Recovery tips and tricks?


Original Post
Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 50

I am finding that after a hard day of training or doing burns on a project I am very sore and tired. Besides taking multiple days off, do you have anything that works for you to improve recovery?

Pa. Does going for gentle runs help or is that a myth?

normajean · · Reading, PA · Joined Jun 2015 · Points: 50

Try post workout high glycemic load carb + protein shake which help glycogen and protein synthesis and spreed up recovery. I don't have my well-researched recipe on me but I am sure you can google it. Generally it is some combination of protein powder and matodextrin or sugar if you cant find where to get that.

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45

I've generally felt much better when I went for runs/bike rides on rest days. Warms up muscles without stressing or straining.

Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 50

So like a conversation paced run? For how long?

I already take some protein after a workout or on my way out from the crag, but I avoid sugar. There must be a keto-friendly version of this too, no?

Aleks Zebastian · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 0
Nivel Egres wrote:I am finding that after a hard day of training or doing burns on a project I am very sore and tired. Besides taking multiple days off, do you have anything that works for you to improve recovery? Pa. Does going for gentle runs help or is that a myth?
climbing friend,

slap your forearms with frozen fish of considerable size!

do the meditation and thinking on how your forearms they will grow big and strong!

eat yourself plenty of sugar, sweet sweet nector of the gods, plenty of fish oils and frozen fishheads for power.
Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45
Nivel Egres wrote:So like a conversation paced run? For how long? I already take some protein after a workout or on my way out from the crag, but I avoid sugar. There must be a keto-friendly version of this too, no?
Yeah. Nose breathing, still solidly in the aerobic zone...I try to aim for 45 min - 1 hr, but it depends on your personal fitness. Something where you feel like you get a good workout but aren't sore/exhausted the next day.
djh860 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 0

Protein post work out is essential as is water lots of water

Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 1,865
djh860 wrote:Protein post work out is essential as is water lots of water
And a single aspirin for me always worked wonders.
normajean · · Reading, PA · Joined Jun 2015 · Points: 50
Nivel Egres wrote:I avoid sugar. There must be a keto-friendly version of this too, no?
There has been some discussion in the scientific community due to recent resurgence and proliferation of keto diets that bodies of athletes on keto learn to be more efficient at fat metabolism. Not sure if there is consensus on that . Glycogen is the most efficient source of energy and being on keto you are glycogen depleted. That may be your main issue
reboot · · . · Joined Jul 2006 · Points: 50
Nivel Egres wrote:I am very sore and tired.
If I'm sore, I've found stretching and/or perform some complex movement patterns (shadow boxing, martial arts forms, yoga) to help. If I'm just tired, then sleeping always helps more than anything else.
Nivel Egres wrote:Does going for gentle runs help or is that a myth?
Ted Pinson wrote: I try to aim for 45 min - 1 hr, but it depends on your personal fitness.
I don't run very much (so I'd like to see some definitive proof), but I've never found it to help recovery from hard climbing. And 45min - 1hr? I'd rather take that extra rest. As general fitness (part of training)? Yes.
Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 50

what about easy ARC-style climbing, is that a good idea? I would like to keep the flow going but I definitely can't train, even after a full day of rest. Maybe if I go the the gym and do some 5.9-5.10 routes or, if the weather is good, solo some 5.2?

I am going to replenish my stash of fish heads and try the method recommended by Alex, too

Brendan Blanchard · · Boulder, CO · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 475
Nivel Egres wrote:I already take some protein after a workout or on my way out from the crag, but I avoid sugar. There must be a keto-friendly version of this too, no?
You're deliberately depriving your body of carbohydrates, and you wonder why you're having trouble recovering? Recovery depends on the muscles themselves repairing (protein, rest), as well as the restoration of in-cell energy reserves (glycogen, rest). If the body (and the brain...) are starved of their primary (natural) mechanism for replenishing these reserves, it's not really a mystery why you're having trouble. Ditch the fad diet and eat healthy carbohydrates in a normal ratio to your suggested fat and protein intake.

Cite all the gym-brah resources you want, but there isn't really positive evidence for a Keto diet for a true athlete, and many sports nutritionists (Dr. Elena Zinkov for one, writes for Climbing occasionally), recommend strongly against keto diets for athletes, sorry.
Muscrat · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2011 · Points: 3,040

I too suffer from the "I want more" syndrome. What i have found, duh, is the best way to recover is just the hardest one; rest. You will end up stronger in the end by letting your body recover, rebuild, and rejuvenate.
All that said, keep a detailed log of not only your climbing days, but your rest days, and see what your body likes. Over a period of months/years you can tune a program specifically for your body and lifestyle.
btw, rest is not just not climbing. Good nutrition, good sleep, etc make a difference.
To answer your need more directly, i ride an "Attack bike" (Airdyne), do some light antagonist work, maybe ARC, depending on what the plans for the upcoming week are.

Aleks Zebastian · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 0
Nivel Egres wrote: I avoid sugar. There must be a keto-friendly version of this too, no?
climbing friend,

I am apologies, but the ketogenic diet is most unacceptable for performance and recovery... Do you see elite world class athletes avoiding carbs? I am thinking not, no.

perhaps you are recovering if you consume carbohydrate, myah, yes.

for example elite kenyan runner eating 76.5% of daily energy from carbohydrate.

http://www.active.com/running/articles/eating-practices-of-the-best-endurance-athletes-in-the-world
reboot · · . · Joined Jul 2006 · Points: 50
Brendan Blanchard wrote: but there isn't really positive evidence for a Keto diet for a true athlete
It's high time for most Boulderites to realize they are no true athletes and it makes little sense to eat & train like one. There is little study on whether Keto diet is good or bad for desk-jock-weekend rock warriors.
Kevin Deininger · · Arvada, CO · Joined Dec 2016 · Points: 0

As far as your muscles go, the best thing is if you can get them good quality protein and carbs immediately following your day last climb. Easiest would be to bring a protein shake with you, and then as soon as you hit the ground after the final climb of the day, drink it. Then follow it within an hour or two with a good meal with quality protein and carbs.

Also, when you get off the climb, stretch! Stretching after exertion is well shown to reduce soreness and will help maintain range of motion. I would learn arm and hand stretches and perform them all after your last climb of the day while still warm.

The next day it's best to do some gentle exercise, focusing on a different part of the body than you were working on. Most days of rock climbing this means working on the legs as your arms would be sore (could be exceptions though for example if you spent all day stemming). I think the very best is yoga, especially something like a vin-yin class, with half an hour of warmup and vinyasa and then half an hour of stretching.

Jona Dul · · New Milford, CT · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 15
Aleks Zebastian wrote: climbing friend, I am apologies, but the ketogenic diet is most unacceptable for performance and recovery... Do you see elite world class athletes avoiding carbs? I am thinking not, no. perhaps you are recovering if you consume carbohydrate, myah, yes. for example elite kenyan runner eating 76.5% of daily energy from carbohydrate. active.com/running/articles...
i love how you present your words
informative and serious yet unique, helps people take note, at least it does with me
Aleks Zebastian · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 0
Kevin Deininger wrote:As far as your muscles go, the best thing is if you can get them good quality protein and carbs immediately following your day last climb. Easiest would be to bring a protein shake with you, and then as soon as you hit the ground after the final climb of the day, drink it. Then follow it within an hour or two with a good meal with quality protein and carbs. Also, when you get off the climb, stretch! Stretching after exertion is well shown to reduce soreness and will help maintain range of motion. I would learn arm and hand stretches and perform them all after your last climb of the day while still warm. The next day it's best to do some gentle exercise, focusing on a different part of the body than you were working on. Most days of rock climbing this means working on the legs as your arms would be sore (could be exceptions though for example if you spent all day stemming). I think the very best is yoga, especially something like a vin-yin class, with half an hour of warmup and vinyasa and then half an hour of stretching.
climbing friend,

yes, you are doing the yoga. You are recovering and will also be impressing the ladies and calming your inner child.
Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45
reboot wrote: If I'm sore, I've found stretching and/or perform some complex movement patterns (shadow boxing, martial arts forms, yoga) to help. If I'm just tired, then sleeping always helps more than anything else. I don't run very much (so I'd like to see some definitive proof), but I've never found it to help recovery from hard climbing. And 45min - 1hr? I'd rather take that extra rest. As general fitness (part of training)? Yes.
Again, it depends on the person, but the key for me is low intensity. I find that it helps loosen stiff/sore muscles and generally feel better the next day as long as it's not my running limit and I'm not heavily exerting myself. Of course, as always, YMMV and I don't pretend to make the claim that it will work for everyone, just that it works for me.

Also, yeah...the Atkins diet needs to choke on its clogged arteries and die of a heart attack like its founder. One of the least healthy diets I've ever seen, and definitely not something that is suitable for maintaining an active lifestyle. Also, not all carbs are created equal. Equating simple sugars with complex starches and whole grains is just bad science.
Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 50
Brendan Blanchard wrote: You're deliberately depriving your body of carbohydrates, and you wonder why you're having trouble recovering? Recovery depends on the muscles themselves repairing (protein, rest), as well as the restoration of in-cell energy reserves (glycogen, rest). If the body (and the brain...) are starved of their primary (natural) mechanism for replenishing these reserves, it's not really a mystery why you're having trouble. Ditch the fad diet and eat healthy carbohydrates in a normal ratio to your suggested fat and protein intake. Cite all the gym-brah resources you want, but there isn't really positive evidence for a Keto diet for a true athlete, and many sports nutritionists (Dr. Elena Zinkov for one, writes for Climbing occasionally), recommend strongly against keto diets for athletes, sorry.
I have been having trouble recovering before I started keto. If anything, i am recovering faster now but it could also be due to many other factors. Dave McLeod switched to keto and sent Practice of the Wild, so apparently some true athletes do well on keto. This said, I am not a true athlete. My climbing is beginner-intermediate at most.
Aleks Zebastian · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 0

climbing friend,

you are sticking with the science and time tested strategies, not the anecdote of one or a handful of hardmen.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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