Gear for a striptease


Original Post
Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 130

Now that I got your attention, I want to talk about a related topic.

As a pebble-wrestler, I go crushing (ok, mostly failing) for like 30 seconds only to follow it with 30 minutes of complete inactivity, at best spotting another boulderer. In the winter it poses a problem - "how do I dress in such way that I'd be warm during my rest period, but that are easy to take off and put on for another burn?"

So far I have a heavy puffy jacket and a pair of puffy side-zip pants. I am considering buying a pair of Polartech booties and gluing on a rubber sole, but I am not convinced. Are there any ideas from the collective?

Chris C. · · Seattle, WA · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 246
Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 130

Hmm. This could double up as an extra pad too.

Old lady H · · Boise, Idaho · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 265

Basically, I do the same thing, falling a lot than inactivity, except I call it climbing and belaying.

Assuming it's in and out of climbing shoes, sounds like ya got the rest, I've got lined, zip snow boots that are comfy in bare naked feet (staying with the stripper tease). On and off pretty quickly, and good for standing around in the cold. Good for mud slogs in the thaw, too.

Matt Himmelstein · · Orange, California · Joined Jun 2014 · Points: 115

I would probably take my down parka, but you can also consider a swim/SCUBA parka. They are fleece lined coats with a wind/water proof exterior. Longer than a parka, they are nice and warm. Of course, since you don't have the potential of getting wet, the waterproof exterior may be o less value.

https://www.amazon.com/Adoretex-Unisex-Parka-Black-Lining/dp/B004VY1IFC?th=1

Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 130

Actually, a terrific idea, but how much insulation does this thing have compared to a belay jacket?

aikibujin · · Castle Rock, CO · Joined Oct 2014 · Points: 290

As a boulderer at heart, I'm disappointed that you didn't include a beanie in your cold weather outfit.

I like an insulated hood with my parka (even when I'm wearing a beanie). It traps all the warm air raising from the collar and keep me nice and toasty, vital when it's windy.

I use an old pair of insulated ski pants, no side zippers but I don't think they are necessary. I'm taking off my shoes as soon as I'm done with a route, so I can pull on my insulated pants while I change out my shoes.

I also found that as long as I keep my body and legs warm, and keep my climbing shoes inside my parka, I don't need a lot of insulating for my feet. I like to keep my feet a little colder anyway to keep them from sweating too much (but you may not have that problem). I bought a pair of Salewa insulated Capsico, which can be used as shoes or slippers. I found them to be sufficient for my needs.
http://www.salewa.us/en/men-capsico-insulated-shoes.html?color=69153

Depends on how far the approach is, you can also bring a portable space heater. I've seen some pretty sweet heater set up at a crag that's about 5 minutes from the car.

Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 130

By now my beanie hat has become an integral part of me. I don't take it off, I even shower in it!

Eric Carlos · · Chattanooga, TN · Joined Aug 2008 · Points: 40

Do you really need to rest 30 minutes to recover from a few seconds of activity?

Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 130
Eric Carlos wrote:Do you really need to rest 30 minutes to recover from a few seconds of activity?
Most times I try to rest a minute for each hard move on the problem, so 30 min is definitely a top end. I usually rest longer if I am trying to get the final linkup, especially if the problem is not my style. Don't forget, I am not a teenager unfortunately:(
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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