weakness) is better so I'm pretty hopeful for the rest of the program. Like you, I had never done any structured training before. I just climbed a bunch, then lifted a bunch. The basic structure of the program is based around six week blocks separated by a recovery week. Each six week block has a different focus (power endurance, finger strength, power, or endurance...if I remember correctly). The work outs are pretty hard, and easy to tailor to your fitness level. The only thing I'm adding to the program on rest days is shoulder and elbow PT, and it seems to be enough. Good Luck training and crushing
Appreciate the input. I'll check that training beta out.
Mark E Dixon · · Sprezzatura, Someday · Joined Nov 2007 · Points: 234

If you are looking for online training, you should also look at Kris Hampton's site

http://www.powercompanyclimbing.com/learn-more/

His plans are a little more creative than those of Kris Peters. Although both are fine.

If money is no object, a Lattice training assessment,followed by online training with Tom Randall would be pretty cool.

http://latticetraining.com/train/

kenr · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 9,632

I'd guess that the most likely reason you won't reach your goal in 2017 is
injury
. . . one big one or several smaller ones.

Best book (in English anyway) now for managing and preventing climbing injuries is
Make or Break, by Dave MacLeod.

Ken

P.S. Of course training programs are a good way to help prevent injuries. After a few months on one (or two?) training programs, you might be ready for:
9 out of 10 Climbers Make the Same Mistakes, by Dave MacLeod.

Brandon.Phillips · · Alabama · Joined May 2011 · Points: 0

Rock Climbers Training Manual by the Anderson Brothers. I've read a bunch about training, and this book is by far the best.

Mark E Dixon · · Sprezzatura, Someday · Joined Nov 2007 · Points: 234
kenr wrote:I'd guess that the most likely reason you won't reach your goal in 2017 is injury . . . one big one or several smaller ones. Best book (in English anyway) now for managing and preventing climbing injuries is Make or Break, by Dave MacLeod. Ken P.S. Of course training programs are a good way to help prevent injuries. After a few months on one (or two?) training programs, you might be ready for: 9 out of 10 Climbers Make the Same Mistakes, by Dave MacLeod.
Are you getting kick backs from MacLeod? :-)
Jon Rhoderick · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 590

Don,
I would suggest finding a specific climb to work towards:
A: a climb is more inspiring than a number. Pick something you will find enjoyable for dozens of attempts and you will succeed, if the climb is tweaky or uninspiring you are unlikely to succeed.

B: you can figure out exactly what you need to do to send one climb easier than have a general idea of what 13- takes.

C: with your bouldering strength, you can probably already do all or 90% of the moves of a 5.13-, provided your v8/9 sends in the gym are somewhat transferable to outdoors and not some run and jump, double clutch, toe hook bullshit. You just need to learn the moves and climb them efficiently enough to clip the chains.

D: Learn good route tactics like working the route top down, breaking it down into manageable sections, and reworking beta until/unless your 100% positive you found the best way of doing a move.

A simple one season program with aerobic endurance, finger strength, limit bouldering, and power endurance, will be enough to get you into shape.
Failure to get your goal will come from not following the program or giving up on your route.

Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 50
Jon Rhoderick wrote: toe hook bullshit.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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