Ropec Questions and Accessories


Original Post
Michael C · · New Jersey · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 190

Looking to purchase the Petzl Rocpec. Couple of questions.

One – recommended type of SDS drill bit (specific brand) to use, and most commonly used size (10mm, or 12mm)

Two – types of bolts to use (most common, reliable) and sizes. Please include brand, and compatibility with drill bit size.

Links are helpful!

Highlander · · Ouray, CO · Joined Apr 2008 · Points: 175

I really like the Hilti TE-CX drill bits. Drill faster and last longer in my experience.

bolt choices depends on type of rock.

Ken Noyce · · Layton, UT · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 2,037
Michael C wrote:Looking to purchase the Petzl Rocpec. Couple of questions. One – recommended type of SDS drill bit (specific brand) to use, and most commonly used size (10mm, or 12mm) Two – types of bolts to use (most common, reliable) and sizes. Please include brand, and compatibility with drill bit size. Links are helpful!
You need to provide way more information for anyone to be able to answer your question. We need to know where you are located, what type of route you are putting up, what type or rock you are drilling, what kind of experience you have, etc. There are many types of bolts and bits that will work, but what would be best, or even what would work depend on many different factors.
Greg Barnes · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 1,498

Are you in Europe? 10mm and 12mm bits are hard to find and very expensive in the U.S.

Bolt choice is highly dependent on the rock. I've hand drilled lots of different sizes, from short 3/8" stainless in good granite to 1/2" in sandstone to 6" deep 12mm holes for glue-ins in really soft rock (and the 6" deep hole in soft rock took half the time of a smaller 2" hole in granite).

So where are you drilling, what type of rock, do you know what others use in that rock?

Michael C · · New Jersey · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 190
kennoyce Noyce wrote: You need to provide way more information for anyone to be able to answer your question. We need to know where you are located, what type of route you are putting up, what type or rock you are drilling, what kind of experience you have, etc. There are many types of bolts and bits that will work, but what would be best, or even what would work depend on many different factors.
North West New Jersey and North East PA - Silurian Shawangunk Conglomerate (gray quartzite), Tuscarora Quartzite

No bolting experience - will be practicing, of course, on talus boulders
Ken Noyce · · Layton, UT · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 2,037
Michael C wrote: North West New Jersey and North East PA - Silurian Shawangunk Conglomerate (gray quartzite), Tuscarora Quartzite No bolting experience - will be practicing, of course, on talus boulders
You're in the US, so bit size will be either 3/8" or 1/2", not 10mm or 12mm (unless you just really want to spend a whole bunch of money for no real reason). Quartzite is generally a very hard rock, so you will most likely be placing short 3/8" bolts. I have no experience with the areas you are bolting, but if the quartzite is anything like what I have drilled, it's going to take hours to drill a single hole with a rocpec. As far as bolts go, in the 3/8" size and for hard rock, my personal favorite is the stainless hilti kb3. As far as bits, I usually go with bosch due to price, but I always hear good things about the hilti bits, and hand drilling in hard rock you're going to want any advantage you can get.
C. Williams · · the Climber Cave · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 954

I'll second what Ken said for bolt choice. The stainless KB3 is by far my favorite, though Powers and ITW Red Head also make a quality stainless wedge anchor. If you plan to tap holes on rappel you might consider 3/8 X 2-1/4" power-bolts in stainless as well. Don't forget to practice with a torque wrench to get a feel for the proper torque on the bolts. As for drill bits I love the 4 bladed bits from Milwaukee.

20 kN · · Hawaii · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 1,128

Your best bet will always be to find a local expert and get training in person from him or her. Look at what the locals are using and what has been working for years. The Hilti KWIK 3 is one of the better options for hard rock, but again see what the locals are doing.

Michael C · · New Jersey · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 190

Thank you all for the information.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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