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DL Winter Access


Original Post
Jack Servedio · · Raleigh,NC · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 35

Is it worth getting a cheap pair of C1 type crampons for winter access in Devils Lake or should I just stop being a pussy and deal with the slip n' slide?

I've only been out there on warmer days the past couple winters a handful of times each year, but it was treacherous AF in approach shoes and regular snow boots with the trails covered in a sheet of ice. I never got very far up east or west, and always ended up on the north slope or over by the railroad tracks. I'd love to actually make it to the bigger east bluff stuff for some winter aid, but I kept falling getting up there and I'd rather not take a tumble down the talus on the CCC trail.

How do you guys get to the East Bluff when there is snow and ice on the ground? Or somewhere that's a pain in good weather, like Cleo's?

rging · · Salt Lake City, Ut · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 210

Plenty of traction aid devices besides crampons.

Jack Servedio · · Raleigh,NC · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 35
rging wrote:Plenty of traction aid devices besides crampons.
Very true - if C1 crampons would be way overkill here - what kind of cleats or whatever would you guys suggest (if any)?
rging · · Salt Lake City, Ut · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 210

Micro spikes are the cream of the crop but the most expensive. Super easy to put on or take off and they aren't sharp so won't shred your gear carrying them when not in use. A lower cost choice which works well in mixed conditions are instep crampons with four points.

Jack Servedio · · Raleigh,NC · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 35
rging wrote:Micro spikes are the cream of the crop but the most expensive. Super easy to put on or take off and they aren't sharp so won't shred your gear carrying them when not in use. A lower cost choice which works well in mixed conditions are instep crampons with four points.
Thanks - any particular microspikes you would recommend?
Clint White aka Faulted Geologist · · Lawrence, KS · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 158

If u already have trekking poles for backpacking and stream crossing, having four points of contact does wonders. If not, def get some.

rging · · Salt Lake City, Ut · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 210

Microspikes are made by Kahtoola and run about 50-60 bucks. I have not seen any knock off brands. Four point instep crampons like the Salewa run half the cost and are made by several manufactures. Yak Tracks are all but useless.

RandyLee · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined May 2016 · Points: 5

Came here to say don't get Yak Tracks. It has already been said. You have options. I don't know the area, but if it's a slippery slope, an ice axe for the slide down and a sense of adventure can go a long way.

Jack Servedio · · Raleigh,NC · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 35
RandyLee wrote:Came here to say don't get Yak Tracks. It has already been said. You have options. I don't know the area, but if it's a slippery slope, an ice axe for the slide down and a sense of adventure can go a long way.
There is zero need for an ice axe, that's for sure. I think trekking poles would be far more appropriate and possibly some sort of traction device. I definitely would want something with actual spikes though, and was never considering something like Yak Tracks. The microspikes look pretty awesome though, and the reviews I've read seem to agree.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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