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Stiffening old tricams


Original Post
Nolan Huther · · Clarkson University · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 602

Unlike the new style of tricams which has a stiff webbing for easy one handed placements, the older style tricams have a loop in them that makes them floppy and cumbersome to place since you have to hold the tricam closer to the head, or old them by the head itself, which is awkward in the smaller sizes. I guess that CAMP made them like that so that rope tugs could be slightly mitigated on the placement of they are clipped directly. I really don't do that much clipping direct since I use tricams on easier routes or slabs which wander and whatna.

Anyway, does anyone know of a way to stiffen these up to be placed like the modern tricams? I use them somewhat often, usually on easier routes or in the backcountry to supplement cams for less weight, and the occasional visit to the Gunks in the future may be nice to have extras for anchors. I figured a few wraps of masking tape but I was wondering if anyone has any other ideas or had a novel fix for this already. Thanks!

Older style with the floppiness and newer style with stiff sewn webbing
n00b · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 40

{insert inappropriate Viagra joke here}

Nolan Huther · · Clarkson University · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 602

I'd say it's appropriate

nathanael · · Riverside, CA · Joined May 2011 · Points: 307

I seem to recall seeing a guy that cut a strip of plastic from a milk jug as a backbone and then wrapped the whole thing in athletic tape.

PTR · · NEPA · Joined Aug 2009 · Points: 10

Tape by itself -- or wraps of tape to hold thin plastic strips in place that have been inserted between the strands of webbing. But, IMO, the stiffer slings have led some people to sort of blindly place tri-cams deep into cracks -- insert deep, yank, and go (like SLCDs). This makes them much harder to eye-ball and extract -- which is usually a fingery task.

Edit: Nathanael beat me to it!

Jonny d · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2011 · Points: 40

Buddy of mine does what Nathanael indicates, except he uses strips cut from the lid of a rubbermaid tub and wraps with duct tape. Seems to work really well.

Caz Drach · · Sugarhouse, UT · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 310

^ Wraps of plasic marking tape works well. You could probably splint it with a pipe cleaner or a plastic coffee stirrer.

-Z

climbing coastie · · Wasilla, AK · Joined Feb 2011 · Points: 90

I use plastic electrical wire ties (zip ties) cut to length and taped at both ends. Works great!

wivanoff · · Northeast, USA · Joined Mar 2012 · Points: 472

Tape, zip ties, flattened plastic straw from McDonalds, plastic milk carton. They all work.

Fortuna Wolf · · Durham, NC · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 20

Sewing machine. run a couple lines of straight stitches up and down the floppy area until you like the stiffness level.

ViperScale · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2013 · Points: 235

Find a piece of cardboard to put in the middle and than wrap it in tape. It is simple and works good.

This is a picture of holding my new and old ones straight out in the air (picture top down) not laying on the ground.

Seth Jones · · New Lenox, IL · Joined Feb 2015 · Points: 25

hairspray. lots and lots of hairspray.

Nolan Huther · · Clarkson University · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 602
Seth Jones wrote:hairspray. lots and lots of hairspray.
All these other options sound like too much work. I'll go with this one
Seth Jones · · New Lenox, IL · Joined Feb 2015 · Points: 25
Nolan Huther wrote: All these other options sound like too much work. I'll go with this one
And if you have any left over, you can give yourself a flock of seagulls hairdo and fuel your spud gun! It's a win-win!
Hobo Greg · · My Van · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 120

I bought some tricams off a guy on MP and they came with heat shrink plastic, works great.

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 190

I'm going with apparently my default answer for all tricam repair threads:

Tricams are what? $20?

Nolan Huther · · Clarkson University · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 602

I'm not spending $20 on new tricams when I have ones for free that are just a bit floppy that took me 5 minutes to fix with a set of small zip ties and an old orange juice bottle.

Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,745
Nolan Huther wrote:I'm not spending $20 on new tricams when I have ones for free that are just a bit floppy that took me 5 minutes to fix with a set of small zip ties and an old orange juice bottle.
Yea, but have you priced ORANGE JUICE lately? It's almost cheaper to buy the new Tricams.
Nolan Huther · · Clarkson University · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 602

Meal plan, bruh. That's not *real* money. Swipe away and I have food off my beloved tuition.

JSchloem · · Homer, AK · Joined Nov 2015 · Points: 260

Use climbing tape to tape a ziptie backbone to the tricam

grant N · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2011 · Points: 3

I find it funny that noone has said get a few reslind with dynema. I was looking into getting some of mine redone this winter and i saw like 7 or 8 bucks per tricam to get them redone. If you have any onlder ones with ratty slings. Why not give this a try?

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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