Potrero Chico logistics beta


Original Post
smurray47 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2014 · Points: 25

Hey folks, had a few questions about the logistics of the area.

Money-wise, do most place take card, should I bring cash $US, or should I bring an ATM card and take out pesos when I get there? Does a taxi to EPC from the airport use the meter, or is it something that should be discussed before embarking?

Groceries-wise, is walking to Hidalgo every couple days a viable plan?

Accomodations-wise, unfortunately we're going to be around there during peak season, Dec 20-Jan 5-ish. Anyone want to chime in on experience with camping accommodations that offer a balance of secure storage, relative quiet at night, and proximity to the crags? Not a big partier, more of a 1/2 beers and read kind of guy.

Climbing-wise, we're obviously going to try to hit some of the classics, but I'd love to hear some stories if anyone has had some fun adventures that wouldn't show up on the top 10 climbs on MP.

Thanks much!

David Gibbs · · Ottawa, ON · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 6

Money-wise -- cash. US or Mexico. Few to no places will take plastic.

Groceries -- walking in towards Hidalgo every 2-3 days is pretty common, how often depends on how much you bring, often it can be 3-5 days. Don't generally have to go all the way in, there is a store part-way out of town. Also, sometimes you can hitch a ride.

Camping - Posada tends to be loudest. Pagoda or Homero's a bit quieter. Can't really comment on security.

Climbing-wise -- really depends on the grade you're pulling. Lots and lots of good stuff there.

Chris Winter · · Portland, OR · Joined Apr 2008 · Points: 305

Take a wad of US US $20s.

Yes, walking to Hidalgo is the way to go. Plan to hit the open air market when it is open. I think Sundays and Thurdaya? I forget the exact days, but its awesome and cheap.

None of the campgrounds are secure as far as your stuff is concerned. Be careful and bring a lock. Posada has lockers you can use, and I recommend using them during the day for your valuables.

Climb Timewave.

Joie Prothero · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2011 · Points: 85

Check into your foreign transaction fees for ATMs beforehand. Usually the 1-2% charge is a better deal than what the currency exchange booths at the airport will offer you. There are multiple ATMs at the Monterey airport that will provide you local currency or dollars.

La Posada is the most popular campsite and easily the loudest. Check out Homeros.

A taxi can range between $40-50 USD. It's highly probable that you could split a taxi by approaching other obvious climbers. Otherwise, here is an email address of my taxi driver. potreroed@hotmail.com. his name is Hervey.

Markets are Friday and Tuesday. Check out El Buho Cafe for book exchanges, wifi, beta, BBQs, etc. Mike is an awesome asset to the community and the profits from his cafe go to the construction of a middle school.

Johnathan C · · Missouri · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 55

Rancho sendero has a new hostel that has lockers in it.

DrRockso · · Red River Gorge, KY · Joined Sep 2013 · Points: 326

Satori is a stellar climb that doesn't get as much traffic as other classic's due to a longer approach. All pitches are easily linked so it's very doable to do it in 4 long pitches. The Walk is well worth avoiding rock fall during the busy season.

DrRockso · · Red River Gorge, KY · Joined Sep 2013 · Points: 326

In my experience your US Bank is going to give you the best exchange rate so get some money exchanged before you go, pesos are preferred by most IMO. An ATM is available next to the town square, it is a bit of a walk to get to if you're on foot.

Loganator · · blue van, on the highway to no · Joined Jan 2012 · Points: 240

The most important information is that Leobardo's tacos at Don Rubens mini-super are the best tacos I've ever had! They are much better than the climbing, and you should completely forget about buying groceries in town, as your cooking is guaranteed to pale in comparison to Leo's tacos. Plus, you'll get free spanish lessons and shots of mezcal if he likes you.

Ndumont · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2014 · Points: 30

+1 for Leos. Cheaper cerveza and mucho better food than posadas or homeros or whatever you cook. He even invited us in to watch Soccer with the family. He only accepts Pesos

smurray47 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2014 · Points: 25

Thanks folks!

MikePond · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2011 · Points: 85

What's the best guidebook for Potrero these days?

Mike Stearns · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2007 · Points: 1,630

Seems like phone-based Rakkup currently has the best info and should have a print guide available soon.

Anyone arriving Dec 26 and want to share a ride from Monterey airport to EPC? I will already be in EPC, but my wife is arriving ~1:15PM and we are looking to split a cab for her. PM me if you are interested!

BrianWS · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2010 · Points: 790

Leo's tacos (and burritos) are really good. The pizza truck is super pricey, but a fun hangout with a very cool owner. Grocery runs are nice if you like breakfast and snacks for climbing (booze, too).

As far as unsung classics go, check out Pitch Black. Nice long pitches mostly in the 5.10- range. It's very strangely bolted and has some spray painted warnings on loose blocks, but the climbing is stellar and it receives comparatively little traffic given the route quality and grade.

David Gibbs · · Ottawa, ON · Joined Aug 2010 · Points: 6
Mike Stearns wrote:Seems like phone-based Rakkup currently has the best info and should have a print guide available soon.
Yep, heard the same.

Dane's guide (The Whole Enchilada) is out-dated, and I think, out-of-print.
Ed's guide is reasonably up-to-date (last year), but hard to use as your only guide, generally being just a listing of routes with minimal-to-know description.
Rakkup is phone-based (digital).
There's an all-Mexico guide from a few years back that contains a reasonable EPC section, but it is a huge two-volume guide with lots of information you don't need for a trip to EPC.

I'm looking forward to when Frank gets his print version done (sometime in 2017?).
Will Tabor · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 5

Just got back a couple days ago and absolutely reccomend what these fellas are saying. Not only is La Posada crowded and the most expensive, their grass is fairly uncomfortable. Sendero is super super friendly, the owners are locals, and the grass is plush. I mostly used the Whole Enchilada and it is obviously outdated. With the addition of so many routes since it was last printed, route finding through just the Whole Enchilada is pretty difficult. Not hard at all to find partners to climb with because everyone is so dang friendly. EL Buho is a sweet little coffee shop just to the right of the main grocery store, and the manager Mike is a crusher (and all around rad dude) who can give you some great beta. Don't miss out on the single pitch stuff!

Marcelo Gzz · · Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico · Joined Nov 2013 · Points: 35
smurray47 wrote:Hey folks, had a few questions about the logistics of the area. Money-wise, do most place take card, should I bring cash $US, or should I bring an ATM card and take out pesos when I get there? Does a taxi to EPC from the airport use the meter, or is it something that should be discussed before embarking? Groceries-wise, is walking to Hidalgo every couple days a viable plan? Accomodations-wise, unfortunately we're going to be around there during peak season, Dec 20-Jan 5-ish. Anyone want to chime in on experience with camping accommodations that offer a balance of secure storage, relative quiet at night, and proximity to the crags? Not a big partier, more of a 1/2 beers and read kind of guy. Climbing-wise, we're obviously going to try to hit some of the classics, but I'd love to hear some stories if anyone has had some fun adventures that wouldn't show up on the top 10 climbs on MP. Thanks much!
Hi being from Monterrey around 40 mins from EPC, there are a few ATM machines scaterd in town, and a bank. There is also a nice grocery store that accepts cards. La posada accepts cards but charge a rate. so bring money to pay stance, beers and tacos and pay with card all the food at the grocery store. Taxi from airport is a flat rate, so ask before hand, and the day you arrive should you buy the return taxi to the airport in advance.

If I were you, I try some of these estrellitas, supernova, yankee clipper, treasures of sierra madre, snot girs, satory, to name a few.

for more info you can contact MARK GRUNDON ELPOTREROCHICOGUIDES.COM
good luck

Marcelo Gonzalez
20 kN · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 1,352

If driving through the Del Rio crossing, does anyone know where to get Pesos from an ATM? Does the place where you stop to get your vehicle and tourist permit have an ATM?

If driving to EPC, is it safe to leave a van with stuff in it parked at one of the campgrounds for the duration of one's stay or are vehicle break-ins common?

Johnathan C · · Missouri · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 55

20kn,

I don't know if there's an ATM near the Transportation Center or not, but there are places you can stop at stateside to exchange money before crossing, and it's a little better of a deal than exchanging on the other side of the border.

As far as the van thing goes, I hesitate to blurt that it's safe to leave it parked in any campground because you never know what could happen, but, that being said, I haven't heard of any break-ins this year, and there's people who've been living out of their vehicles this season without any problems.

Hope that helps.

DrRockso · · Red River Gorge, KY · Joined Sep 2013 · Points: 326

Vehicle Breaks in are not common at the campgrounds. I would not recommend parking your car at La Posada, as the parking there is very limited. We crossed at Laredo you could get pesos exchanged at a counter located in the Banjercito, but as mentioned earlier you will get a slightly better rate at your local US bank.

20 kN · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 1,352
Johnathan C wrote:20kn, there are places you can stop at stateside to exchange money before crossing, and it's a little better of a deal than exchanging on the other side of the border.
Are you talking those commercial, currency exchange counters that exchange like 10 different types of money? I've always found an ATM is the best place to get cash as you should always get the daily international currency exchange rate less the standard ATM fee.
Johnathan C · · Missouri · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 55
20 kN wrote: Are you talking those commercial, currency exchange counters that exchange like 10 different types of money? I've always found an ATM is the best place to get cash as you should always get the daily international currency exchange rate less the standard ATM fee.
Oh for sure, but I don't remember seeing one at the transportation center. Maybe there's one near.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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