The Homestead Poop Problem


Original Post
K-Tanz · · Phoenix, AZ · Joined Sep 2010 · Points: 205

A few weeks ago after a day at Rough Rider and North Buttress I pulled my rope off of Great Northern. The rope knocked a rock at the base of the bolt line exposing a giant pile of human shit and toilet paper which, of course, my rope landed in. Right underneath the bolt line.

This past week I informed some climbers from Colorado who were camped in The Corral area that they were campeed on private property. They replied saying that they had initially set up camp at the ridgeline group site after the third gate, but upon exiting the vehicle detected the strong smell of human feces. Doodie, caca, poop. They exited the car and reportedly found multiple dump sites complete with toilet paper and all. This is in spite of the fact that there is a latrine adjacent to that site.

After the Adopt a Crag this past weekend can anyone attest to the human waste problem at the popular camp spots? What can we do to mitigate this? I know some crags have wag bag dispensers at the trailheads but how much does this help? I would hate to see an Enchanted Tower situation happen here at everyone's favorite limestone paradise.

Luke Bertelsen · · Tucson, AZ · Joined Feb 2005 · Points: 2,801
Wagbag - you can even make these with paper bags + cat litter + gallon Ziplock

Rest Stop (Available in large group sizes if paired with a portable toilet -essentially a bucket with a lid.)

There are so many products specifically made for ways to deal with human feces in the woods beyond burying it, or in this case not burying it. Make the effort to try and you'll find it's rather easy. Unfortunately, its also unrealistic to think everyone will make the extra effort and not leave bombs near the crag, camping areas, and trail.

Everyone poops!
Johnny Kipp · · St Albert Alberta · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 100

And we wonder why so many new gyms are popping up. Get your shit together people!

K-Tanz · · Phoenix, AZ · Joined Sep 2010 · Points: 205

I think people who know what a wag bag is, or for that matter probably most people on a climbing forum, are not the problem here.

Does anyone have experience with the success or failure of putting a wag bag station at trailheads for crags? Ultimately outreach education at the gym level are likely the best solution, but a short term solution is likely needed here.

MacM · · Cave Creek/Preskitt, AZ · Joined Feb 2010 · Points: 670

This is a short-minded suggestion, but Friends of the Inyo was able to get a grant from the Access Fund and work with the Inyo National Forest Service to get a decomposition toilet at the Buttermilks in Bishop. It has been beyond successful over the last few years from what I have heard and seen. Of course a lot more people visit the Buttermilks compared to the Homestead..

-Mac

Politically Correct Ball · · From WA to AZ · Joined Dec 2016 · Points: 5

Last time I climbed there, there was an army-style trench latrine. Extending it wasn't difficult in that substrate.

Nyte Knight · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 10

It's not that hard to dig a cathole and cover your waste.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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